Picture of author.

Edmund Wilson (1895–1972)

Autor(a) de To the Finland Station

93+ Works 8,057 Membros 76 Críticas 17 Favorited

About the Author

Wilson roamed the world and read widely in many languages. He was a journalist for leading literary periodicals: Vanity Fair, where he was briefly managing editor; The New Republic, where he was associate editor for five years; and the New Yorker, where he was book reviewer in the 1940s. These mostrar mais varied experiences were typical of Wilson's range of interests and ability. Eternally productive and endlessly readable, he conquered American literature in countless essays. If he is idiosyncratic and lacks a rigid mold, that probably contributes to his success as a literary critic, since he was not committed to interpretation in the straitjacket of some popular approach or dogma. His critical position suits his cosmopolitan background---historical and sociological considerations prevail. He went through a brief Marxist period and experimented with Freudian criticism. Axel's Castle (1931), a penetrating analysis of the symbolist writer, has exerted a great influence on contemporary literary criticism. Its dedication, to Christian Gauss of Princeton, reads:"It was principally from you that I acquired.. .my idea of what literary criticism ought to be---a history of man's ideas and imaginings in the setting of the conditions which have shaped them."His volume of satiric short stories, Memoirs of Hecate County (1946), with its frankly erotic passages, was the subject of court cases in a less tolerant decade than the present one. It was Wilson's own favorite among his writings, but he complained that those individuals who like his other work tend to disregard it. (Bowker Author Biography) mostrar menos
Image credit: Courtesy of the NYPL Digital Gallery (image use requires permission from the New York Public Library)

Séries

Obras por Edmund Wilson

To the Finland Station (1940) 1,318 exemplares
The Crack-Up (1945) — Editor — 917 exemplares
Memoirs of Hecate County (1946) 558 exemplares
The scrolls from the Dead Sea (1955) 470 exemplares
The American Earthquake (1958) 140 exemplares
Apologies to the Iroquois (1959) 131 exemplares
I Thought of Daisy (1929) 113 exemplares
The Triple Thinkers (1938) 91 exemplares
Israel and the Dead Sea Scrolls (2000) 81 exemplares
The Portable Edmund Wilson (1983) 80 exemplares
Europe Without Baedeker (1966) 76 exemplares
A Literary Chronicle: 1920-1950 (1952) 46 exemplares
The Devils And Canon Barham (1973) 34 exemplares
Eight essays (1954) 32 exemplares
Red, Black, Blond and Olive (1956) 27 exemplares
Night Thoughts (1961) 26 exemplares
The Higher Jazz (1998) 24 exemplares
Galahad and I Thought of Daisy (1963) 20 exemplares
The Intent of the Critic (1941) — Contribuidor; Contribuidor — 15 exemplares
From Uncollected Edmund Wilson (1995) 15 exemplares
Edmund Wilson, Man In Letters (2001) 13 exemplares
Five Plays (1954) 12 exemplares
The fruits of the MLA (1963) 9 exemplares
The Collected Essays of John Peale Bishop (1948) — Introdução; Editor — 8 exemplares
The Undertaker's Garland (1922) 6 exemplares
The Rats of Rutland Grange. (1974) 5 exemplares
Note Books of Night (1942) 5 exemplares
Galahad (1971) 4 exemplares
Poets, Farewell! 3 exemplares
The surprise of excellence: modern essays on Max Beerbohm (1974) — Contribuidor — 3 exemplares
A Book of Princeton Verse, Volume I — Contribuidor — 2 exemplares
Who Killed Carlo Tresca? (1983) 2 exemplares
Obra selecta (2008) 2 exemplares
Dead Sea Scrolls 1947 1969 (1969) 1 exemplar
Ivan Turgheniev (1960) 1 exemplar
Szkice 1 exemplar

