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Valerie WildingCríticas

Autor(a) de Bloody Tower

29 Works 805 Membros 15 Críticas

Críticas

Mostrando 15 de 15
Dit is onze wereld. Vier feest met ons. Tekst: Valerie Wilding. Illustraties: Åsa Gilland.

Ik hou van kleurrijke prentenboeken, helemaal als ik er nog iets uit bijleer. Uit Vier feest met ons heb ik veel geleerd, én ik werd verliefd op de kleurrijke, vrolijke prenten.

In dit boek maak je kennis met 20 feestdagen van over heel de wereld. Sommigen vieren wij hier ook (soms op een ander moment), anderen kennen wij totaal niet. Denk maar aan Kerst (op 7 januari in Oekraïne), Dia de los Muertos (Mexico) of het Midherfstfestival (China).

Je leert wat er gevierd wordt en waarom, welke lekkernijen er gegeten worden, wat de mensen aandoen, welke rituelen er aan verbonden zijn,… Heel boeiend.

Een feestelijke reis rond de wereld op papier; geweldig. Een boek dat jong en oud aanspreekt en in geen enkele klas mag ontbreken!
 
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Els04 | Oct 3, 2023 |
Summary:

This book is an informational book about different princesses around the world and throughout history. The book goes over the typical things like what princesses wear and how they became princesses. It also has section about a princess education and their duties.

Review:

This book had many good things. There were many textural features. Like pictures and explanations. Little short riddles and questions to keep the children engaged. The way the author writes in an entertaining way. I also thought the book did a good job integrating diversity in the book. There a group of diverse princesses. from china to Africa.
 
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ycinto1 | Oct 28, 2014 |
this book is kind of scary because it tells you how people died in the past and that bloody mary died in the 15 or 19
 
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bestfriends3 | 6 outras críticas | Nov 29, 2013 |
THE BEST BOOK EVER DO NOT GET BEHEADED OR CLOSE
 
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fluffypeach | 6 outras críticas | Nov 25, 2013 |
The title goes with the story line i was 3 or 4 pages in and i was hooked on to the book it was sad when the book ended
 
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Shawty1337 | 6 outras críticas | Oct 23, 2013 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | Jan 22, 2013 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | 1 outra crítica | Jan 22, 2013 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | Sep 5, 2012 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | Sep 5, 2012 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | Sep 5, 2012 |
This entire series is a wonderful way to learn history or teach it to adolescents. I find today's generations seem to recall more when they learn through other people (pop songs, celebrity gossip, etc.), so what better way to teach history than through someone else's perspective? Yes, "authentic" diaries would be "better", but would the language really hold the modern student's attention? Did the diary writer know what WOULD be important in the context of history? Probably not.
 
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benuathanasia | 6 outras críticas | Sep 5, 2012 |
Eleven-year-old Mary Wade is the oldest of seven children in a poor family living in London in 1789. Her father is usually away working, leaving her mother to care for the children alone. There is never enough money, and they are often cold and hungry. One day, hoping to help her mother, Mary makes a terrible decision that will change her life forever. With the help of her friend, Mary steals some clothing to sell. The next day, she is caught and arrested. At trial, she is convicted and sentenced to death, all for stealing a few pieces of clothing.

Mary spends the next few months in filthy Newgate Prison, wondering what will happen to her. She misses her family and is terrified she won't live to grow up and try to have a better life and have children of her own. Then her sentence is commuted to transportation to the new colony of New South Wales (present day Sydney, Australia). Mary is grateful for a chance to survive but sad she will never see England or her family again. The sea voyage is very long and Mary wonders what will await her at the end.

No Way Back is a bit different from the other books in the My Story series, since it is based on the life of a real person, unlike the other books, which describe real historical events from the point of view of a fictional main character. Mary Wade was one of the youngest convicts to be transported to Australia. She survived and thrived and grew up to have so many children that she now has thousands of descendents living today. It is also not an actual diary like the other books in the series (since Mary would not have had a diary to write in) but is written in the style of one. I enjoyed this book but I wish it had been a bit longer and more detailed. It ends with Mary's arrival in New South Wales and I would have liked to read about her life there. I think readers who enjoyed other books in the My Story series (or other similar series such as Dear America and Dear Canada) would enjoy this book as well.
 
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rebecca191 | 1 outra crítica | Feb 17, 2012 |
These are the diary entries of Tilly between the ages of 12 and 18. Tilly is the daughter of the Tower of London’s physician, and it is set in the years starting with the short reign of Lady Jane Grey and ending with Elizabeth I’s ascent to the throne. During these years Tilly watches the waves of change in English politics that flow around the Tower, and witnesses many executions. There are some nice details of daily life in 16th century London that the author slips in unobtrusively.

This book doesn’t spare any gory details, and some of them may be disturbing to especially sensitive readers, but it IS a children’s book, so it’s pre-teen level head chopping ;-) This is part of the My Story series, which also includes books about the 17th century plague, the Irish famine and the London Blitz. This is also a good gateway book to start any young reader’s Tudor addiction. Bloody Tower at ten, Wolf Hall at 18.½
1 vote
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Nickelini | 6 outras críticas | Apr 26, 2010 |
This is a great book which gives great insight into the events surrounding Edward VI's succession. The story is written in Diary format and shows how events may have looked from the point of view of a girl growing up in the Tower of London. The story is followed by a timeline of events then copies of historivcal documents. A great way to get kids interested in History.
 
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seldombites | 6 outras críticas | Aug 1, 2009 |
This book is one in the My Story series. The books in this series are fictional diaries of young girls living during different periods of British, Scottish, and Irish history.

Tilly Middleton is thirteen years old in the spring of 1553, when she begins her diary. She and her family live at the Tower of London, where her father is the physician. She describes her life at home, doing chores and helping care for her younger siblings, as well as the events of the day in England. It is a time of great turmoil, as the young king, Edward, dies, and his Catholic half-sister, Mary, becomes Queen of England. During Mary's reign, many people are kept at the tower as prisoners, including Mary's Protestant half-sister, Elizabeth.

I enjoyed this book from the My Story series a lot, as I particularly like this time period, but the book covered a long time period, and as a result, the later half contained a lot less detail than I would have liked, so I wish it were longer. However, I still recommend it to readers who enjoy historical fiction in diary format or who have an interest in this time period.½
 
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rebecca191 | 6 outras críticas | Nov 11, 2008 |
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