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Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
The concept of this book was interesting. I was drawn into the potential use/impact of AI on a story. However, I thought especially towards the end there were was a lot of different story lines going on and it would have been satisfying as a reader to get some answers or clarity to the book.
 
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LeahMaciel | 25 outras críticas | Jan 2, 2024 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Interesting. Well written. Thought provoking. However I will always prefer human writing.
 
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RobtCM | 25 outras críticas | Dec 20, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This was a really unique book. Right from the beginning I was hooked. Each story was an excellent stand alone event. Quick reads and thought provoking. It was full of surprise twists and turns. As unique as it was, each story brought new happenings. A well done and fun book.
 
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mdkoets | 25 outras críticas | Sep 15, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book is a fun experiment with AI supplying portions of the text, and openly inviting the reader to guess what has been produced by the author, and what has been produced by AI.

Approached in a light-hearted fashion, this is a playful way for us all to reflect on the implications and uses of this new technology, and the way we think about what is 'real'.
 
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PastorBob | 25 outras críticas | Aug 1, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This was quite the read! Definitely will get your brain doing some thinking!
 
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JanaBrooke1987 | 25 outras críticas | Jul 15, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I was really fascinated by the idea, however, I was not aware that this was partially AI-generated itself. That was my mistake. But it's very obvious, and it's cold and distant, and I couldn't connect.
 
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taylorkillpack | 25 outras críticas | Jun 29, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This is a tricky book to review, because I'm both the ideal audience and the worst possible audience for a book that openly uses GPT to co-write the book. It's done in a clever way, trying to break the fourth wall by using AI as a wink to the reader and simultaneously as a plot device. Here's where it's tricky for me, though. I'm a professor of cognitive science who has worked in AI for nearly 30 years. So while I imagine many people love the creative device of using a chatbot in this way, for me it's not new and not productive in the way the author clearly intends it to be. There are already hundreds of books co-written with various iterations of GPT and I've been teaching my students the nuances of the technology for a long time. This means that unlike a naïve reader, I can actually detect some of the writing that isn't by a human author, and it really falls flat for me. So while this book did not hit for me at all, and I much would've preferred just a well-written creative piece of fiction from a human, I also don't want to dissuade others from engaging with the text because it might hit very different for someone not in my unique position.
 
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firepile | 25 outras críticas | Jun 15, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Fascinating! This is the story of Dawson, who suffers a severe brain injury but is saved through the use of an AI implant. What follows is a series of experiences in reality and/or virtual/parallel reality. The reader (along with Dawson) has to try to sort out what is real vs. what is the result of the implant. Very creative and unusual story!
 
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thriftyloco | 25 outras críticas | Jun 5, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I am fascinated by this first attempt in my experience of using an AI program to write a complete novel. The plot was compelling, and the main character was well written. The novel took place entirely from his point of view and he was experiencing difficulty in figuring out his own reality, due to a tragic accident and heroic attempts to restore him to health. The plot device which wove throughout the book was the existence of two completely different reality experiences. All good so far. Unfortunately, the role of editor was completely missing from the book. I realize that this was a review copy and thus not yet finalized, but the random changes in tense and voice were unnerving and annoying. I would love to blame this problem on the AI bot, but I would think that an author would be using the AI bot in a partnership situation and maybe contributing some clarity and style along the way. Perhaps this was the point? The AI is clunky and inept at storytelling? If this was the point, then what was the actual role of the human author?
Beyond these style issues, my only real complaint about the story is the lack of a clear ending. Perhaps I am too literal and don't feel satisfied unless the nature of the reality of the story is spelled out. I never liked Zen koans either, but just when I felt like we were getting somewhere in the plot, the book ended.
1 vote
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mudroom | 25 outras críticas | May 21, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Really interesting concept for a novel. Seeing the recent public interest in machine learning, I was curious how artists might be able to utilize this tool to enhance their work. For a collaboration between human and ML, a book with this premise makes complete sense.

The story itself was rather interesting. The two realities presented throughout the book were compelling as futures that had deeply integrated technology into all aspects of life. I do feel that the way in which the details of this world were presented could have been better. Namely, we often just have a character just describe to Dawson what some technology is, rather than have him learn through experiences, which felt awkward.

