Picture of author.

Joan G. Robinson (1910–1988)

Autor(a) de If Jesus Came to My House

37+ Works 1,186 Membros 11 Críticas

About the Author

Disambiguation Notice:

(eng) Joan Gale Thomas was born in 1910 in Gerrard's Cross, Buckinghamshire, England. She studied art at the Chelsea Illustrators Studio. After illustrating books for other authors, she wrote and illustrated her first book A Stands for Angel in 1939. In 1941, she married Richard Robinson, also an author and illustrator and began writing books under the name of Joan Gale Robinson.

Image credit: Joan G. Robinson

Séries

Obras por Joan G. Robinson

If Jesus Came to My House (1600) 542 exemplares
When Marnie Was There (1967) 235 exemplares
Charley, or The Girl Who Ran Away (1969) 71 exemplares
The Teddy Robinson Storybook (2000) — Autor — 68 exemplares
More About Teddy Robinson (1954) 38 exemplares
Dear Teddy Robinson (1966) 36 exemplares
Teddy Robinson Stories (1953) 26 exemplares
Keeping Up with Teddy Robinson (1964) 19 exemplares
Teddy Robinson Himself (1974) 15 exemplares
If I'd been born in Bethlehem (1953) 14 exemplares
Mary-Mary (2013) 13 exemplares
The Dark House of the Sea Witch (1979) 11 exemplares
Mary-Mary Stories (1968) 11 exemplares
Hundreds and Hundreds (1984) — Contribuidor — 8 exemplares
Our Father (1950) 7 exemplares
Christmas Angel (1978) 6 exemplares
Dissection of the locust (1963) 6 exemplares
More Mary-Mary (1973) 5 exemplares
Ten Little Angels (1951) 5 exemplares
Where is God? (1959) 4 exemplares
Sea Witch (Beaver Books) (1981) 4 exemplares
One Little Baby (1956) 4 exemplares
The House in the Square (1972) — Autor — 3 exemplares
God of all things (1948) 3 exemplares
Teddy Robinson's Second Omnibus (1974) 3 exemplares
Teddy Robinson (1954) 2 exemplares
Meg and Maxie (1978) 1 exemplar
Damals mit Marnie 1 exemplar

Associated Works

When Marnie Was There [2014 film] (2014) — Original book — 106 exemplares
The Adventures of Uncle Lubin (1902)algumas edições66 exemplares
Tales of Betsy-May (Rewards) (1940) — Ilustrador, algumas edições45 exemplares
Open the Door (1965) — Contribuidor — 22 exemplares
Marnie of memories, Vol.2 (2003) — Original book — 1 exemplar
The Night Before Christmas (Joan Gale Thomas) — Ilustrador — 1 exemplar

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Nome legal
Robinson, Joan Mary Gale
Outros nomes
Robinson, Joan G.
Thomas, Joan Gale (nee)
Data de nascimento
1910-02-10
Data de falecimento
1988-08-20
Sexo
female
Nacionalidade
Royaume-Uni
Local de nascimento
Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire, Angleterre, Royaume-Uni
Local de falecimento
King's Lynn, Norfolk, Angleterre, Royaume-Uni
Ocupações
children's book author
Illustrator
Relações
Robinson, Richard Gavin (Epoux)
Nota de desambiguação
Joan Gale Thomas was born in 1910 in Gerrard's Cross, Buckinghamshire, England. She studied art at the Chelsea Illustrators Studio. After illustrating books for other authors, she wrote and illustrated her first book A Stands for Angel in 1939. In 1941, she married Richard Robinson, also an author and illustrator and began writing books under the name of Joan Gale Robinson.

Membros

Críticas

 
Assinalado
WBCLIB | 3 outras críticas | Feb 27, 2023 |
This book completely captured my heart. One of my favourites for a long, long time.
 
Assinalado
emmy_of_spines | 4 outras críticas | Sep 8, 2022 |
A gentle and charming ghost story set on the North Norfolk coast.

