Picture of author.

Johanna Skibsrud

Autor(a) de The Sentimentalists

13+ Works 650 Membros 47 Críticas

About the Author

Image credit: PRISM international

Obras por Johanna Skibsrud

Associated Works

xo Orpheus: Fifty New Myths (2013) — Contribuidor — 277 exemplares
Granta 141: Canada (2017) — Contribuidor — 58 exemplares
Ice floe II international poetry of the far north (2000) — Contribuidor — 3 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Membros

Críticas

I am not enjoying this, but am determined to finish the darn thing. On top of its obtuse boringness, it has glaring grammar errors that are not being used as dialect or anything. Poor writing, editing, proofreading? Wallows in words without getting anywhere....
Now finished, and very little further ahead. Clarity is not what this author was going for, apparently.
 
Assinalado
Abcdarian | 37 outras críticas | May 18, 2024 |
I don't get the attention to this book. It is depressing depressing depressing, and there is no relief throughout. Everyone walks about not saying anything to anyone. In one of my "favorite" passages (well, it did make me snort with laugher), the narrator's sister stands up and says nothing to the narrator and the father, then walks to the door, pauses, and says nothing again. It's enough to make me want to scream, simply for some noise in the narrative.
It all seems just a wee bit too precious for me, and reeks of the "can lit" that school kids mock. Do we HAVE to write depressing stories about nothing?
The "inciting incident" is not really described and throughout the book, because no one ever talks and merely sit around looking at nothing or each other or the night or whatever, we spend a great deal of time wondering what the heck is going on and who all these people are.
That said, some of the language is beautiful, but I feel the book is uneven, confusing, and rather dreadful. I had the e-edition, and there were typos throughout as well.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Dabble58 | 37 outras críticas | Nov 11, 2023 |
I won't lie, this book was hard to read. I was super excited to read another anthology/short story book, but this one let me down!!

Each story was unique in it's idea - I thought each would have made a great novel all on their own, with the little short story being a "pilot run" for the idea. But when you read these little short stories on their own, it seems like endless rambling and pointless stories. I really wish Johanna would have expanded on each story and fully fleshed them out, because they were unique and impressive on their own.

With such incredible concepts, it's really sad to see the wasted potential. I do think this book is worth the read, because you can see the obvious talent Johanna Skibsrud.

Overall, it's a beautifully written set of short stories but comes up short for me.

Two out of five stars.

I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Briars_Reviews | 1 outra crítica | Aug 4, 2023 |
I've kept this book around for over 10 years based mainly on the fact that it won the Giller Prize. That was in 2010 and one of the other contenders for the prize was Annabel by Kathleen Winter. I read Annabel shortly after it was published and I thought it was an amazing book. I certainly can't say I felt that way about this book. Obviously the prize jury saw something in it that I didn't.

Napoleon Haskell is reaching the end of his life, a life which hasn't been easy or rewarding. Like many other young American men in the 1960s he fought in the Vietnam War and like many of those who returned from that war he is haunted by it. He abandoned his wife and two young daughters and wandered from place to place in the US, drinking and smoking too much. One of the few accomplishments in his life was finding Henry, the father of his war buddy, Owen, who was killed in Vietnam. The question of why Owen, a Canadian, enlisted in the US Marines is never really answered and Napoleon seems to not have known he was Canadian because it took him years to find Henry. When he did he took his family to stay with Henry in his "government house" on the edge of a lake created when the St. Lawrence Seaway was built. So, when his daughters, Helen and the unnamed narrator, decide he needs more care it seems logical to move him from Fargo, ND to Henry's place in Ontario. Henry is in a wheelchair and has a part-time nurse who can also keep an eye on Napoleon. At least that was the plan. Then when the narrator's relationship in New York City crashes and she goes to Henry's place too it gives an opportunity for the daughter to learn more about her father. Napoleon tells her stories that somewhat clarify his history including an incident in Vietnam in which US troops killed the people in a small village. Even so, Napoleon's story doesn't clarify what happened to Owen. That's just one of the loose ends in this book which I found frustrating.

I'm sure the author's emphasis on the drowned town where Henry was raised which could sometimes be seen from the surface of the lake has some literary meaning but I'm damned if I know what it is. I also found that I occasionally had to reread sentences in order to understand what the author meant. And sometimes it still wasn't clear to me. Perhaps an English scholar would have a better understanding of this book; I've never claimed to be a scholar.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
gypsysmom | 37 outras críticas | Jun 7, 2023 |

Listas

Prémios

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Estatísticas

Obras
13
Also by
3
Membros
650
Popularidade
#38,841
Avaliação
2.9
Críticas
47
ISBN
63
Línguas
1

Tabelas & Gráficos