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Daniel Keyes (1927–2014)

Autor(a) de Flowers for Algernon

20+ Works 16,626 Membros 402 Críticas 17 Favorited
There are 3 open discussions about this author. See now.

About the Author

Daniel Keyes was born in Brooklyn, New York on August 9, 1927. He received a bachelor's degree in psychology in 1950 and a master's degree in English literature in 1961 from Brooklyn College. He was an editor for pulp fiction magazines, taught English in New York City public schools, and was an mostrar mais English and creative writing professor at Wayne State University and Ohio University. In 1959, his novella Flowers for Algernon was published in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction and won the Hugo Award for best short fiction in 1960. By 1966 he had expanded the story into a novel with the same title, which tied for the Nebula Award for best novel that year. The novel was adapted as a stage play, developed as a dramatic musical, and adapted into a movie entitled Charly for which Cliff Robertson won the Academy Award for best actor. During his lifetime, he wrote several more novels including The Touch, The Fifth Sally, and Until Death. His three nonfiction books include The Minds of Billy Milligan, The Milligan Wars: A True-Story Sequel, and Unveiling Claudia. He also wrote a memoir entitled Algernon, Charlie and I. He died from complications of pneumonia on June 15, 2014 at the age of 86. (Bowker Author Biography) mostrar menos

Obras por Daniel Keyes

Associated Works

The Hugo Winners: Volumes One and Two (1972) — Contribuidor — 697 exemplares
The Hugo Winners: Volume One (1955-1961) (1962) — Contribuidor — 313 exemplares
Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Treasury (1988) — Contribuidor — 246 exemplares
The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction: 9th Series (1961) — Contribuidor — 151 exemplares
5th Annual Edition: The Year's Best S-F (1960) — Contribuidor — 146 exemplares
Flowers for Algernon (play) (1969) — Based on the novel by — 131 exemplares
Space Mail (1980) — Contribuidor — 130 exemplares
The Road to Science Fiction #4: From Here To Forever (1982) — Autor — 127 exemplares
Those Who Can: A Science Fiction Reader (1960) — Contribuidor — 122 exemplares
Nebula Awards Showcase 2001 (2001) — Contribuidor — 101 exemplares
Stories of Suspense (1963) — Contribuidor — 70 exemplares
Best SF Four (1961) — Contribuidor — 65 exemplares
The Frozen Planet and Four Other Science-Fiction Novellas (1966) — Contribuidor — 57 exemplares
The Best from Fantasy and Science Fiction: 10th Series (1961) — Contribuidor — 48 exemplares
Introductory Psychology through Science Fiction (1974) — Contribuidor — 44 exemplares
Charly [1968 film] (1968) — Original book — 15 exemplares
Science fiction verhalen [1969] — Contribuidor, algumas edições13 exemplares
SF Inventing the Future (1972) — Contribuidor — 11 exemplares
Østenfor sol : 38 fantastiske fortellinger fra hele verden (1969) — Contribuidor — 11 exemplares
Galaxy Science Fiction 1958 August, Vol. 16, No. 4 (1958) — Contribuidor — 7 exemplares
Life Styles (2001) — Contribuidor — 5 exemplares
Otte Science Fiction Noveller — Autor, algumas edições2 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Membros

Discussions

Found: Romance set in Greece em Name that Book (Abril 2023)
Which Fine Press is doing Flowers for Algernon? em Fine Press Forum (Março 2023)
Second Round: A Flower for Algernon by Daniel Keyes em Consensus Press (Outubro 2022)
True Crime Drug Related Murders em Name that Book (Julho 2013)
Has anyone read this book em Book talk (Janeiro 2012)

Críticas

I want to read this again. I read for school either in junior or high school and remember it made me cry.
 
Assinalado
jazzbird61 | 379 outras críticas | Feb 29, 2024 |
I have been lucky enough to read a succession of great books recently but this tops the lot. Daniel Keyes’ humble story embodies why I read: for the transcendent feelings you get when a great story unfolds, leading you to consider a new part of life - or a bit you knew about already but were unaware as to how complex and rich in experience it was. Flowers for Algernon made me feel that. It taught me about ignorance and knowledge, about what intelligence may or may not be, about what it is to be able to make your own choices and what it is to be a slave to experiences and trauma. I found myself exploring and deliberating over how cognisant and ‘awake’ I’d prefer to be as well as contemplating the passing of time, memory and death. For a relatively simplistic story (in essence a man of considerably low intelligence is given an operation that turns him into a genius) this is expertly crafted and rockets into my top 10 and is a sure fire 5/5.… (mais)
1 vote
Assinalado
Dzaowan | 379 outras críticas | Feb 15, 2024 |
It is said greatest punishment in life is to have and lose. And I tend to agree with it. Loss is something that makes life difficult to a degree and if we cannot handle it then life gets very dark place.

