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Assinalado
PatLibrary123 | Aug 9, 2022 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Would not recommend.
 
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INorris | 21 outras críticas | Jun 8, 2017 |
This book was purchased based on a recommendation from Amazon. Mrs. Schmidt has written a book from the heart and soul; her words paint a true picture of a Cape Cod town. This is a tale of the old vs. the new. Unless you have lived the life of the ancestors of our forefathers who have remained in the safehaven of the small town, you will be unable for feel all the emotions Schmidt has created for her characters.

Many small New England towns where ocean or lakes are their major source of income is dependent on their year round local citizens to be innovative during the off season. New Englanders are strong believers of the strength of the community. In the book, an elderly woman tells the protagnist Charlotte (a washashore)the story how she came to Wellfleet. She was an infant when she was placed on the steps of a church where the minister took her into his family and the entire village aid in her upbringing thus her name Ada Town.

One may find the story of the big bad rich out-of-towner, who attempts to take away the livehood of a number of the locals, to be contrived. This part is a sub plot of a love story of marriage, children, the land and a love that can never be. You can take this book to the beach but not as an easy read but to romance the surrounding of the sandy shore.
 
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Gingersnap000 | 21 outras críticas | May 30, 2012 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This was another sappy read, though well-written, the author just did not make me care about the characters. I think I just can not read any more books about unhappy married women. I don't feel sorry for them and their really is no plot line that will draw me in. I mostly wanted to read this because of the local and that part was nicely done, but if you aren't invested in the characters, then their really is no point.
 
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bookmagic | 21 outras críticas | Nov 28, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
i thought this book was hard to get into and i didn't care that much about the characters, but i do love stories located anywhere beachy so that was enough to keep me interested enough to finish it.
 
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dawnlovesbooks | 21 outras críticas | Nov 10, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
If you've ever been to Wellfleet, or outer Cape Cod, you'll realize Schmidt has captured the feeling of being there entirely, in it's glory and desolation. Charlotte, the main character and wonderfully written outsider, moves with her family to the Cape, determined to connect her solely cerebral husband to something from his past and elicit emotion from him if it kills her. She finds love in ways she didn't expect and couldn't pursue- the oysterman Darryl. Schmidt walks the line of love and obligation, family, class, and New England mentality with skill and grace. Lovely novel.
 
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amaryann21 | 21 outras críticas | Oct 3, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Charlotte Tradescombe's husband Henry inherits a family home on Cape Cod, and they uproot themselves from New York City to move there year-round. Charlotte is much younger than Henry and has her hands full with 3-year-old daughter Fiona. She befriends (which threatens to become more-than-friends) a local oyster farmer and gets involved in disputes about land and between townies and newcomers. The place seemed depressing, especially in winter, and I wanted to return to the city ASAP.
1 vote
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ennie | 21 outras críticas | Sep 11, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
From the book synopsis:

"Sensitive but practical, Charlotte Tradescome has come to accept the reticence of her older, work-obsessed husband Henry. Still, she hopes to create a life for their three-year-old daughter. So when Henry inherits a home on Cape Cod, she, Henry, and little Fiona move from their Manhattan apartment to this seaside community. Charlotte sells off part of Tradescome Point, inadvertently fueling the conflict between newcomers and locals. Many townspeople easily dismiss Charlotte as a "washashore." A rare exception is Darryl Stead, an oyster farmer with modest dreams and an open heart, with whom Charlotte feels the connection she's been missing. Ultimately he transforms the way she sees herself, the town, and the people she loves..."

The story dragged a bit at first but by the end, I was caught up in the lives of townspeople of Wellfleet.

The "flirtation" between Charlotte and Darryl left me feeling a bit squeemish and I was a bit surprised at how the book ended. I did not particular care for the main characters, Charlotte and Henry. I kept thinking that if the two of them were so unhappy with the other, why didn't they just get divorced? Even at the end, I felt as though Charlotte was just lucky and dodged a bullet; not that Henry discovered that he loved his wife all of the sudden.

