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Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860–1935)

Autor(a) de The Yellow Wallpaper [short story]

134+ Works 12,319 Membros 349 Críticas 21 Favorited

About the Author

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Hartford, Conn. Her traumatic childhood led to depression and to her eventual suicide. Gilman's father abandoned the family when she was a child and her mother, who was not an affectionate woman, recruited relatives to help raise her children. Among mostrar mais these relatives was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Due to her family situation, Gilman learned independence, but also became alienated from her many female relatives. Gilman married in 1884 and was soon diagnosed with depression. She was prescribed bed rest, which only seemed to aggravate her condition and she eventually divorced her husband, fearing that marriage was partly responsible for her depressed state. After this, Gilman became involved in feminist activities and the writing that made her a major figure in the women's movement. Books such as Women and Economics, written in 1898, are proof of her importance as a feminist. Here she states that only when women learn to be economically independent can true equality be achieved. Her fiction works, particularly The Yellow Wallpaper, are also written with feminist ideals. A frequent lecturer, she also founded the feminist magazine Forerunner in 1909. Gilman, suffering from cancer, chose to end her own life and committed suicide on August 17, 1935. More information about this fascinating figure can be found in her book The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: An Autobiography, published in 1935. (Bowker Author Biography) Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Hartford, Conn. Her traumatic childhood led to depression and to her eventual suicide. Gilman's father abandoned the family when she was a child and her mother, who was not an affectionate woman, recruited relatives to help raise her children. Among these relatives was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Due to her family situation, Gilman learned independence, but also became alienated from her many female relatives. Gilman married in 1884 and was soon diagnosed with depression. She was prescribed bed rest, which only seemed to aggravate her condition and she eventually divorced her husband, fearing that marriage was partly responsible for her depressed state. After this, Gilman became involved in feminist activities and the writing that made her a major figure in the women's movement. Books such as Women and Economics, written in 1898, are proof of her importance as a feminist. Here she states that only when women learn to be economically independent can true equality be achieved. Her fiction works, particularly The Yellow Wallpaper, are also written with feminist ideals. A frequent lecturer, she also founded the feminist magazine Forerunner in 1909. Gilman, suffering from cancer, chose to end her own life and committed suicide on August 17, 1935. More information about this fascinating figure can be found in her book The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: An Autobiography, published in 1935. (Bowker Author Biography) mostrar menos
Image credit: From Wikipedia

Séries

Obras por Charlotte Perkins Gilman

The Yellow Wallpaper [short story] (1892) 3,161 exemplares
Herland (1915) 2,573 exemplares
Herland and Selected Stories (1892) 310 exemplares
Women and Economics (1898) 211 exemplares
Unpunished: A Mystery (1998) 119 exemplares
Yellow Wallpaper & Other Stories (2018) 93 exemplares
Herland/The Yellow Wallpaper (1600) 86 exemplares
With Her in Ourland (1916) 67 exemplares
100 Eternal Masterpieces of Literature - volume 1 (2017) — Contribuidor — 56 exemplares
What Diantha Did (1912) 47 exemplares
The Crux (1911) 44 exemplares
Moving the Mountain (2009) 38 exemplares
The home; its work and influence (1972) 30 exemplares
21 Essential American Short Stories (2011) — Contribuidor — 22 exemplares
Benigna Machiavelli (1993) 12 exemplares
If I Were A Man (1914) 9 exemplares
The Yellow Wallpaper (2021) 9 exemplares
When I Was a Witch (2017) 5 exemplares
Concerning Children (2002) 5 exemplares
The Classic Gothic Horror Collection (2021) — Contribuidor — 3 exemplares
Making a Living 2 exemplares
The Giant Wistaria 2 exemplares
Dr. Clair's Place 2 exemplares
Her Houskeeper 1 exemplar
My Poor Aunt 1 exemplar
The Unexpected 1 exemplar
Dagi Yerinden Oynatmak (2021) 1 exemplar
La ‰carta gialla 1 exemplar
Martha's Mother 1 exemplar
Cross-Examining Santa Claus (2013) 1 exemplar
Human work (2005) 1 exemplar
Joan's Defender 1 exemplar
Spoken To 1 exemplar
Her Beauty 1 exemplar
Mrs. Elder's Idea 1 exemplar
Collected Stories 1 exemplar
Žuti tapet i druge priče (2013) 1 exemplar
The Forerunner 1 exemplar
Herland Annotated (2021) 1 exemplar
Turned 1 exemplar
Old Mrs. Crosley 1 exemplar
[No title] 1 exemplar