Anna is a lonely foster child, who feels very 'outside' the warm relationships of others. While convalescing on the Norfolk coast, she meets Marnie, also lonely and excluded, and the two become firm friends. There is a lovely sense of place with the marshes and the dunes. The explanations at the end come very thick and fast compared to the gentle pace of the rest of the book, and while they are a bit coincidental, they are satisfying. I think I will not walk down the staithe again without imagining Marnie, pale at the window!… (mais)
½
 
Assinalado
atreic | 4 outras críticas | Aug 19, 2020 |
”It was raining harder now and she was beginning to get wet, but it did not matter. She was warm inside. She turned and began running back along the dyke, thinking how strange it was—about being ‘inside’ or ‘outside’. It was nothing to do with there being other people, or whether you were ‘an only’, or one of a large family . . . she knew that now—it was something to do with how you were feeling inside yourself.”

Anna is around ten and absolutely friendless. Unable to connect with the other children at school or bond with the older foster parents she’s lived with for some years, she is profoundly unhappy. Her characteristic expression is the “ordinary” face: an appearance of indifference and haughty detachment. She hates the mother who left her to go off on a holiday with a second husband, only to die along with this man in a car crash, and she also hates the grandmother she was left with for dying soon after. After being away from school for two weeks, suffering from asthma that is likely psychosomatic in nature, Anna is sent by her foster parents, the Prestons, to stay with the Peggs, an endearing, warm couple who live in Little Overton in the fen country. The family doctor has stated that the air there may well do her good. It certainly makes more sense for her to be there than spend the last six weeks of term in the prison that is school.

Once in the marshy country, Anna is given an enviable degree of freedom. She explores the marshlands and is particularly compelled by a lovely old house that looks out onto the creek and the straithe. There is a strange, deep familiarity about this place, whose windows Anna sometimes believes to be watching her. Soon she will make the acquaintance of an unusual—magical or ghostly—girl. “Marnie”, who is just as lonely as Anna herself, lives in the mysterious house. The two will become each other’s best friend and will have several small adventures together, but then Marnie will quite suddenly depart, leaving Anna to question if the other girl is a figment of the imagination or a character from some strange dream.

When summer finally (officially) arrives, a lovely, friendly family with five children moves into the mysterious Marsh House. Their renovations of the old place bring to light a diary from long ago that will explain much about Marnie. The Lindsay family will also invite an elderly friend to stay. This woman, “Gillie”, lived in Little Overton as a child, and has fascinating stories to tell about the Marsh House and the lonely girl who lived there over fifty years before, during the time of the Great War. Anna will find her intuited connection to the house is based in her own family’s history.

When Marnie Was There is a lovely, atmospheric piece of children’s literature into which adults, too, can escape to rediscover some of the pain and pleasure of childhood. It is a story of feeling lonely and apart and of finally coming home.
… (mais)
1 vote
Assinalado
fountainoverflows | 4 outras críticas | Apr 20, 2018 |

Listas

Prémios

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Joan Aiken Contributor
Patricia Miles Contributor
Faith Jaques Contributor
Margaret Gordon Contributor
Ronald Ridout Contributor
Pauline Baynes Contributor
Marjorie Darke Contributor
Val Biro Contributor
Forrest Wilson Contributor
Gene Kemp Contributor
Edward Blishen Contributor
Diana Wynne Jones Contributor
John Rowe Townsend Contributor
Jan Mark Contributor
Rosemary Sutcliff Contributor
John Christopher Contributor
Terry Jones Contributor
Peter Dickinson Contributor
Helen Cresswell Contributor
Leon Garfield Contributor
Philippa Pearce Contributor
Shirley Hughes Contributor
Roger McGough Contributor
Quentin Blake Cover artist
Jan Pieńkowski Contributor
Nicholas Fisk Contributor
Clive King Contributor
Peggy Fortnum Illustrator

Estatísticas

Obras
37
Also by
6
Membros
1,186
Popularidade
#21,675
Avaliação
4.1
Críticas
11
ISBN
84
Línguas
5

Tabelas & Gráficos