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Karen Lord

Autor(a) de The Best of All Possible Worlds

17+ Works 1,894 Membros 122 Críticas 2 Favorited

About the Author

Image credit: Karen Lord, author photo by Russell Watson

Séries

Obras por Karen Lord

Associated Works

Reach for Infinity (2014) — Contribuidor — 141 exemplares
The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 2 (2017) — Contribuidor — 104 exemplares
The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2021 (2021) — Contribuidor — 97 exemplares
Bridging Infinity (1783) — Contribuidor — 62 exemplares
The Bestiary (2016) — Contribuidor — 58 exemplares
Luminescent Threads: Connections to Octavia E. Butler (2017) — Contribuidor — 58 exemplares
The Best of World SF: 2 (2022) — Contribuidor — 34 exemplares
Take Us to a Better Place: Stories (2018) — Contribuidor — 33 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Membros

Críticas

In as much as it turns out that this is the third book in a loose series, I probably did myself no favors by not reading "The Best of All Possible Worlds" and "The Galaxy Game" first, at least for the back story of one of the main characters, and the interstellar context in which this tale of First Contact is taking place. Still, I enjoyed this novel, and find it rather old school in terms of its economy and getting to the conceptual point. That economy is also appreciated in what is something of a political thriller, as Lord keeps the momentum going in terms of how her game is going to play out.… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Shrike58 | 3 outras críticas | Apr 2, 2024 |
Unexpected and sometimes unfamiliar. The cold, careful procedures of a biotechnician employed by the government mix with the warmth of friendships and romance.

I never felt like I got to know the secondary characters well-enough, and some of the sub-plots seem to jump into the story for no more reason than to say "Hi!" and jump back out, but there were moments that really resonated with me.
 
Assinalado
AdioRadley | 43 outras críticas | Jan 21, 2024 |
I usually don't give confusing books such a high score. And, I never realized that fantasy/mythological literature could be so confusing and vague at times. I read this book slowly over several days, stopping at key points in the book (and it is divided into three sections, which does help.) I tried to digest everything learned so that I would not be at a loss for the next section. I loved the imagery (well, on a personal level; the dismemberment, spiders and death stuff were not my cup of tea), and how my brain had to work to piece together new information with old information. At the end of the story, I am still not sure what the relationship of Dr. Miranda Ecouvo and Chance by the end of the story, as well as Chance's and The Trickster's relationship between the two of them, as well. I do understand how the author's background in physics could allow her to imagine complicated physical properties of the earth, and how one could enter and leave the earth through an invisible curtain. A lot of the imagery seemed to be Bible-based, though, but in inaccurate way to explain their "reality" to a Christian like me. However, I could put my beliefs aside to truly enjoy this a fantasy story. I would not hand this to someone with mental issues. The issues presented in the story are disturbing enough to the average person. Sometimes, the imagery was amazing, though. I had researched the title to see if another author had used it (yes), and I had thought Labyrinth or Labyrinths matched the book cover better (but both of those titles were taken, as well.) Spiders and webs were also mentioned frequently enough in the book that I could have seen this as titled "Tangled Webs" (also another title already taken) or something indicating conflict. At times, I felt close to different characters for different reasons. I would hope there is a sequel to this book, continuing with Miranda and Chase. Something is there. I am not sure what. That relationship could be explained in so many ways, or at least this book has made my vision imaginative as well. I was a #rifwinner (Read It Forward) of this interesting book!… (mais)
 
Assinalado
doehlberg63 | 2 outras críticas | Dec 2, 2023 |
Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with this book.

"The Blue, Beautiful World" by Karen Lord is a captivating and thought-provoking novel that takes readers on a lyrical journey through a world both familiar and fantastical. With her exquisite prose and imaginative storytelling, Karen Lord crafts a tale that seamlessly blends elements of magical realism, social commentary, and deeply human experiences.

Set in a world much like our own but infused with magical occurrences, the story follows the lives of three protagonists: Sadie, a curious and adventurous teenager; Franny, a gifted artist grappling with the loss of her muse; and Ambrose, a scientist with a penchant for exploring the boundaries of reality. Their lives intersect in unexpected ways as they navigate a world where inexplicable phenomena known as "the Blue" challenge conventional understanding.

One of the novel's strengths lies in Karen Lord's ability to create a vivid and enchanting atmosphere. Her descriptive language paints scenes that come alive in the reader's mind, evoking emotions and sensations that resonate long after the pages are turned. Whether she's describing the ethereal beauty of the Blue or the mundane yet profound moments of her characters' lives, Lord's writing captivates and immerses.

At its heart, "The Blue, Beautiful World" delves into themes of interconnectedness, wonder, and the interplay between the known and the unknown. The Blue itself serves as a metaphor for the mysteries that exist beyond our comprehension, inviting readers to ponder the limits of human understanding and the awe-inspiring vastness of the universe.

The characters are wonderfully crafted, each carrying their own burdens and desires. Their journeys are not just about unraveling the enigma of the Blue, but also about discovering themselves and forging connections with others. The reader is invited to witness their personal growth, failures, and moments of triumph, making the characters relatable and endearing.

Moreover, the novel deftly touches on societal issues such as climate change, the ethics of scientific exploration, and the impact of human actions on the environment. These themes are seamlessly woven into the narrative, prompting readers to reflect on their own responsibilities in the real world.

While "The Blue, Beautiful World" is a captivating read, some readers might find its blend of genres and metaphysical themes challenging. The novel's deliberate ambiguity regarding certain plot elements might frustrate those seeking clear-cut explanations, but it also encourages readers to embrace the mystery and draw their own conclusions.

In conclusion, Karen Lord's "The Blue, Beautiful World" is a mesmerizing tapestry of storytelling that weaves together the magical and the mundane, the known and the unknown. With its poetic prose, multi-dimensional characters, and thought-provoking themes, the novel leaves an indelible impression. It's a book that invites readers to explore the boundaries of imagination and offers a timely reminder of the beauty and complexity of the world around us.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
BenM2023 | 3 outras críticas | Nov 22, 2023 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
17
Also by
19
Membros
1,894
Popularidade
#13,588
Avaliação
½ 3.6
Críticas
122
ISBN
53
Línguas
2
Marcado como favorito
2

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