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Luis Alberto Urrea

Autor(a) de The Hummingbird's Daughter

24+ Works 5,739 Membros 275 Críticas 15 Favorited

About the Author

Luis Alberto Urrea is the author of many books of nonfiction and poetry. He has won the Christopher Award, the Western States Book Award, and most recently, the American Book Award.
Image credit: luisurrea.com

Séries

Obras por Luis Alberto Urrea

Associated Works

The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Sixteenth Annual Collection (2003) — Contribuidor — 234 exemplares
The Best American Mystery Stories 2011 (2011) — Contribuidor — 188 exemplares
The Best American Poetry 1996 (1996) — Contribuidor — 169 exemplares
Phoenix Noir (2009) — Contribuidor — 136 exemplares
Edges (1980) — Contribuidor — 102 exemplares
Fourteen Days: A Collaborative Novel (2022) — Contribuidor — 96 exemplares
USA Noir: Best of the Akashic Noir Series (2013) — Contribuidor — 83 exemplares
Anonymous Sex (2022) — Contribuidor — 60 exemplares
The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature (2010) — Contribuidor — 58 exemplares
Alone Together: Love, Grief, and Comfort in the Time of COVID-19 (2020) — Contribuidor — 57 exemplares
Lone Star Noir (2010) — Contribuidor — 54 exemplares
Muy Macho (1996) — Contribuidor — 46 exemplares
San Diego Noir (2011) — Contribuidor — 45 exemplares
Mirrors Beneath the Earth: Short Fiction by Chicano Writers (1995) — Contribuidor — 17 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Data de nascimento
1955-08-20
Sexo
male
Nacionalidade
USA
Local de nascimento
Tijuana, Mexico
Locais de residência
Tijuana, Mexico
San Diego, California, USA
Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Boulder, Colorado, USA
Tucson, Arizona, USA
Lafayette, Louisiana, USA (mostrar todos 7)
Naperville, Illinois, USA
Educação
University of California, San Diego
University of Colorado
Ocupações
author
professor
Prémios e menções honrosas
Western States Book Award (Poetry ∙ 1996)
Latino Literature Hall of Fame (2000)
Lannan Literary Award (Nonfiction ∙ 2004)
Pulitzer Prize Finalist (2005)
Kiriyama Prize (2006)
American Book Award (1999)
Agente
Sandra Dijkstra Literary Agency
Michael Cendejas (Lynn Pleshette Agency ∙ Lynn Pleshette Agency)
Trinity Ray (American Program Bureau ∙ American Program Bureau)
Julie Barer (Barer Literary ∙ LLC)

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Luis Alberto Urrea (born August 20, 1955 in Tijuana, Mexico) is a Mexican American poet, novelist, and essayist.

Luis Urrea is the son of Alberto Urrea Murray, of Rosario, Sinaloa, Mexico and Phyllis Dashiell, born in Staten Island, New York. He was born on August 20, 1955 in Tijuana, Mexico, and listed as an American born abroad. Both his parents worked in San Diego. In 1958 the family moved to Logan Heights in South San Diego, because he had tuberculosis and they felt he would recover in the US. The family moved again in 1965 to Clairemont, a newer subdivision in the city of San Diego. His mother encouraged him to write and encouraged him to attend college and to apply for grants that would help pay for his college education. He attended the University of California, San Diego, earning an undergraduate degree in writing in 1977. Urrea completed his graduate studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His father died by murder on a trip to his home village in 1977, seeking money there to spend on his son's college education. This motivated Urrea to write an essay that was published in 1980, as way of processing his grief.

After serving as a relief worker in Tijuana, he worked as a teachers aid in the Chicano Studies department in San Diego's Mesa College in 1978. He also worked as a film extra and columnist-editor-cartoonist for several publications. In June 1982 Urrea moved to Boston where he taught expository writing and fiction workshops at Harvard University. He has also taught at Massachusetts Bay Community College, and the University of Colorado, and he was the writer in residence at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Urrea married in 1987, and later divorced in 1993. In 1994, Urrea's first novel, In Search of Snow, was published. His mother died in 1990, bringing Urrea back to California to settle her affairs, and parts of Across the Wire were published in the San Diego Reader.

Urrea lives with his family in Naperville, Illinois, where he is a professor of creative writing at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

In two heavily researched historical novels, The Hummingbird's Daughter and Queen of America, Urrea tells the story of his father's aunt, Teresita Urrea, who was known as "The Saint of Cabora" and "The Mexican Joan of Arc."

