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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of…
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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration (edição 2010)

por Isabel Wilkerson (Autor)

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3,7041462,538 (4.45)470
In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.… (mais)
Membro:brendanowicz
Título:The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
Autores:Isabel Wilkerson (Autor)
Informação:Random House (2010), Edition: Later prt., 640 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

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The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration por Isabel Wilkerson

Adicionado recentemente pormkvande, lisawithaja, OswinsSouffle, biblioteca privada, ejmw, BransonSchool, Clarior, claytonhowl
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Mostrando 1-5 de 146 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I read this as an audiobook, which I think worked better for me in absorbing the information despite it being about 22 hours of listening time. This was a hard book for me to get through. The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story fo America's Great Migration was very detailed, which I greatly appreciated. The fact that Wilkerson interviewed so many people really shows throughout the book. She focuses on the lives of 3 people in particular to convey how so many African Americans left their homes in the South in the hopes for a better life in the northern and western US states. I learned a lot more about the first half of the 19th century here in the US than I actually did in most of my US history courses up until university. I highly recommend this as a read, and I personally hope to get the physical book soon. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
Its one-year buildup as One Book One Chicago selection dared me to pick up this doorstop tome rather than simply think of it as one of those great books for which I'd never find time. There was a deadline to meet, three weeks till the local library's discussion group meeting. Fortunately, the book's narrative structure made it an easy read despite the length, with a canny way of organizing a sprawling topic that assured the result would not turn bloodless. Once as a scholarship judge I had to confront a work sample co-bylined with Isabel Wilkerson, which made it hard to tell who wrote what yet suggested that as a journalist Wilkerson would have been an awesome mentor. Her research on this project ranges widely before she chooses to follow three families in the Great Migration, but the prodigious prep work is not wasted. Wilkerson migrates from the sociological to the personal and back again; the shifting perspectives keep her from getting too academic or oracular, and her subjects from wearing out their welcome. The many turns in their lives all end in a bittersweet place despite the distance they've come; they're rueful prophets without honor, unable to escape danger and self-doubt. An unusual aspect of Wilkerson's point of view, emphasized in the Chicago Public Library programming, is that Wilkerson encourages us to think about the Great Migration as any other migration story, driven by people with the same restless urges as my own grandparents. Yet Wilkerson treats the Southern diaspora less like economic refugees than political prisoners, escaping their hereditary caste and a constant threat of barbarism. The discussion group turned out to be me, librarian Amanda and book-group regular Hector. Possibly a thinner book would have drawn a larger crowd, but would not have fed such a wide-ranging discussion. I came through with a much better understanding of my neighbors, and another book to return with next month.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
I've been meaning to read for years,and finally ordered a copy for my staycation this week. It is a great book, covering a massive demographic shift, "the Great Migration" of African-Americans from the South to the North and West, through the frame of three specific oral histories of three different people who made the move. I had to put it down at times because I was reading too fast.

Looking forward to Isabel Wilkerson's upcoming boo. ( )
  brett.sovereign | Jul 10, 2021 |
nonfiction - African American history 1910s-1970s, across the nation. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Isabel Wilkerson has done extensive research into what is known as The Great Migration, during which Black people living in the American South moved North or West seeking better opportunities and/or less persecution. Wilkerson dives extensively into the stories of three people, representing typical experiences by those who migrated. Ida Mae Gladney follows her husband north to Chicago and Milwaukee; George Starling leaves for New York, but also spends most of his career as a porter traveling the North-South train route and thereby encountering other migrants and keeping a tenuous connection to relatives in the South, and Robert Pershing follows his dream of becoming a well-respected doctor in California. Interspersed amongst these narratives, which involve interviews with these individuals as well as friends and family and covering decades of their lives, are shorter essays and vignettes about other migrants and the general history and zeitgeist of the time.
The book is long, but a relatively quick read as the reader is drawn into the stories of these individuals and others. The factual and historical portions of the book are well written, not a slog, and don't really interrupt the flow of the book. This is an information-dense book, but for a general audience as opposed to academics.
I had the good fortune to read this for my book club which prompted some great discussions about the treatment of Black Americans by racist white people as well as people who were probably not really racist themselves, but did not feel they could be openly supportive of Black people's plight for fear of endangering themselves or their livelihoods. It is also stunning, but not necessarily surprising to those who have done some reading on the topic, of how the government, law enforcement, and local neighborhood groups did everything in their power to vilify, demonize, exclude and marginalize newly freed Black Americans even (!) in the "liberal" North and West.
I very much recommend this book. ( )
  EmScape | Jun 22, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 146 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I give this book two enthusiastic thumbs up: you’ll not only learn a lot about this underappreciated part of recent America history (I see its remnants about me every day in Chicago, since I live on the South Side, perhaps the most famous destination of the Migration), but also become deeply involved in the lives of Ida Mae, George, and Robert. The ending is poignant and bittersweet, and will make you both proud of the migrants and sad about their fate. The writing is quite good (Wilkerson won a Pulitzer Prize for journalism—the first black woman to do so—for her work at The New York Times), and the scholarship, though thorough, is worn lightly. (The book was 15 years in the making and Wilkerson interviewed over 1200 people.) If there’s one flaw—and it’s a small one—the writing is occasionally awkward and more than occasionally repetitious, with the same facts repeated in different places. But that’s a trifle that should by no means put you off.
 
Wilkerson intersperses historical detail of the broader movement and the sparks that set off the civil rights era; challenging racial restrictions in the North and South; and the changing dynamics of race, class, geography, politics, and economics. A sweeping and stunning look at a watershed event in U.S. history.
adicionada por sduff222 | editarBooklist, Vanessa Bush (Sep 15, 2010)
 
Wilkerson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, uses the journeys of three of them-a Mississippi sharecropper, a Louisiana doctor, and a Florida laborer--to etch an indelible and compulsively readable portrait of race, class, and politics in 20th-century America. History is rarely distilled so finely.
adicionada por ArrowStead | editarEntertainment Weekly, Tina Jordan (Sep 10, 2010)
 
Not since Alex Haley's Roots has there been a history of equal literary quality where the writing surmounts the rhythmic soul of fiction, where the writer's voice sings a song of redemptive glory as true as Faulkner's southern cantatas.
adicionada por ArrowStead | editarSan Francisco Examiner
 
The Warmth of Other Suns is a brilliant and stirring epic, the first book to cover the full half century of the Great Migration....Wilkerson combines impressive research...with great narrative and literary power. Ms. Wilkerson does for the Great Migration what John Steinbeck did for the Okies in his fiction masterpiece, The Grapes of Wrath; she humanizes history, giving it emotional and psychological depth.
adicionada por ArrowStead | editarThe Wall Street Journal
 

» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Wilkerson, Isabelautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Burns, KenIntroduçãoautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Miles, RobinNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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I was leaving the South
To fling myself into the unknown. . . .
I was taking a part of the South
To transplant in alien soil,
To see if it could grow differently.
If it could drink of new and cool rains,
Bend in strange winds,
Respond to the warmth of other suns
And, perhaps, to bloom.

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To my mother and
to the memory of my father,
whose migration made me possible,
and to the millions of others like them
who dared to act upon their dreams.
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The night clouds were closing in on the salt licks east of the oxbow lakes along the folds in the earth beyond the Yalobusha River.
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In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life. From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America.

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