Associated Works

The Oxford Book of American Short Stories (1992) — Contribuidor — 741 exemplares
The Dark Descent (1987) — Contribuidor — 716 exemplares
Great American Short Stories: From Hawthorne to Hemingway (2004) — Contribuidor — 585 exemplares
The Oxford Book of Gothic Tales (1992) — Contribuidor — 534 exemplares
American Gothic Tales (1996) — Contribuidor — 454 exemplares
Points of View: Revised Edition (1966) — Contribuidor — 410 exemplares
Great Short Stories by American Women (1996) — Contribuidor — 408 exemplares
The Essential Feminist Reader (2007) — Contribuidor — 314 exemplares
The World's Greatest Short Stories (2006) — Contribuidor — 263 exemplares
Gothic Short Stories (2002) — Contribuidor — 241 exemplares
Daughters of Decadence: Women Writers of the Fin-de-Siècle (1993) — Contribuidor — 184 exemplares
Black Water 2: More Tales of the Fantastic (1990) — Contribuidor — 152 exemplares
The Penguin Book of Women's Humour (1996) — Contribuidor — 117 exemplares
The Lifted Veil: Women's 19th Century Stories (2005) — Contribuidor — 113 exemplares
The Standard Book of British and American Verse (1932) — Contribuidor — 113 exemplares
The Utopia Reader (1999) — Contribuidor — 111 exemplares
American Fantastic Tales: Boxed Set (2009) — Contribuidor — 92 exemplares
The American Fantasy Tradition (2002) — Contribuidor — 89 exemplares
Evil Roots: Killer Tales of the Botanical Gothic (2019) — Contribuidor — 88 exemplares
65 Great Spine Chillers (1988) — Contribuidor — 78 exemplares
The 13 Best Horror Stories of All Time (2002) — Contribuidor — 77 exemplares
Wolf's Complete Book of Terror (1979) — Contribuidor — 75 exemplares
Selected Stories from the 19th Century (2000) — Contribuidor — 72 exemplares
The Heath Anthology of American Literature, Concise Edition (2003) — Contribuidor — 67 exemplares
Haunted House Short Stories (Gothic Fantasy) (2019) — Contribuidor — 65 exemplares
The Medusa in the Shield (1990) — Contribuidor — 63 exemplares
American Christmas Stories (2021) — Contribuidor — 59 exemplares
Dark: Stories of Madness, Murder and the Supernatural (2000) — Contribuidor — 57 exemplares
The Vintage Book of American Women Writers (2011) — Contribuidor — 56 exemplares
Lost Worlds Short Stories (Gothic Fantasy) (2017) — Contribuidor — 54 exemplares
Scribbling Women: Short Stories by 19th-Century American Women (1997) — Contribuidor — 49 exemplares
The Experience of the American Woman (1978) — Contribuidor — 46 exemplares
An Omnibus of 20th Century Ghost Stories (1989) — Contribuidor — 45 exemplares
Horror Stories: Classic Tales from Hoffmann to Hodgson (2014) — Contribuidor — 44 exemplares
The Signet Classic Book of Contemporary American Short Stories (1985) — Contribuidor — 42 exemplares
Best Loved Short Stories of Nineteenth Century America (2003) — Contribuidor — 39 exemplares
Haunting Women (1988) — Contribuidor — 36 exemplares
Medusa's Daughters (2020) — Contribuidor — 34 exemplares
Eight Strange Tales (1972) — Contribuidor — 33 exemplares
The Haves & Have Nots: 30 Stories About Money & Class In America (1999) — Contribuidor — 33 exemplares
Rediscoveries: American Short Stories by Women, 1832-1916 (1994) — Contribuidor — 32 exemplares
She Wields a Pen: American Women Poets of the Nineteenth Century (1997) — Contribuidor — 32 exemplares
More Macabre (1961) — Autor — 31 exemplares
American Gothic Short Stories (Gothic Fantasy) (2019) — Contribuidor — 29 exemplares
American gothic : An anthology 1787–1916 (1999) — Contribuidor — 25 exemplares
Deadlier: 100 of the Best Crime Stories Written by Women (2017) — Contribuidor — 19 exemplares
The Other Woman: Stories of Two Women and a Man (1993) — Contribuidor — 18 exemplares
The Cold Embrace: Weird Stories by Women (2016) — Contribuidor — 14 exemplares
Restless Spirits: Ghost Stories by American Women, 1872-1926 (1996) — Contribuidor — 14 exemplares
A Quaint and Curious Volume: Tales and Poems of the Gothic (2019) — Contribuidor — 14 exemplares
The Wrong Turning: Encounters with Ghosts (2021) — Contribuidor — 13 exemplares
Witches' Brew: Horror and Supernatural Stories by Women (1984) — Contribuidor — 10 exemplares
The Great Modern American Stories: An Anthology (1920) — Contribuidor — 10 exemplares
Great Tales Of The Supernatural (1978) — Contribuidor — 6 exemplares
Evergreen Stories (1998) — Contribuidor — 5 exemplares
Best of Women's Short Stories, Volume I (2005) — Contribuidor — 4 exemplares
Great Classic Womens Fiction (2011) 3 exemplares
Enjoying Stories (1987) — Contribuidor — 2 exemplares
Virginia's Sisters: An anthology of women's writing (2023) — Contribuidor — 1 exemplar