All in all, it was an OK read.
1 vote
Assinalado
WifeMomKnitter | 21 outras críticas | Aug 25, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book is seriously disappointing. Before I noticed that it was available through Early Reviewers, I'd added it to my reading list for the summer. I had seen some good reviews for it, and thought it sounded right up my alley.

But I pretty much hated it. There's very little of the actual house in the book (save for some paper ripping, and references to painting), and that was disappointing. The portraits of the characters seem incomplete somehow. And anyhow, I hated the main character. I hated the choices she made, I hated the way she acted, and I hated the thin love thing that she had going on with a man not her husband. Frankly, I hated the husband too, and I wanted her to leave him, regardless of the illicit love.

I can't in good faith recommend this book, and I know I only finished it because I felt obliged to. Sad.
 
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manogirl | 21 outras críticas | Aug 23, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book focuses on Charlotte Tradescome and her struggles with her young daughter and older husband. There were parts of this book that I didn't care for but there were others that the imagery was very vivid and I could picture it. At first I wasn't sure if I was going to like it but in the end it got better.
 
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schmapp | 21 outras críticas | Aug 18, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
My library has a "Romance" sticker on this book, but I disagree. It is about love, but not the man meets woman and falls in love sort. Instead, it is the love found in a marriage, for a child, for another man, and about finding one's spot in the world. The book centers around Charlotte Tradescome, her older work obsessed husband, Henry and their daughter, Fiona. When Henry inherits some waterview land on Cape Cod, Charlotte moves them from Manhattan to the old, creaky house where Henry grew up. But as big city people moving to a fishing town and a decaying way of life they are not exactly welcome. But slowly, and not always successfully, Charlotte begins to develop love for this new place they call home.
 
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punxsygal | 21 outras críticas | Aug 8, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book provided an enjoyable Summer reading experience. It got off to a bit of a slow start, but that might have been because I didn't have time to sit and read much when I first started it. The characters were realistic, for the most part. The author was a bit relentless about reiterating some of the characters' flaws.

I liked the way Charlotte's character developed, and the lessons she learned were key to my enjoyment of this book. The writing is spare yet descriptive at the same time. It evoked a time and space I felt familiar with, though I haven't been to Cape Cod in over twenty years. It made me want to pay a visit to that area sooner rather than later. I would recommend this book to many (but not all) of my reading friends.
 
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clamairy | 21 outras críticas | Aug 3, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I loved this story! Novels set on the eastern seaboard are among my favorites, and this one did not disappoint. Although I grew up in a small town in Michigan and not Massachusetts, the people are the same. Everyone knows everyone. Family trees twist in and out of each other in intricacies only locals would understand. Loyalties and betrayals span decades and are never really forgotten. This is the backdrop for Heidi Jon Schmidt’s story where the reader is reminded of the effect an individual decision can have on others... in this case a whole community. Charlotte's innocuous-seeming decision to move to Oyster Point, and the need to sell part of her husband's land to accomplish this, sets in motion huge ramifications for the local oyster farmers and sides are quickly taken. Complicating matters further is the attraction between Charlotte and Darryl and the friction and apathy in Charlotte's marriage to Henry. The author's descriptive style made me know the characters and see their surroundings. A well-told story of interpersonal relationships on many levels, I recommend it!
 
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ellasmeme | 21 outras críticas | Jul 29, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
**This is an advance reading copy provided by Library Thing**

Love can cause us to do some really dumb shit. Take Charlotte for example. Emotional, naive, and needy Charlotte fell in love with an idea--the romantic notion that she could somehow emotionally connect with and save Henry Tradescombe, the distant, reclusive, excessively liberal, and aggressive intellectual of some noted repute as a journalist. In return, Charlotte would be sculpted and molded by Henry, who is twenty years her senior, and gain entree into the world of the New York intellectual elite. What she gets instead is a petulant and sadistic husband who worries more about global warming, the Bush administration, and quoting obscure poets than he does about his own wife or daughter. Of course, Charlotte doesn't come to realize this until years later. She is resigned to her fate, however, because she at least has her four year old daughter, Fiona, and a life that, however emotionally starved it may be, is one of comfortable wealth and reputation that many would envy.