Associated Works

The Last Tycoon (1941) — Prefácio, algumas edições; Editor, algumas edições; Prefácio, algumas edições2,594 exemplares
The Waste Land (Norton Critical Editions) (2000) — Contribuidor — 1,536 exemplares
50 Great Short Stories (1952) — Contribuidor — 1,258 exemplares
The Best American Essays of the Century (2000) — Contribuidor — 780 exemplares
Brief Lives (1898) — Prefácio, algumas edições697 exemplares
Nightmare Abbey (1818) — Prefácio, algumas edições434 exemplares
Critical Theory Since Plato (1971) — Contribuidor, algumas edições400 exemplares
The QPB Companion to The Lord of the Rings (2001) — Contribuidor — 363 exemplares
Writing New York: A Literary Anthology (1998) — Contribuidor — 281 exemplares
The 40s: The Story of a Decade (2014) — Contribuidor — 277 exemplares
Peasants and Other Stories (1956) — Editor — 224 exemplares
Reader in Comparative Religion: An Anthropological Approach (1958) — Contribuidor — 209 exemplares
The Norton Book of Personal Essays (1997) — Contribuidor — 142 exemplares
A Comprehensive Anthology of American Poetry (1929) — Contribuidor — 129 exemplares
The Great Gatsby / Tender Is The Night / The Last Tycoon (1953) — Editor, algumas edições107 exemplares
Twentieth-Century American Poetry (1777) — Contribuidor — 98 exemplares
A Reader's Companion to the Hobbit and the Lord of the Rings (1995) — Contribuidor — 77 exemplares
The Complete Works of Kate Chopin (Southern Literary Studies) (1969) — Prefácio, algumas edições; Prefácio — 36 exemplares
H.P. LOVECRAFT: Four Decades of Criticism (1980) — Contribuidor — 34 exemplares
James Joyce: Two Decades of Criticism (1946) — Contribuidor — 22 exemplares
A. E. Housman: A Collection of Critical Essays (1968) — Contribuidor — 22 exemplares
J. R. R. Tolkien, der Mythenschöpfer (1984) — Autor — 7 exemplares
Eighteen Stories (1965) 4 exemplares
The Ethnic Image in Modern American Literature, 1900-1950 (1984) — Contribuidor — 1 exemplar
The Dial, Vol LXXVII No 3, September 1924 — Contribuidor, algumas edições1 exemplar

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Nome canónico
Wilson, Edmund
Nome legal
Wilson, Edmund, Jr.
Outros nomes
Bunny
Data de nascimento
1895-05-08
Data de falecimento
1972-06-12
Localização do túmulo
Wellfleet, Massachusetts, USA
Sexo
male
Nacionalidade
USA
Local de nascimento
Red Bank, New Jersey, USA
Local de falecimento
Talcottville, New York, USA
Locais de residência
Red Bank, New Jersey, USA
Talcottville, New York, USA
Wellfleet, Massachusetts, USA
Educação
Princeton University (BA|2016)
The Hill School, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, USA
Ocupações
managing editor (Vanity Fair)
newspaper reporter
associate editor (The New Republic)
book reviewer
literary critic
historian (mostrar todos 8)
translator
memoirist
Relações
McCarthy, Mary (wife)
Nabokov, Vladimir (friend)
Fitzgerald, F. Scott (friend)
Bishop, John Peale (friend)
Zabel, Morton Dauwen (friend)
Organizações
The Sun (New York)
Vanity Fair
The New Republic
The New Yorker
The New York Review of Books
Prémios e menções honrosas
Presidential Medal of Freedom (1963)
Emerson-Thoreau Medal (1966)
National Book Award (1953, 1956, 1963)
Edward MacDowell Medal (1964)

Fatal error: Call to undefined function isLitsy() in /var/www/html/inc_magicDB.php on line 425
Edmund Wilson was born in Red Bank, New Jersey. He attended The Hill School, a private boarding school in Pennsylvania, where he served as the editor-in-chief of the school's literary magazine, then went on to Princeton University, where he was a classmate of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Their friendship became one of the most important literary relationships in the history of American letters. Wilson read omnivorously across the spectrum of modern European and Russian writers, including Proust, Joyce, Eliot, Valéry, Dostoyevsky, Gogol, and Pushkin, along with almost all the 20th century American writers. He began his writing career as a reporter for the New York Sun, and became the managing editor of Vanity Fair in 1920. He later served as associate editor of The New Republic and as a book reviewer for The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books. He wrote plays, poems, and novels, but his greatest influence was as a literary critic, essayist, and historian. These books included Axel's Castle: A Study in the Imaginative Literature of 1870–1930 (1931) a sweeping survey of Symbolism. To the Finland Station (1940) was a broad study of European socialism up to the Bolsheviks Revolution. Wilson's work was heavily influenced by the ideas of Sigmund Freud and Karl Marx, and in turn, his work influenced novelists such as Upton Sinclair, John Dos Passos, Sinclair Lewis, and Theodore Dreiser. Wilson was married four times, most famously to Mary McCarthy, who was 17 years his junior, from 1938 to 1946.

Wilson edited the posthumous papers and notebooks of his college friend F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Crack-Up (1945), and also edited the novel The Last Tycoon (1941), which Fitzgerald had left uncompleted at his death.