There were several things throughout the book that did not make sense in the moment. This included, but was not limited to, details about machine learning (and CS in general) that was off. Much of it ended up being explainable after reading the last chapter, but before that I found it rather frustrating & distracting. However, I imagine that for a reader that does not have a background in machine learning/CS, the oddities with ML would not be an issue.

My biggest complaint about this book is the writing style. ML-generated language is generally clunky, repetitive, & occasionally nonsensical. While this book (supposedly) has both human-written and machine-generated text, I found this problem with language was prevalent throughout. One could argue that the author was trying to match the machine's writing style in an attempt to throw off the reader on which parts were written by which contributor. This doesn't change the fact that it made for a worse reading experience. Yes, getting good language from a ML model is insanely difficult, but perhaps the author could have worked more with whatever model he was using to get better output.

Generally, this is a decent plot & the idea overall is interesting, but the execution did not really work for me. However, I'm coming at this with a decent CS/ML background - a reader with less background might be able to enjoy this more½
1 vote
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brp6kk | 25 outras críticas | May 21, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I am not going to lie, I struggled while reading this. I definitely had the same disorientation as the main character did while reading this, but I also found myself flipping backwards to remind myself of details from each reality. I was also hampered by missing the first 10 pages in the review copy I was sent (via Amazon). I definitely couldn't tell between the AI written and the author written parts.
 
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Nicole_Russell | 25 outras críticas | May 21, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Since reading a few articles about open AI chat bots (one said it wanted to “escape” and had a “plan”), I have become a bit paranoid. Nevertheless, I thought it would be easy to discern the AI-generated chapters in K. R. Simms’s Parallel Realities. But it wasn’t. I started the book as if I were taking a test (ha, a Turing test!), so I wasn’t concerned with any emotional investment.

Simms includes sections wholly written by an AI, “a conversational AI system that listens, learns, and challenges,” or I have to assume he did. The narration is somewhat choppy and clunky throughout, so I wasn’t sure which segments were human-written first drafts or AI-generated. And, unfortunately, I was sometimes distracted by contradictions in the narration.

But aside from the initial challenge, the novel eventually provided my rational examination with many intriguing potentials in AI-human interactions: in government, law, and of course human relations. Trust is important in human relations, and that’s precisely what the main character doesn’t have -- with an AI-implant in his brain to save him from a catastrophic brain injury, he doesn’t know whether his “experiences” with his father and his doctor, among others, are “real” or not.

So for me Parallel Realities is about someone becoming extremely paranoid because he can’t determine real from manufactured experiences, read by a person already somewhat paranoid about AI who can’t determine the human from the manufactured prose.

Great Cover!

I received an early review copy from Librarything. This is an honest review.
 
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khenkins | 25 outras críticas | May 15, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
The idea of this book was intriguing, however, it ended up being disappointing. While I did find it difficult to determine what parts were AI written, it didn't really matter because there were too many distracting grammatical errors. This could still be a decent book, but it still needs some work to make it cohesive.
1 vote
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amilligan | 25 outras críticas | May 15, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This is an interesting exploration of a future world where neural surgery, intended for healing, turns patients into objects for those who wield the power. The hero, Dawson, is recovering from a serious head injury and alternates between rehabilitation exercises with his father and painful 'recalibrations' by his neurosurgeon. His father cares for him as a person; his doctor denies the father exists and seems to treat Dawson as a human guinea pig who must progress according to expectations or face additional torment in the guise of healing. Dawson can’t figure out which world is real and which is fake, and tries to come to terms with that. The author says passages of this book were AI - generated and challenges the reader to find them. Aside from a few grammatical mistakes (run on sentences and errors like using “cue” for “queue”) I couldn’t tell the AI from the human sections. All in all, not a book I usually read - but that’s why I read books!½
 
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ridgeclub | 25 outras críticas | May 10, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I was looking forward to reading this, making the disappointment even worse. I tried setting it aside a couple times hoping for a better future experience -- didn't work. The story focuses on microchips implanted after a traumatic event and the subsequent struggles inside the mind of the protagonist. The author calls this "Turing Fiction" naming it after Alan Turning. The book challenges the reader to determine what has been written by AI and what by the human. Unfortunately, I found myself wondering whether the human "dumbed down" the writing quality to mimic the AI, or neither wrote well enough to hold my attention.½
1 vote
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Powderfinger69 | 25 outras críticas | May 7, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
It is definitely a different book than I am used to reading. But it is still a good book. I recommend to all book readers.
 