Charlotte's life is thrown into upheaval, however, when Henry inherits his family estate on Cape Cod and Charlotte, in a sudden act of defiance against Henry's neglect, takes the reins and moves the family to the house of Henry's childhood. While adapting to life on the New England coast, Charlotte meets Darryl Stead, an oyster farmer and jack of all trades who--you guessed it--"completes her." Now Charlotte is torn between her obligation to her marriage and her longing for Darryl. To complicate matters, by selling off a piece of the property to a wealthy prick, she may have single-handedly destroyed the entire economic system upon which Darryl and the other oyster farmers depend. Ain't love grand?

Some things I liked:

1) Schmidt perfectly captures the distrust of newcomers (especially of a higher socio-economic class) inherent in rural small-town America. The town of Wellfleet closes ranks against Charlotte when it becomes evident that she wants to be part of the community, believing that her romantic notion of pastoral life is just a whim that she can indulge in because her wealth allows her to try on lifestyles as easily as trying on designer clothing.

2) The characters are, for the most part, realistic. There were some stereotyped town eccentrics, but Schmidt does an excellent job of portraying the inner-life of a woman who worries that she may have made the wrong choices in life and it may be too late to do anything about that without destroying the web of relationships that are delicately attached to her. Her struggle between what's right for her family and what's right for her is real and authentic. I can even see how she would fall for Henry, ass though he is. Who hasn't had the "crush on teacher" syndrome, however fleetingly? It's just that most of us have these crushes while we're still in high school and are thus jailbait to the object of our affection (which tends to effectively thwart any romantic entanglements).

3) This is a nice "slice of life" book that avoids depicting life on Cape Cod as quaint and idealistic. Schmidt shows the back-breaking labor, the desperation, and the poverty of families just trying to make ends meet. These are the people who are left behind everytime the tourist season ends to face the bleak realities of winter and survival. It was also interesting to read about life in a New England fishing community, a place to which I have never been, and Schmidt provides just the right amount of detail in this respect.

4) The novel avoids the cliched ending that I thought it was careening toward and had a more mature, realistic resolution that I expected. That's all I'll say other than I thought the ending was perfect and satisfying.

Some things I didn't like:

1) Despite all her protestations to the contrary, I saw Charlotte's attraction to Darryl as a repeat of what had happened years earlier with Henry. Again, Charlotte is in love with the idea more than the man; this time she's in love with the hard-working, salt-of-the-earth, brawny shouldered working class man who will take her away from her stilted marriage and awaken passion in her that she's never known (okay, it doesn't say that, but I was getting strong whiffs of this stank with or without it being directly stated). Darryl is damaged goods and Charlotte has set herself up to once again save the man who can't be saved--which she spends the better half of the novel doing. To which I could only shake my head and think, "Stupid girl."

2) Some disjointed leaps in time and sudden, unexpected switches in the point of view made it somewhat confusing. Not overly so, but just enough to irritate the piss out of me as I tried to pick up the thread of the narrative once again.

3) Every time Charlotte and Darryl had one of their heart-to-heart talks, the dialogue read like a trite script submitted to Lifetime. For your groaning pleasure:

"I just want to come over there and drag you up the stairs and . . . make love to you. . . . " He spoke so roughly she likely should have been frightened, but naturally she was thrilled.

"I want you just as badly! I think about you all the time. I think, if we'd met each other when we were younger . . . but . . . "

"If you knew me back then you'd have spit in my face."

"I'd have made love to you like it was my religion."


