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Judith Moore (1) (1939–2006)

Autor(a) de Fat Girl: A True Story

Para outros autores com o nome Judith Moore, ver a página de desambiguação.

4 Works 725 Membros 22 Críticas

Obras por Judith Moore

Fat Girl: A True Story (2005) 646 exemplares
Never Eat Your Heart Out (1997) 70 exemplares
A Bad, Bad Boy (2009) 5 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Data de nascimento
1939-10-14
Data de falecimento
2006-05-15
Sexo
female
Nacionalidade
USA
Local de nascimento
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
Local de falecimento
Berkeley, California, USA
Causa da morte
cancer (colon)
Educação
Evergreen State College
Ocupações
memoirist
essayist
editor
freelance writer
Organizações
The San Diego Reader
Prémios e menções honrosas
Guggenheim Fellowship

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Judith Moore was born in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and claimed to have become an obese child, weighing 112 pounds, by second grade. She wrote a memoir of her childhood entitled Fat Girl: A True Story (2005). After her parents split up, she shuttled between her mother's apartment in Brooklyn and her maternal grandmother, who lived on a farm in Arkansas. Moore graduated from Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington and lived much of her adult life in Berkeley, California. In the early 1980s, she began to submit freelance book reviews and essays to weekly newspapers in the area. These pieces were collected and published in her first book as The Left Coast of Paradise: California and the American Heart (1987). Her second book, Never Eat Your Heart Out (1998) focused on her relationship with food. As a journalist, Moore wrote mostly for The San Diego Reader, a weekly publication, specializing in book reviews and offbeat feature subjects. She married and divorced twice, with two daughters. Moore died of colon cancer at age 66.

Membros

Críticas

This collection of essays was almost a five star rating for me. It was so well written that it made me want to touch the pages and savor every word. (Well, not every word, hence the four star and not five!) Of course, since I grew up on a farm, I could really relate to the essays about canning and gardening and butchering. The author's essay about going to the county fair made me relive all the time I spent preparing for and going to the Oldham County Fair. I could see and smell the barns, the garden exhibits and the grease that hung in the air from the screen-enclosed kitchen. I could see all the brownies and angel food cakes baked by 4-Hers eager to claim that coveted blue ribbon. I could see the canned tomatoes and green beans. No seeds should be visible in the tomatoes so the jars were handled with such care so as not to loosen any stray seed. Green beans for the fair were not snapped - they were cut into even segments and only the best and straightest went into the jars for display. We were always in search of the perfect green pepper with four even points on the bottom to display. And the judges looked not only at the outside of the garments, but also at the inside seams. It must look just as good on the inside as it does on the outside. The ultimate was winning the chance to exhibit at the State Fair, where the competition was steeper and the pride even greater. The author talks about the Rodeo Queen - we had the Farm Bureau Queen.

This book brought back all those memories and smells and tastes of the fair. It also beautifully illustrated how hard it is to "go home," and see both how things have changed and how they have remained the same. I feel like I had forgotten many things about that part of my life, but this book was a gentle and sentimental reminder. I enjoyed it!
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
TheresaCIncinnati | 1 outra crítica | Aug 17, 2015 |
A short but blunt memoir. The author states clearly at the beginning that this is no "Happy Ending" story. That she was fat and still is and no man came and swept her off her feet after she slimmed to a thin size. This book is raw and real and almost hard to read because of how [no matter your size] easy it is to relate to how she feels about her body.

This book is as real as it gets with body talk. Her descriptions of living encased in a fat body are sharp, poignant, sad and familiar. Her descriptions of food will make your mouth water, your stomach growl and your heart ache.

It's an easy, quick and rewarding read.

Favorite Quotes:

1) "Even when I was slender, I was fat". Oh by, does that one resonate painfully true.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
tealightful | 19 outras críticas | Sep 24, 2013 |
i have a feeling that this could have been really good, but it just wasn't.

i kept thinking, well, what about all that? what about it?

the author makes a point to let us know she's not about analyzing - that it's the reader's job - but this book is so clearly unfinished, the ending so carelessly chopped, that it makes me afraid of her other books.
 
Assinalado
usefuljack | 19 outras críticas | May 17, 2013 |
i have a feeling that this could have been really good, but it just wasn't.

i kept thinking, well, what about all that? what about it?

the author makes a point to let us know she's not about analyzing - that it's the reader's job - but this book is so clearly unfinished, the ending so carelessly chopped, that it makes me afraid of her other books.
 
Assinalado
usefuljack | 19 outras críticas | May 17, 2013 |

Prémios

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Estatísticas

Obras
4
Membros
725
Popularidade
#35,032
Avaliação
½ 3.3
Críticas
22
ISBN
29

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