Membros

Críticas

Notes from Edmund Wilson always make interesting reading. Admitting his own lack of familiarity with Canadian culture, he is nonetheless informative when it comes to a personal view of politics and literature in Eastern Canada, especially with regard to the French/English divide, so much in focus in the sixties.
He firstly presents a fulsome critique of Morely Callaghan, novelist, ranking him among the greats. This caused some consternation at the time, but having read Callaghan, I rate him highly too. (He's also famous for putting Ernest Hemingway away in a boxing match between the writers in Twenties Paris).
Wilson takes time to review some of the French Canadian writers who, at that time were confined to catering to their own culture solely.
The dominance of the Catholic Church in Quebec culture and politics is another theme. In Wilson's treatment, the Church was the only established repository of French culture functioning until the struggle for adequate recognition in the whole country began in the sixties. This in the face of disdain and disregard from the English majority.
Worth reading at a remove of sixty years as much has happened in Canada since. Regardless, it is worth taking note of the contemporaneous situation there, seen through the eyes of an astute and singular critic of Twentieth Century writing and art.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
ivanfranko | May 2, 2024 |
The Scrolls from the Dead Sea and The Dead Sea Scrolls 1947-1969
By Edmund Wilson

This is a review of Edmund Wilson’s original book about the Dead Sea Scrolls, published in 1955, and his updated and expanded book, published in 1969. Much like Elaine Pagels’ books about the Gnostic Gospels, Wilson’s books are about the history and interpretation of the Dead Sea scrolls, rather than a translation of the original texts. Wilson’s books, more than Pagels’, are full of high adventure and intrigue, especially because they take place in Palestine, a land notorious for religious and political upheaval, and because of the time in which they take place, from 1947, at the end of the British mandate, to 1969, two years after the Six-Day War between the Arabs and the Israelis. The Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered by a Bedouin boy in a cave along the western shore of the Dead Sea in 1947, two years after the discovery of the Nag Hammadi scrolls (gnostic gospels) in Egypt. Unlike the Nag Hammadi texts, which are Christian (written in Coptic), the Dead Sea Scrolls are Jewish (written in Hebrew). They are of interest, however, to both Jewish and Christian biblical scholars, although for different reasons.

Wilson explains why the discovery of the scrolls was problematic and upsetting for scholars and why it took some time for them to be accepted as authentic. He reminds us that up until about 400 BCE, the Israeli religion was practiced and handed down through oral tradition. Our earliest written Judeo-Christian scriptures are:

- [ ] The Alexandrian Septuagint (a Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible that dates from the third century BCE)
- [ ] St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate (a Latin translation of the Christian Bible that dates from the late fourth century CE)
- [ ] The Masoretic texts (a translation of the Hebrew Bible that dates from the ninth century CE)

It’s important to remember that almost all knowledge of the Bible, up until the 1947 discovery had come from a small set of texts that span from a period of about 1,300 years - 400 years before Christ with the Septuagint to 900 years after him with the Masoretic texts. As Wilson says, “It took some courage to face new materials where none had been imagined to exist.”

Wilson, one of America’s greatest literary critics, is a brilliant writer. He masterfully weaves a story that combines political intrigue, place-setting in a dry, dusty land where if only the fighting would stop so that archaeologists (several of whom are also clergy) can get on with it, and scholarly bickering and possessiveness of not only the scrolls but of their interpretation as well. His theory, or not so much his but the general consensus of what he believes are the more objective scholars, is that the Essenes, a Jewish communal society who lived from the second century BCE to the first CE, may have been the precedent for Christianity. At the start of his book, Wilson somewhat dryly describes the archaeology of the Essene monastery - the “cave” where the Bedouin boy unknowingly discovered the sect’s library. Much later, after he’s woven his fascinating tale, he connects the archaeological, religious, and historical dots with a beautiful sentence: “The monastery, this structure of stone that endures, between the bitter waters and precipitous cliffs, with its oven and its inkwells, its mill and its cesspool, its constellation of sacred fonts and the unadorned graves of its dead, is perhaps, more than Bethlehem or Nazareth, the cradle of Christianity.“

I enjoyed the original of Wilson’s book more than I did the expanded version. The original story was more compelling, and while the expanded version was certainly interesting, it didn’t capture the imagination quite so effectively. Additionally, Wilson weakened the aura of his story with an offputting appendix in the expanded version. The appendix was intended to demonstrate a point he had made consistently throughout both books - that scholars, many of whom have their own personal religious allegiances, often focus on minutia as a way to deflect from the big picture impact of the scrolls on collective Biblical knowledge. Knowledge that for some can be uncomfortable to absorb. Wilson simply could have left it at that because an astute reader understood exactly his point. However, in his appendix, he includes a series of point / counterpoint letters between himself and an anonymous scholarly reviewer of another author’s book about the scrolls. Rather than making himself look good, instead, through the esoteric and bitchy back and forth, both ended up looking like petty cat-fighters. They were both trying to make scholarly points, but to the lay reader, the points didn’t mean much. Instead, I found myself thinking, “Would you both just give it a drink!”