Puke, buzzard, puke. Nothing triggers my gag reflex like this kind of romantic nonsense. (Granted, my idea of romance is a little along the lines of Ash in Army of Darkness saying "Gimme some sugar, baby" while revving up the chainsaw that has replaced his arm. But I digress.)

Overall, this is a quick, enjoyable read when Charlotte and Darryl aren't trading sweet nothings. Because Schmidt has done so many other things so well in the novel, I'm willing to forgive that.
1 vote
Assinalado
snat | 21 outras críticas | Jul 19, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I'm so grateful that I received an Early Reviewer copy of this book. First, I'm a huge fan of books set on the east coast, by the sea. The characters of "The House on Oyster Creek" are at times, heart-wrenching, but always, true to themselves and highly likable. I quickly grew to care about their lives, their loves, and the ultimate outcome of the main conflicts in this well written story.
 
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kitkeller | 21 outras críticas | Jul 8, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
There were good times and bad in this book. One comment on the book was 'Expertly explores the complexities of domestic life and the tug of forbidden love.' If I had not received this as an Early Reader Giveaway, I might not have chosen it off the shelf. This puts me at a disadvantage, as romance novels are not my love. Anyway that above statement pretty well covers the book for me....I did not believe some of the characters. The Idea of Charlotte being with Henry and having Fiona with him did not ring true with me. Other parts of the book were right on. Fitting in with the locals. Getting caught up in the law suit of the very man Charlotte sells the land to who tries to ruin the oysterman she loves and never shows any responsibility for...It caught me in places and dropped me in others.
 
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Kikoa | 21 outras críticas | Jul 2, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
The House on Oyster Creek was an Early Reviewers book.

Charlotte Tradescombe is married to an older man, while both of them have writing careers, he is very snobbish and puts Charlotte's career down. they have a young child, who he behaves very coldly toward.
Henry, the husband inherits a home in Wellfleet, MA, an oyster farming community, and at Charlotte's insistence, they move to Cape Cod..
The community is slow to welcome newcomers, even though Henry's family has owned the house for generations.the author does a wonderful jb of describing the culture of the oyster farmers, and describing the culture on the cape. The difference in culture and attitude between the year round Cape dwellers and the summer people.

I love the way all the characters are transformed through the story. While the story didn't end the way I wished, it ended in a much better way. Good for you Heidi Jon Schmidt. I wasn't finished with these characters when I finished the book. That is one of the best ways for me to end a book, wishing for just a little more....

.
1 vote
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alicetroxel | 21 outras críticas | Jun 29, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
The author draws you into this story from the begining. Charlotte Tradescome is a lonely wife with a small daughter who yearns for the adventure the house on Tradescome Point will provide. Left to her husband after his father's death, Charlotte decides she and her daughter will move there with of without Henry. After the move we begin to see what makes the characters of this book tick and you start to feel for even the seeminly most miserable character. The auther does a great job in telling this tale and making you feel for each and every character in the story, even those that died before the stories start. This was a great read and a fast paced book. I found I wanted more when the book ended.½
 
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Britt1075 | 21 outras críticas | Jun 26, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
The House On Oyster Creek is a story about the hard working oyster farmers and townspeople in Cape Cod, Massachusetts. There is also a second part of the story about a legal battle over the right to farm oysters there. There are many vivid descriptions of the beautiful landscape and the resident's way of life. The Tradescome family moves there from New York to a house they inherited. Charlotte wants to raise her daughter in a quiet place away from the city. The relationship between Charlotte and her husband Henry is somewhat unbelievable. Henry is cold, obsessed with his writing career, and shows barely any emotion or feelings at all toward his wife and daughter. He thinks he is intellectually superior to almost everyone. Charlotte is a sensitive and caring person who is basically longing for love. How they ended up together I don't understand. When they arrive they are almost hated by all the townspeople except for one oyster farmer who works the waters across from their house. Darryl is one of the only people in town that will talk to them and after spending a little time together Charlotte and he start to fall in love. She sees in him the man that Henry can never be to her and her daughter. I was rooting for the two of them to end up together but at the same time for Henry to snap out of it and be a better husband and father. Later in the book you start to get a feeling for why Henry ended up the way he did. I'm not going to spoil the end, but you will find out who ends up together and why. I just wonder how everything is going to work out for everyone afterward. I found myself getting aggravated with most of the characters at one point or another and the ending is not exactly what I had hoped for. Overall it was an enjoyable book, but I kept thinking that many things about it were unrealistic (Charlotte and Henry's long marriage, how Charlotte and Darryl interacted with eachother, and even the amout of dislike shown to her from the townspeople).
 
