Retrato do autor

N. Lee Wood

Autor(a) de Looking for the Mahdi

10+ Works 521 Membros 17 Críticas 1 Favorited

About the Author

Também inclui: Lee Wood (1), Lee Jackson (6)

Disambiguation Notice:

(eng) Writes mystery novels (_Kingdom of Lies_, _Kingdom of Silence_) as "Lee Wood", though the first one was also published as by "N. Lee Wood".

Obras por N. Lee Wood

Looking for the Mahdi (1996) 192 exemplares
Bloodrights (1999) 120 exemplares
Faraday's Orphans (1996) — Autor — 78 exemplares
Master of None (2004) 47 exemplares
Kingdom of Lies (2005) 42 exemplares
Redemption (2007) 26 exemplares
Kingdom of Silence (2009) 13 exemplares

Associated Works

Sworn Allies (1990) — Contribuidor — 133 exemplares
Nightmare Carnival (2014) — Contribuidor — 44 exemplares
Welcome to Dystopia: 45 Visions of What Lies Ahead (2017) — Contribuidor — 34 exemplares
Strange Pleasures 2 (2003) — Contribuidor — 3 exemplares

Etiquetado

Conhecimento Comum

Nome legal
Wood, Nancy Lee
Outros nomes
Wood, Lee
Jackson, Lee
Data de nascimento
1955-11-15
Sexo
female
Nacionalidade
USA
Local de nascimento
Hartford, Connecticut, USA
Locais de residência
Connecticut, USA (Birthplace)
England, UK
Paris, France
New Zealand
Relações
Spinrad, Norman (ex-husband)
Nota de desambiguação
Writes mystery novels (_Kingdom of Lies_, _Kingdom of Silence_) as "Lee Wood", though the first one was also published as by "N. Lee Wood".

Membros

Críticas

 
Assinalado
beskamiltar | 8 outras críticas | Apr 10, 2024 |
2.5. Good writing and a page-turner, but this near-future SF thriller set in the Middle East felt shallow and dated 20 years after its publication. Which is a shame - it's not every science fiction novel that follows a plucky, sarcastic Arab-American foreign correspondent and a military cyborg with a heart of gold.
 
Assinalado
raschneid | 8 outras críticas | Dec 19, 2023 |
Guter poastapokalyptischer SF mit einigen für meinen Geschmack zu brutalen Szenen.
 
Assinalado
Stonerrockfan | 4 outras críticas | Oct 8, 2023 |
This book was published in 1996 and was nominated for an Arthur C. Clarke award in 1997. That's an indication of how good this debut novel is.

Kay Bee Suleiman is a journalist who rose to fame covering the war in Khuruchabja, an Arab nation with few natural resources. Kay Bee describes herself as "homely as a mud fence" when she dresses as a woman but dressed as a man her features were judged as distinguished. In Khuruchabja she had to pretend to be a man since women could not hold jobs. Covering that war was stressful so Kay Bee was happy to go back to work for the Global Broadcasting Network (GBN) behind the scenes, giving feed-ins for the on air personalities. Ten years later, she is requested/ordered to return to Khuruchabja to accompany a government asset who is an artificially intelligent and enhanced humanoid. John Halton looks human but he has mental and physical capabilities far greater than any person. The idea is that he will pose as Kay Bee's camera person until the time they meet the ruler of Khuruchabja, Lawrence Abdul bin Hassan al Samir al Rashid. Then John will become the king's bodyguard and Kay Bee will return home alone. Kay Bee hates the idea of returning to Khuruchabja but finds that she has no choice but to acquiesce. Unbeknownst to Kay Bee, John is also smuggling a computer chip into the country. Kay Bee may be unaware but other people know about it and want it. After they land in Khuruchabja their taxi driver delivers them to some people who will stop at nothing to find the chip. Fortunately, John is able to use his superhuman powers to kill the kidnappers but Kay Bee got pretty roughed up. That's when she learns about the chip and she is determined to find out what is on it. Through an old contact she is put in touch with a group of computer geeks. There are multiple layers of security on the chip and the final level requires a lot of computing power. They manage to get to play the final message for a short period of time and what they see is mind-blowing. Kay Bee and John don't know what to do with it except hand it over to the authorized contact. Kay Bee and John become close during the hours and days they spend together. John confides in Kay Bee that he is afraid he will be terminated since, to the government, he is just a piece of machinery. Kay Bee wants to help him but as they are constantly under surveillance it is difficult to change the planned handover. Could there possibly be a happy ending for Kay Bee and John? And what does the future hold for Khuruchabja? Read the book to answer these questions. I promise there will be twists and turns.

N. (which stands for Nancy) Lee Wood doesn't appear to have published anything since 2014 and she became a naturalized citizen of New Zealand in November, 2020. All of the books she has written appear to be out of print and there are no copies in my local library. That is a real shame since I am quite eager to read more of her writing. I guess I'll have to keep my eyes peeled at book sales and used book stores.
… (mais)
½
 
Assinalado
gypsysmom | 8 outras críticas | Jul 6, 2023 |

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Estatísticas

Obras
10
Also by
4
Membros
521
Popularidade
#47,687
Avaliação
½ 3.5
Críticas
17
ISBN
34
Línguas
1
Marcado como favorito
1

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