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Nome legal
Gilman, Charlotte Anna Perkins
Outros nomes
Stetson, Charlotte Perkins
Data de nascimento
1860-07-03
Data de falecimento
1935-08-17
Localização do túmulo
cremated
Sexo
female
Nacionalidade
USA
Local de nascimento
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
Local de falecimento
Pasedena, California, USA
Causa da morte
suicide
Locais de residência
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Pasadena, California, USA
New York, New York, USA
Norwich, Connecticut, USA
Educação
Rhode Island School of Design
Ocupações
novelist
short story writer
social reformer
magazine editor
public speaker
economist (mostrar todos 8)
women's rights activist
suffragist
Relações
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (great-aunt)
Beecher, Catharine (great-aunt)
Hooker, Isabella Beecher (great-aunt)

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in Hartford, Connecticut, to Frederick Beecher Perkins and his wife Mary Fitch Westcott.
Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Beecher, and Isabella Beecher Hooker, three of the most distinguished 19th-century American writers and women's advocates were her great-aunts of whom she was very proud. Charlotte herself became a noted writer, public speaker, economist, and women's rights and suffrage activist. In 1884, at the age of 24, she married Charles Walter Stetson, an aspiring artist, and the following year gave birth to their daughter. Shortly after the birth, Charlotte suffered a serious bout of what today would be diagnosed as post-partum depression. Her best remembered work today is her semi-autobiographical short story "The Yellow Wallpaper," published in 1892. She also wrote a famous treatise, Women and Economics (1898), in which she said women could never be truly independent until they first had economic freedom. This theme was explored through her lectures, her more than 1,000 nonfiction publications, and her fiction. In 1900, Gilman remarried to her first cousin, George Houghton Gilman. Over the next 25 years, Charlotte also ran her own magazine, The Forerunner, in which many of her stories appeared. An advocate of euthanasia, Gilman ended her life at the age of 75 with an overdose of chloroform. Her work fell into obscurity until it was revived by the women’s movement in the 1960s. In 1994, Charlotte Perkins Gilman was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York.

Membros

Discussions

Críticas

Despite the short length of "The Yellow Wallpaper", every time I read it there is another little detail to discover or a moment that sits with me differently than the time before.
 
Assinalado
deborahee | 143 outras críticas | Feb 23, 2024 |
A creepy short story written in 1892 about a woman with mental health issues, and her doctor husband thinks the cure is to keep her locked up in her bedroom. The she starts seeing things and then really goes mad. I saw this recommended around Halloween amongst the BookTok'ers on TikTok, as the creepiest story ever. Not sure if it goes at the top of the list, but its definitely up there.
 
Assinalado
mahsdad | 143 outras críticas | Feb 10, 2024 |
In a college cultural history course, I read turn-of-the-twentieth century feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s most famous writing, The Yellow Wallpaper, which is the fictional first-person narration of a mother suffering from post-partum depression whose physician husband rents a summer home so she could take the “rest cure” -- although it is said to have been based on Ms. Gilman's own battle with post-partum depression. The yellow patterned wallpaper in the room she is confined to becomes a symbolic prison as the narrator descends into madness in this popular novella published in 1892. That was my introduction to Ms. Gilman’s writing, and I re-read it three years ago when my book club chose it along with Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar. Herland, published in 1915, is a longer novel and one of Ms. Gilman’s several utopian novels focusing on a civilization run by women.

In this utopian novel, three men – Jeff Margrave, Terry Nicholson, and Van Jennings (the story’s narrator) – are part of an expedition to one of the few remaining uncharted regions on earth, an area rumored to be populated only by women, hidden high in the mountains. Typical of men at that time (who am I kidding -- still typical thinking of many men), they assume that any comparison of this women’s world to the allegedly civilized United States and Europe that they know, will be to the disadvantage of the former. These three, who have mixed motives for wanting to find this women-centric society and typical early 20th century erroneous notions about the capabilities of women – use a vaguely-described flying machine to reach the mountain area, landing on a hidden plateau. They are, of course, led by three young women – Celis, Alima, and Ellador – to the main settlement; the women treat them well and begin to teach them their own language, but it is clear that they are captives and not allowed to roam freely. Their first escape attempt is thwarted by Celis, Alima, and Ellador.