Regardless, I greatly enjoyed the original Scrolls from the Dead Sea. It was exciting to read after having read about the gnostic gospels because it showed the connection between Judaism and Christianity at a time when both were evolving from semi-mythology into written, codified religions.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Mortybanks | 5 outras críticas | Mar 7, 2024 |
The Scrolls from the Dead Sea and The Dead Sea Scrolls 1947-1969
By Edmund Wilson

This is a review of Edmund Wilson’s original book about the Dead Sea Scrolls, published in 1955, and his updated and expanded book, published in 1969. Much like Elaine Pagels’ books about the Gnostic Gospels, Wilson’s books are about the history and interpretation of the Dead Sea scrolls, rather than a translation of the original texts. Wilson’s books, more than Pagels’, are full of high adventure and intrigue, especially because they take place in Palestine, a land notorious for religious and political upheaval, and because of the time in which they take place, from 1947, at the end of the British mandate, to 1969, two years after the Six-Day War between the Arabs and the Israelis. The Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered by a Bedouin boy in a cave along the western shore of the Dead Sea in 1947, two years after the discovery of the Nag Hammadi scrolls (gnostic gospels) in Egypt. Unlike the Nag Hammadi texts, which are Christian (written in Coptic), the Dead Sea Scrolls are Jewish (written in Hebrew). They are of interest, however, to both Jewish and Christian biblical scholars, although for different reasons.

Wilson explains why the discovery of the scrolls was problematic and upsetting for scholars and why it took some time for them to be accepted as authentic. He reminds us that up until about 400 BCE, the Israeli religion was practiced and handed down through oral tradition. Our earliest written Judeo-Christian scriptures are:

- [ ] The Alexandrian Septuagint (a Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible that dates from the third century BCE)
- [ ] St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate (a Latin translation of the Christian Bible that dates from the late fourth century CE)
- [ ] The Masoretic texts (a translation of the Hebrew Bible that dates from the ninth century CE)

It’s important to remember that almost all knowledge of the Bible, up until the 1947 discovery had come from a small set of texts that span from a period of about 1,300 years - 400 years before Christ with the Septuagint to 900 years after him with the Masoretic texts. As Wilson says, “It took some courage to face new materials where none had been imagined to exist.”

Wilson, one of America’s greatest literary critics, is a brilliant writer. He masterfully weaves a story that combines political intrigue, place-setting in a dry, dusty land where if only the fighting would stop so that archaeologists (several of whom are also clergy) can get on with it, and scholarly bickering and possessiveness of not only the scrolls but of their interpretation as well. His theory, or not so much his but the general consensus of what he believes are the more objective scholars, is that the Essenes, a Jewish communal society who lived from the second century BCE to the first CE, may have been the precedent for Christianity. At the start of his book, Wilson somewhat dryly describes the archaeology of the Essene monastery - the “cave” where the Bedouin boy unknowingly discovered the sect’s library. Much later, after he’s woven his fascinating tale, he connects the archaeological, religious, and historical dots with a beautiful sentence: “The monastery, this structure of stone that endures, between the bitter waters and precipitous cliffs, with its oven and its inkwells, its mill and its cesspool, its constellation of sacred fonts and the unadorned graves of its dead, is perhaps, more than Bethlehem or Nazareth, the cradle of Christianity.“

I enjoyed the original of Wilson’s book more than I did the expanded version. The original story was more compelling, and while the expanded version was certainly interesting, it didn’t capture the imagination quite so effectively. Additionally, Wilson weakened the aura of his story with an offputting appendix in the expanded version. The appendix was intended to demonstrate a point he had made consistently throughout both books - that scholars, many of whom have their own personal religious allegiances, often focus on minutia as a way to deflect from the big picture impact of the scrolls on collective Biblical knowledge. Knowledge that for some can be uncomfortable to absorb. Wilson simply could have left it at that because an astute reader understood exactly his point. However, in his appendix, he includes a series of point / counterpoint letters between himself and an anonymous scholarly reviewer of another author’s book about the scrolls. Rather than making himself look good, instead, through the esoteric and bitchy back and forth, both ended up looking like petty cat-fighters. They were both trying to make scholarly points, but to the lay reader, the points didn’t mean much. Instead, I found myself thinking, “Would you both just give it a drink!”

Regardless, I greatly enjoyed the original Scrolls from the Dead Sea. It was exciting to read after having read about the gnostic gospels because it showed the connection between Judaism and Christianity at a time when both were evolving from semi-mythology into written, codified religions.
… (mais)
 
Assinalado
Mortybanks | 5 outras críticas | Mar 7, 2024 |
 
Assinalado
aallegue | 24 outras críticas | Feb 4, 2024 |

Listas

Prémios

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Leon Edel Preface, Introduction, Editor

Estatísticas

Obras
93
Also by
37
Membros
8,057
Popularidade
#3,006
Avaliação
3.8
Críticas
76
ISBN
234
Línguas
8
Marcado como favorito
17

Tabelas & Gráficos