Massey Lectures

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Massey Lectures

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1Cecilturtle
Jan 4, 2009, 3:38 pm

The Massey Lectures have been around for almost 50 years and I am now just beginning to discover them (I'm a little late, I know).
I'm reading The Lost Massey Lectures, lectures from the early 60's that had been out of print and have now been bound in this new publication. I also have Atwood's series on debt to which I'm looking forward.

Do you have any favourites? Ones that you would particularly recommend? I'd like to find out more!

2rosemeria
Jan 4, 2009, 5:11 pm

The Massey Lectures are great -- my husband and I like to listen them during cars rides into town. One of my favorite Massey's was - Ronald Wright, A Short History of Progress (2004).
I just downloaded Ms. Atwood's lectures and I am looking forward to my next drive to town!

Link to some of the available Massey Lectures

3mountebank
Jan 4, 2009, 5:19 pm

I'm just discovering the series as well; I started with John Ralston Saul's The Unconscious Civilization and Michael Ignatieff's The Rights Revolution. Fantastic stuff.

4ripleyy
Editado: Jan 7, 2009, 4:57 pm

I read Race Against Time by Stephen Lewis about the problems in Africa (AIDS, education, poverty, etc.) and the world's failure to help. It took me forever to get through the first three lectures because the things he talked about made me both very angry and very sad so I ended up listening to the audio version for the final two lectures. Lewis's passion for the subject matter and the country came through clearly in both versions.

5Autodafe
Editado: Jan 7, 2009, 5:55 pm

I liked Jean Vanier's 'Becoming Human' and Margaret Visser's 'Beyond Fate.'

Vanier's experience as the founder of L'Arche, an international assisted-living organization that works with physically and mentally challenged people, is deeply moving.

Visser's history of the concept of 'fate' in human affairs is both intellectually stimulating and higly enjoyable.