In captivity, the men learn that Herland, as they have started calling it, has been without men for two millennia, after a series of natural disasters and events orchestrated by men (wars and internal strife) combined to leave a small population of women alone on this hidden plateau in the mountains. As they adapt to these extreme circumstances, the women come to realize that cooperation is the only way they will survive, so they begin organizing their society based on cooperation rather than the male-centric basis of competition. Over time, the society they develop is efficient, effective, peaceful, and orderly – no crime, no competition, no antisocial behaviors. There are no separate families – just one giant organic community in which property is held in common and the care and education of children are the top priorities. Authority is based not on who one knows or to whom someone was born, but rather on experience, wisdom, and merit. The three travelers are eventually allowed to marry the three young women they encountered when they first arrived, but eventually Terry is exiled, and one of the women, Ellador, returns with her husband, Van, to the United States, along with Terry. Ellador is tasked to provide a report of life outside their peaceful country.

As an aside, the Kindle version of this book I bought seems to have been badly translated from another language to English or cobbled together badly via Captcha given that the book is likely in the public domain – curious, since Ms. Gilman was an American feminist and the book was written in (American) English to begin with. The terrible translations made reading what should have been a very quick read arduous and tedious. For example, everywhere the word “about” must have been in the original, the translation used “approximately”, which led to some weird sentences. Syntax, idiomatic expressions, and even sentence structure suffered mightily. If it were only some errors, it would have been tolerable, but almost every paragraph required thought as to what might have been meant. It’s abominable that I paid for a Kindle book that was essentially unreadable. I had to find a paperback copy to finish it. It could have been a book read in one sitting; instead I labored with it for the better part of a day and a half before locating a paperback copy. Because of this experience that has nothing to do with the writing itself (had I read it as it had been written), I might have overcompensated in my rating. It was a solid two stars placed in the context of its original publication and an extra star for the originality of thought also in the context of its time of publication, but the writing was average.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
bschweiger | 68 outras críticas | Feb 4, 2024 |
I remember liking this when I read it in school. Time to return.
 
Assinalado
Jenniferforjoy | 143 outras críticas | Jan 29, 2024 |

Listas

1910s (1)
1890s (1)
Utopia (1)

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Virginia Woolf Contributor
Emily Brontë Contributor
John Webster Contributor
Anne Brontë Contributor
Theodor Fontane Contributor
Jane Austen Contributor
Gustave Flaubert Contributor
Leo Tolstoy Contributor
Jonathan Swift Contributor
Marcel Proust Contributor
Bram Stoker Contributor
Victor Hugo Contributor
Dante Alighieri Contributor
Alexandre Dumas Contributor
Stendhal Contributor
Lewis Carroll Contributor
Louisa May Alcott Contributor
Charlotte Brontë Contributor
E. M. Forster Contributor
George Eliot Contributor
D. H. Lawrence Contributor
Theodore Dreiser Contributor
Henry Fielding Contributor
Joseph Conrad Contributor
George Sand Contributor
Blaise Pascal Contributor
Honoré de Balzac Contributor
Nikolai Gogol Contributor
Sir Walter Scott Contributor
Gaston Leroux Contributor
Sun Tzu Contributor
Ambrose Bierce Contributor
O'Henry Contributor
Frank Stockton Contributor
Stephen Crane Contributor
William Faulkner Contributor
Edith Wharton Contributor
James Thurber Contributor
Carl Stephenson Contributor
Ernest Hemingway Contributor
Shirley Jackson Contributor
E. F. Benson Contributor
Ralph Adams Cram Contributor
Dick Donovan Contributor
Elizabeth Gaskell Contributor
William Mudford Contributor
Sheridan Le Fanu Contributor
Maggie O'Farrell Introduction
Kate Bolick Introduction
Ann J. Lane Introduction, Editor
Sara Barkat Illustrator
Sabine Wilhelm Translator
Amy Aronson Introduction
Sheryl L. Meyering Introduction
Michael Kimmel Introduction
Steve Renwick Cover designer
Tithi Luadthong Cover artist
Xe Sands Narrator

Estatísticas

Obras
134
Also by
75
Membros
12,319
Popularidade
#1,902
Avaliação
3.9
Críticas
349
ISBN
756
Línguas
18
Marcado como favorito
21

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