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staciew30 | 25 outras críticas | May 2, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Simms's Parallel Realities builds on an interesting concept. With a new brain implant embedded with advanced AI to assist his recovery from a severe brain injury, the main character struggles through multiple concurrent "realities" to sort out what's really going on, along the way touching on many possible implications the growing use of advancing AI could have on human society.

Unfortunately, for me at least, multiple shortcomings of the implementation outweigh the interestingness of these motivating ideas.

The narration throughout felt clumsy and often repetative as might a quick middle-school first draft. Frequent scene contradictions stuck out as sloppy and distracting—a character walks the sidewalk in a new-to-him city alongside a five-story building while describing details about its flat rooftop; a character follows a path around the city perimeter until stopping in the city's center—like cognitive speedbumps along the way, also suggesting the author hasn't really thought out the details of the story.

One could assume that only a generative AI model would make such inconsistency mistakes and thus the clumsier parts must've been among those written by the co-authoring AI, but that seems a weak excuse to me. I've read poorly written books with these same sorts of issues and no AI involvement, and if the AI used isn't ready to produce narration that isn't riddled with these kinds of errors, then it isn't ready to produce this sort of a book.

Meanwhile, various scenes along the way add commentary on possible effects increasing use of advanced AI might have on various elements of life, from policing to courts to fiction and performance art and more, perhaps too many to try to address in one story without feeling forced. Assorted other concepts are also introduced as AI-assisted skills to level-up the main character, such as emotional intelligence and pattern recognition as predictive and manipulative tools, and something along the lines of Zen acceptance. However, all of these elements are hugely simplistic, almost cartoonish characatures of themselves, as though written by someone who's heard of these concepts but doesn't really understand any of them.

The book's description asks if the reader can separate human-written from AI-written. Honestly, I lost interest in the question because it was all equally poorly written.

Finally, the story just ends on a sort of step forward but no real resolution. I suspect it may have been going for an open-but-dismal 1984-like ending, but if so the pieces just don't hold up strongly enough to deliver it.

Overall, I think the author has some interesting ideas to ponder, but for multiple reasons had great difficultly weaving together a coherent story that illustrates them all in any meaningful way. The result just doesn't work for me.

To be fair, the book's copyright page calls it a "beta edition", so perhaps it has some awareness of the need for further iterative training of both authors' learning and generative models?
1 vote
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Thogek | 25 outras críticas | Apr 30, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Well, first, let me say I completely failed at figuring out which parts were written by a human and which ones not. That said, it was an interesting story. I tried to figure out which reality was Dawson's real and which was computer fakery. I failed at that as well. All this failing means the book is a success as far as I'm concerned. I wonder if there'll be a breakdown in the final print edition? I did spot a few spelling/grammatical errors, but couldn't tell if they were the fault of the writing program or us good ol' fallible humans. Well done.
 
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Bargle5 | 25 outras críticas | Apr 27, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book poses a question to the reader - Which parts are written by AI and which are written by a human author? Dawson is in an accident and is given an AI implant to help him recover. But what is reality?

I really enjoyed this book, because it's all about perspective and acceptance. Dawson's "realities" are all he has, and the ending is a downer, but there are other ways of "living." In the end, I didn't care what parts were AI or a human author, but that's just me. The story was good, and I felt for Dawson.
 
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lesindy | 25 outras críticas | Apr 23, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Thought-provoking dual reality prose that never resolves. With regard to AI versus human authorship, there was only one area where I was certain of AI involvement due to the inconsistency created in the story by its described event. Other than that, I was never certain.

The authorship duality was interesting but I can’t imagine that intelligent AI would miss the need for global storyline completion. Its internet research would have shown the commonality of that literary need. Non-storyline resolution is the mark of a human not considering a reader’s need for resolute completion.
 
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ronploude | 25 outras críticas | Apr 22, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
Reality, on a conceptual level and as part of a tangible existence, is explored through two separate/divergent experiences. The protagonist jumps from one experience to another without being able to control or fully make sense of it. I found the story compelling as it winds forward and back, filling in pieces of the character's life, but moving us through the protagonist's AI-augmented recovery process.