Membros

Discussions

November 2022: Luis Alberto Urrea em Monthly Author Reads (Novembro 2022)

Críticas

The Red Cross supported the troops not just with nurses but Donut Dollies, young women who followed the rear battle lines with coffee, fresh donuts and cheer served from their truck. This is the semi biographical story of the author’s mother of a poorly documented piece of WWII. Dorothy and Irene who are put together on a truck and travel behind the soldiers in the Battle of the Bulge and enter Germany. They become close friends, enjoy escapades together and have some romance on R and R. Charming story of friendship, great ending and well read.… (mais)
 
Assinalado
bblum | 17 outras críticas | Feb 26, 2024 |
Kirkus: Two women witness the horrors of World War II via a snack truck.Pulitzer Prize and NBCC Award finalist Urrea?s remarkable, elegantly written novel focuses on the Red Cross? little-known Clubmobile Corps, which during World War II was charged with bringing coffee, doughnuts, and good company to weary GIs. The women had no medical training and were often condescended to as ?Donut Dollies,? but because they were stationed in the heart of battle, they played no small part in improving morale and required a steely resolve of their own. Irene Woodward, who?s escaped New York and an abusive fiance, and Dorothy Dunford, who?s left her family and failing farm in Indiana, are paired together in a massive truck that, across the novel, heads from England to France and Germany in 1944 and 1945. En route, they witness some of the worst the post?D-Day European theater has to offer, from bombs to snipers to death camps; during lulls, the two fend off their share of harassment as well. (It?s all a recipe for PTSD and overwhelming for many; the Clubmobile was designed to be operated by three women, but so many drop out there?s a running gag about an unnamed ?Third Girl in the Truck.?) Irene, artsy and romantic, has an opposites-attract rapport with the no-nonsense Dorothy, which Urrea plays for both humor and pathos, but he stresses how unified they are in absorbing the constant surprises and tragedies of warfare; a sunny retreat to Cannes is followed by a trek to Buchenwald. This material is personal for Urrea, whose mother served in the Clubmobile Corps, and a few sentimental notes slip into the story. But there?s plenty of grit, detail, and twists that make for both a fine page-turner and an evocation of war?s often cruel randomness.Top-shelf historical fiction delivered with wit and compassion.… (mais)
 
Assinalado
bentstoker | 17 outras críticas | Jan 26, 2024 |
(2023)Really, really good book. Two women are thrown together to take the ARC Rapid City Clubmobile to Europe to serve coffee and doughnuts to the troops during WWII.They become fast and at times feuding friends as they travel in their GMC conversion from London to D-Day, across France and into Germany. When trying to get Dorothy and a baby she rescued from the death camps out of Germany at the end of the war, Irene crashes the truck off the side of a hill. Both women think the other has been killed as they live haunted lives until reunited in the end.

KIRKUS: Two women witness the horrors of World War II via a snack truck. Pulitzer Prize and NBCC Award finalist Urrea?s remarkable, elegantly written novel focuses on the Red Cross? little-known Clubmobile Corps, which during World War II was charged with bringing coffee, doughnuts, and good company to weary GIs. The women had no medical training and were often condescended to as ?Donut Dollies,? but because they were stationed in the heart of battle, they played no small part in improving morale and required a steely resolve of their own. Irene Woodward, who?s escaped New York and an abusive fiance, and Dorothy Dunford, who?s left her family and failing farm in Indiana, are paired together in a massive truck that, across the novel, heads from England to France and Germany in 1944 and 1945. En route, they witness some of the worst the post?D-Day European theater has to offer, from bombs to snipers to death camps; during lulls, the two fend off their share of harassment as well. (It?s all a recipe for PTSD and overwhelming for many; the Clubmobile was designed to be operated by three women, but so many drop out there?s a running gag about an unnamed ?Third Girl in the Truck.?) Irene, artsy and romantic, has an opposites-attract rapport with the no-nonsense Dorothy, which Urrea plays for both humor and pathos, but he stresses how unified they are in absorbing the constant surprises and tragedies of warfare; a sunny retreat to Cannes is followed by a trek to Buchenwald. This material is personal for Urrea, whose mother served in the Clubmobile Corps, and a few sentimental notes slip into the story. But there?s plenty of grit, detail, and twists that make for both a fine page-turner and an evocation of war?s often cruel randomness.

Top-shelf historical fiction delivered with wit and compassion.
Pub Date: May 30, 2023

ISBN: 9780316265850

Page Count: 416

Publisher: Little, Brown
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
derailer | 17 outras críticas | Jan 25, 2024 |
While I enjoyed Urrea's soaring prose, humour, and characters, I found the story wanting in direction. I found myself wanting him to abandon the historical altogether.
 
Assinalado
MylesKesten | 11 outras críticas | Jan 23, 2024 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
24
Also by
21
Membros
5,739
Popularidade
#4,297
Avaliação
4.0
Críticas
275
ISBN
101
Línguas
3
Marcado como favorito
15

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