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Regina PorterCríticas

Autor(a) de The Travelers

2 Works 233 Membros 10 Críticas

Críticas

Mostrando 10 de 10
Entertaining reading, even with the overwhelming cast of characters, until the dog is murdered - that was it! Enough of "The Dog Dies."

Surely, there must be a better way to move a plot, non?
 
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m.belljackson | 9 outras críticas | Sep 4, 2023 |
** : Difficile de parcourir l'histoire d'un pays en 300 pages. Restent ces morceaux de vie qui se croisent. On parcourt le livre comme un album photos. C'est tendre, léger et bien écrit.
 
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Eliseur | 9 outras críticas | Jan 2, 2021 |
I would have awarded higher but thought the plotting was eventually just too fragmented and the cast of characters too large.
 
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adrianburke | 9 outras críticas | Nov 1, 2020 |
This quietly spectacular debut novel revolves in concentric circles around two white families, two Black families, and the narrows where they intersect. Each chapter builds on the events and the meetings in both earlier and later times. The Vietnam war has its impact, as does infidelity, rape, domestic violence, and parental neglect, but the overwhelming atmosphere is simultaneously solemn and joyous. Settings are as varied as the Bronx, Portsmouth, NH, Berlin, and Buckner Co, Georgia. Characters range from James Joyce scholars to crabmeat pickers to a Black woman pilot. Each coincidence and unlikely meeting comes as a delightful surprise, and each chapter could stand alone magnificently as a short story on its own. A must read.

Quotes:" I remember how still the room was when he died. How the air just left him and there was no difference between his corpse and the metal bed that held it."

"It's like once he says he's leaving he's got to follow through and they are both stuck on stubborn."
 
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froxgirl | 9 outras críticas | Oct 15, 2020 |
First is a book published last year, Regina Porter’s The Travelers, which takes us from the 1950s through Obama’s first year as president.

Porter travels back and forth in time, and she helpfully lists the Cast of Characters and their relationship to each other at the beginning of the novel. At the beginning of each chapter she shares the year that chapter covers.

James Vincent Jr. is a successful Manhattan lawyer, who has a son by his first wife Sigrid. Sigrid takes their son Rufus and moves to California, and James remarries. He also has a son by his occasional mistress, but this is not acknowledged by anyone.

Rufus marries Claudia, a black woman, whose mother Agnes was traumatized as a young woman, which led her to leave home and marry Eddie, who ends up in Vietnam, serving on a naval ship with his cousins. The men make a decision on that ship that will haunt Eddie.

The character who interested me most was Eloise, who was in love with Agnes and devastated when Agnes rebuffed her. Eloise was obsessed with Bessie Coleman, a black aviatrix, and wanted nothing more than to learn how to fly.

The families’ stories intersect over generations, and it’s fascinating to see how Porter weaves all of her characters stories together and how strong the pull towards home is for all. I highly recommend it.
1 vote
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bookchickdi | 9 outras críticas | Jul 7, 2020 |
Very unique novel - basically a time-fluid collection of interlaced short stories about families that have intersected through the last half-century.
1 vote
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bookwyrmm | 9 outras críticas | Feb 7, 2020 |
Totaal niet boeiend. Gestopt op pag. 50½
 
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huizenga | 9 outras críticas | Dec 16, 2019 |
This powerful novel reminds me of Tommy Orange's There,There. In both books the author shares the different lives of numerous characters, providing in sum what life was like for a group of people -- in this case, African-Americans from the South over a period of some fifty years. When people say that you never know what burden someone else may be carrying, that thought is captured in this book. Some people have committed horrendous acts and paid for it dearly, others have been the victims of similarly terrible acts and have also paid for it dearly. As my mother would say, "Life is rough." Or as the novel concludes,
"We're here. Dig in."
1 vote
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PatsyMurray | 9 outras críticas | Sep 1, 2019 |
Enjoying The Travelers by Regina Porter really comes down to what kind of reader you are: one who prefers a linear narrative with fully fleshed characters who fall easily and precisely into said narrative, or one who can appreciate something else. The Travelers definitely falls into the latter. Sprawling does not even begin to describe the sheer quantity of characters (as evidenced by the three pages list at the beginning of the book), time frames and locales visited. Eventually, everyone links in some way as Porter weaves a larger and larger web around the last 50 years of US history with the years highlighted at the beginning of chapters as road maps. It is impossible to summarize a book like this since it covers nearly everything a book can be about--love, race, family, class, and belonging. As a reader who very much enjoys that something else, I found The Travelers engaging and well worth the effort.
3 vote
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Hccpsk | 9 outras críticas | Aug 15, 2019 |
I was really intrigued by this novel after reading some of the reviews; however, I gave up after finding it too difficult to keep up with the numerous characters and a confusing time line. The long list of characters at the beginning should have been helpful, but even that required time spent flipping back and forth, and added to my disengagement.
1 vote
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pdebolt | 9 outras críticas | Jul 29, 2019 |
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