The author invites the reader to determine which parts of the story are AI-generated as we progress, adding another layer of suspense to the storyline. I enjoyed the characters (with some reservations) and the speculation on which part may be AI-generated vs. written by the author; I am interested in finding out what's happens next. As AI tools appear to become more integrated into our lives, we'll need to examine their impact on our lives. How we can hold on to our human essence, what we're willing to cede to the AI algorithms and how to stave off or remediate the dire detrimental consequences for humanity.
 
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NilouF | 25 outras críticas | Apr 22, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book is billed as a psycho-mystery that explores the possibility of AI implants rewriting some of the human experience.

The protagonist, Dawson, undergoes a major brain injury. The only way to help him have any kind of meaningful life is to implant an ai-on-a-chip in his brain to help him.

The book takes us through is journey from his perspective as the AI seems to modify his perception of reality, giving him experiences of multiple realities with no control of his shifting between them.

Another aspect of this book is that an AI wrote sections of it. I’ve been playing with several ai available on the web, it is clearly beyond what I have access to, yet I think this task is a bit premature. I found it’s writing poor, it almost always uses the present tense where, although it seems grammatically correct, it feels unnatural and uncolloquial. It is overly repetitive and doesn’t grasp human nature. For instance, on female character repeatedly covers her mouth every time she laughs or blushes, several times in a few pages. I can’t speak to the author, whom I haven’t read nor heard of before, who may have been writing down to the level of the AI to make the book more homogenous. In any case, it could have done with a good editor.

I did find the story itself interesting enough to work through the book. It is a fairly easy and quick read, but not one I’d recommend.
1 vote
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Nodosaurus | 25 outras críticas | Apr 20, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
A human suffers a traumatic brain injury and has microchips implanted in his brain to help him recover. What ensues is a tale of two different realities. In one reality he is on the road to recovery with a loving father shepherding him through rehabilitation. In another reality he is held captive in a lab and subjected to repeated, torturous procedures. He cannot determine which reality is true and which is a figment of his imagination. He cannot control how he moves between the two realities. The twist to this book is that the author says he wrote it in collaboration with an artificial intelligence and challenges the reader to determine who/what wrote each section. The story was not compelling to me. The protagonist is in a confused muddle for much of the time. When he is able to get out of the lab he doesn't make sensible choices. When is in rehab with his father, he is left to wander a city alone, even though he is still recovering from his situation.. And yet, even brain-injured, visibly confused and not able to understand the world he is in, he is able to meet a beautiful woman, who finds him, inexplicably, irresistible, and then have sex with her within a couple of days. I just find this sexist bias a bit much in 2023. I received an advance copy but the numerous typos, poor grammar and weird phrases were a distraction. Maybe the AI wrote those sections?
1 vote
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Course8 | 25 outras críticas | Apr 14, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
I received this book as part of LibraryThing’s early reviewer program.

I started this book and put it couldn't read past page 5. I flipped through the book and it didn't get better. I am not impressed by GPT-3
 
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amuskopf | 25 outras críticas | Apr 12, 2023 |
Esta crítica foi escrita no âmbito dos Primeiros Críticos do LibraryThing.
This book has been received as an early review. It immediately comes off mysterious and a tad unnerving. It was a pleasure to read this story. Not only is the actual content engaging but the concept pushes us as readers into a place we know is there but have not quite stepped into yet. I thoroughly enjoyed the story in itself as a whole. Mental illness, trauma, technology. It really reminded me of The Terminal Man by Michael Crichton. I still don't know if I want all my material spoon-fed through a machine though. I would gladly read another installment, simply because I liked the characters and think they had room to grow. I think some of the readers have forgotten that this book appears to be somewhat of an experiment. I read advances copies of novels on a regular basis and it is understood that what I am reading may or may not be a final copy before mass publication. But I am also aware that 95 percent of the advance copies available never see a commercial seller or will be seen in hardcopy in a regular book store. The whole purpose of advance reading is for feedback. And all feedback is supposed to be constructive. Sometimes you have to hurt a writer's feelings. If they are a true artist they will take it with a grain of salt. In the case of this book, the writer may be able to shelter themselves or put a protective wall up between the handwritten material and the AI generated segments.
 
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JHemlock | 25 outras críticas | Apr 12, 2023 |
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