For me this book strikes at two targets:

(a) Situation in which one reaches full potential in a short time span, and then loses it in the same rapid way and drops down to the levels where person is no longer able to figure out what did it actually lose (to make the tragedy even greater). This is what happens to Charlie. While his flight upward is very fast so is coming to terms with himself very difficult. And when he finally finds his place in the world he becomes aware he is to fall down with a helluva thud. And worse thing is - he wont even remember what he achieved and where did he fall from. To some this loss of oneself might seem weird and if that is the case I can only say, all the power to you , you never got dead drunk. That feeling of puzzlement, what happened situation is the greatest horror there is. Imagine losing almost all information related to few hours when you were drinking. Now apply it to Charlie who is losing tortuously slow (so he is aware of it) actual pieces of himself - horror indeed. Everything Charlie could be gets lost as time passes by, without any chance of recovery.

(b) Intellect is something that is treasured very much in our world. It is important but more important thing is human contact. What value is great intellectual force and ability if one sees all around him as strangers and starts treating them as objects? None. Human contact is what makes us humans and without this component life becomes only apathetic existence.

Both things strike even harder in last few years where old saying "homo homini lupus est" proved to be more rule than exception (like one would expect during conflicts). Level of hate and smugness present in people from the same area, and enforced by constant gaslighting, is incredible and causes division greater than it would be possible otherwise....ever...in history of the world. I have a feeling entire society is falling towards (under)ground level while losing even awareness of greatness it once stood on.

We follow Charlie from his rise from bottom to top of intellectual achievement only to find himself alone on that desolate peak because he just cannot establish human connections with anyone. He soon comes to terms that others are afraid of him (after all they knew him before the change, and feeling that some is intellectually below someone gives rise to fear and resentment). For the first time Charlie sees clearly how he was treated by people around him and this angers him. He was constantly ridiculed and this causes rage to seep out of him. But as time goes by he comes to conclusion that while kids jokes might have been very raw (as children's cruelty can often be) and people were often making jokes on his account, it was just the way people were coping with his condition and their inner fears when communicating with him - scenes with his mother and sister were truly heartbreaking. As he starts falling down and losing one bit of himself at the time he ends where he started, everything he achieved lost. All, except perhaps Charlie's ever optimistic view of the world that made his life bearable in the first place (thankfulness to be able even for a short span to live normal life, silver lining of sorts?)...... Tragedy.

Excellent book, not so much SF as a true human drama. Recommended.

Merged review:

It is said greatest punishment in life is to have and lose. And I tend to agree with it. Loss is something that makes life difficult to a degree and if we cannot handle it then life gets very dark place.

For me this book strikes at two targets:

(a) Situation in which one reaches full potential in a short time span, and then loses it in the same rapid way and drops down to the levels where person is no longer able to figure out what did it actually lose (to make the tragedy even greater). This is what happens to Charlie. While his flight upward is very fast so is coming to terms with himself very difficult. And when he finally finds his place in the world he becomes aware he is to fall down with a helluva thud. And worse thing is - he wont even remember what he achieved and where did he fall from. To some this loss of oneself might seem weird and if that is the case I can only say, all the power to you , you never got dead drunk. That feeling of puzzlement, what happened situation is the greatest horror there is. Imagine losing almost all information related to few hours when you were drinking. Now apply it to Charlie who is losing tortuously slow (so he is aware of it) actual pieces of himself - horror indeed. Everything Charlie could be gets lost as time passes by, without any chance of recovery.

(b) Intellect is something that is treasured very much in our world. It is important but more important thing is human contact. What value is great intellectual force and ability if one sees all around him as strangers and starts treating them as objects? None. Human contact is what makes us humans and without this component life becomes only apathetic existence.

Both things strike even harder in last few years where old saying "homo homini lupus est" proved to be more rule than exception (like one would expect during conflicts). Level of hate and smugness present in people from the same area, and enforced by constant gaslighting, is incredible and causes division greater than it would be possible otherwise....ever...in history of the world. I have a feeling entire society is falling towards (under)ground level while losing even awareness of greatness it once stood on.

We follow Charlie from his rise from bottom to top of intellectual achievement only to find himself alone on that desolate peak because he just cannot establish human connections with anyone. He soon comes to terms that others are afraid of him (after all they knew him before the change, and feeling that some is intellectually below someone gives rise to fear and resentment). For the first time Charlie sees clearly how he was treated by people around him and this angers him. He was constantly ridiculed and this causes rage to seep out of him. But as time goes by he comes to conclusion that while kids jokes might have been very raw (as children's cruelty can often be) and people were often making jokes on his account, it was just the way people were coping with his condition and their inner fears when communicating with him - scenes with his mother and sister were truly heartbreaking. As he starts falling down and losing one bit of himself at the time he ends where he started, everything he achieved lost. All, except perhaps Charlie's ever optimistic view of the world that made his life bearable in the first place (thankfulness to be able even for a short span to live normal life, silver lining of sorts?)...... Tragedy.

Excellent book, not so much SF as a true human drama. Recommended.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Zare | 379 outras críticas | Jan 23, 2024 |
Fascinant et poignant.
 
Assinalado
marievictoire | 379 outras críticas | Jan 12, 2024 |

Listas

1960s (1)

Prémios

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Estatísticas

Obras
20
Also by
29
Membros
16,626
Popularidade
#1,362
Avaliação
4.1
Críticas
402
ISBN
212
Línguas
21
Marcado como favorito
17

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