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Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights,…
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Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor,… (edição 2004)

por Paul Farmer, Paul Farmer (Prefácio), Amartya Sen (Prefácio)

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5891029,892 (4.22)21
Pathologies of Power uses harrowing stories of life--and death--in extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience working in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world's poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. With passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other. Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are embodied as disease and death. Yet this book is far from a hopeless inventory of abuse. Farmer's disturbing examples are linked to a guarded optimism that new medical and social technologies will develop in tandem with a more informed sense of social justice. Otherwise, he concludes, we will be guilty of managing social inequality rather than addressing structural violence. Farmer's urgent plea to think about human rights in the context of global public health and to consider critical issues of quality and access for the world's poor should be of fundamental concern to a world characterized by the bizarre proximity of surfeit and suffering.… (mais)
Membro:Ronald_David
Título:Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor, With a New Preface by the Author (California Series in Public Anthropology, 4)
Autores:Paul Farmer
Outros autores:Paul Farmer (Prefácio), Amartya Sen (Prefácio)
Informação:University of California Press (2004), Edition: 1, Paperback, 438 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor por Paul Farmer

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Prior to my trip to Santa Fe, I finished reading Pathologies of Power: Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor, by Paul Farmer. I wanted to finish it up before I moderated our HIV/AIDS panel at CGS’s second annual conference. I wanted to see if there was any great material I could draw on for my portion of the panel.

This is a great book, which really helped drill in his concept of “a preferential option for the poor”. It laid out a solid epidemiological case and backed it up with deep ethnography. It seems that Paul’s combination of anthropology and medicine are perfect for confronting the deeper structural issues of modern plagues. He argues effectively about the fallacy of cost effectiveness. We must treat people with infectious diseases. It’s not fair to offer one class of people one thing and another class a lesser option. He also argues that treatment vs. prevention is a false dichotomy. With millions already infected with HIV and millions with TB (both regular and multiple drug resistant strains), we don’t have the option to exclude those who are already sick. Their sickness is often a manifestation of structural violence. The situations they find themselves in contribute as much, and often times more, to their infections than do their individual agency (ability to affect their own lives).

Infectious disease in the modern world is as much about class and politics as it is about bacteria and viruses.

I found an earlier book of his, [b:Infections and Inequalities|10233|Infections and Inequalities The Modern Plagues|Paul Farmer|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1166152608s/10233.jpg|12952]: The Modern Plagues, to be a better read. But this book is certainly one to have in your hand. I wanted to say have on your shelf, but these types of books need to be used, not just used to decorate your bookshelves. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience studying diseases in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world’s poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other.
  riselibrary_CSUC | Aug 24, 2020 |
I agree with what he says but I suppose it's not new to me. It's a older book, so what he said was probably innovative 10-15 years ago. However I LOVE Paul Farmer so that's mostly why it's a 4 ( )
  nheredia05 | Jun 12, 2018 |
2 copies
  AlanBudreau | Apr 3, 2018 |
Paul Farmer is a physician, anthropologist & prophet of social justice. He combines an unflinching moral stance - that the poor deserve health care just as much as the rich do - with scientific expertise & boundless dedication.
  jhawn | Jul 31, 2017 |
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Pathologies of Power uses harrowing stories of life--and death--in extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience working in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world's poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. With passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other. Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are embodied as disease and death. Yet this book is far from a hopeless inventory of abuse. Farmer's disturbing examples are linked to a guarded optimism that new medical and social technologies will develop in tandem with a more informed sense of social justice. Otherwise, he concludes, we will be guilty of managing social inequality rather than addressing structural violence. Farmer's urgent plea to think about human rights in the context of global public health and to consider critical issues of quality and access for the world's poor should be of fundamental concern to a world characterized by the bizarre proximity of surfeit and suffering.

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