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peacelily_2006 | 21 outras críticas | Jun 24, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Everyone has favorite types of books---and this is one book that fit perfectly into one of my "types." I loved the layers and inter-weavings of all of the different "loves" Charlotte was working through. I found the book so readable. Page by page kept me wondering how it could/would work out. The descriptions were wonderful and gave me a great mental picture of the entire scene I was reading about.

This is not the author's first novel so I'm pleased that there is more to read from her and that she plans another novel set in Cape Cod.
 
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nyiper | 21 outras críticas | Jun 24, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Personally, I had a hard time getting into this book. I understand why Schmidt chose to make Henry such an unlikeable husband, but after a while it got old. Instead of feeling sorry for Charlotte like I did at the beginning, by the middle her dislike of her husband got on my nerves and I thought she was stupid for staying with him. I also was not rooting for a relationship between her and Darryl.
 
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vindemia | 21 outras críticas | Jun 23, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Charlotte is the main character throughout this book. She is married to Henry, an older man who is consumed by his desire to be a great writer. He treats her with a mixture of contempt and awe and barely acknowledges their 3 year old daughter. Not out of dislike, but not knowing how. When Henry's father dies and they inherit his house on the ocean Charlotte is determined to move out of their small Manhattan apartment to the house on Cape Cod. To be able to afford to live there, she sell part of their land and inadvertantly starts a "war" over who has rights to the beach. She meets an oyster fisherman named Darryl and falls in love with him and he with her. Charlotte obesses over him and would give in to her desires, but Darryl has a sense of right and wrong and denies himself. This book was somewhat interesting, but not a real "page turner".
 
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Beecharmer | 21 outras críticas | Jun 22, 2010 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Probably the most distracting aspect of Schmidt's style of writing was her almost fanatical need to portray Henry as the older, colder, and uncaring husband. I get it. Schmidt wants the reader to cheer Charlotte on when she meets a man more to her liking, more to her temperament, more to her everything. You aren't supposed to hate the damsel in distress. You aren't even allowed to dislike her. In order to make the damsel's potential affair acceptable said damsel's husband needs to be bad. Very bad. If the husband is really awful you wind up begging, praying for that knight in shining armor. In an attempt to make Henry bad I think Schmidt went overboard. As a result Henry became a caricature of the very worst. In the first chapter alone (we're talking 13 pages) there were over 24 negative words associated with Henry.

However...once I got beyond page 14 I loved The House on Oyster Creek. Charlotte can be a little self righteous at times but after putting up with Henry all those years she deserves to be. While House on Oyster Creek focuses on Charlotte as she makes her way the book is really about the entire community she joins. Schmidt is extremely accurate when introducing Charlotte to the new community. when it comes to a tight knit community there will always be this Them and Us attitude.

I will admit this story ended exactly how I wanted it to.½
1 vote
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SeriousGrace | 21 outras críticas | Jun 14, 2010 |
nope, i didn't write this, but I wish i had. This novel of doing the best one can with what one has in a world turned topsy-turvy and crazy insane by parents, professors and without any guide who can be trusted is delicately beautiful.
 
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heidilove | Nov 14, 2007 |
nope, i didn't write these either. in fact, i've never met her. i think i want to keep it that way.½
 
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heidilove | Dec 19, 2005 |