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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance:…
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Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values (original 1974; edição 2005)

por Robert M Pirsig (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
16,765250233 (3.81)239
A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, this book becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:daturvey
Título:Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values
Autores:Robert M Pirsig (Autor)
Informação:William Morrow Paperbacks (2005), Edition: 1R, 464 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry into Values por Robert M. PIRSIG (Author) (1974)

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    Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work por Matthew B. Crawford (prehensel)
  2. 00
    The Road por Cormac McCarthy (SCPeterson)
    SCPeterson: A man and his son travel very different paths toward self-discovery, confronting ultimate truth and the source of all meaning along the way
  3. 00
    A Fraction of the Whole por Steve Toltz (jeff.s.thomson)
  4. 00
    My Mercedes is Not for Sale: From Amsterdam to Ouagadougou...An Auto-Misadventure Across the Sahara por Jeroen van Bergeijk (gonzobrarian)
    gonzobrarian: an inquiry into travel, adventure, and meaning
  5. 01
    Stranger in a Strange Land (Uncut Edition) por Robert A. Heinlein (emf1123)
    emf1123: If you're in your late teens, reading both of these books back to back (stranger in a strange land, zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance) is a good quality mindfuck. I doubt that either have the same influence as one ages, though.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 250 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
good, pretty interesting read, if only for exposure to the names of some old philosophers

took me a little while to understand what was going on too, so i guess thats a good thing

also very interesting to read this at the same time as "Is God a Mathematician?" (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3095024-is-god-a-mathematician), at least at the beginning of this book it seems to be asking the same question
  royragsdale | Sep 22, 2021 |
I understand why this book is conserved a type of modern classic. It definitely offers an alternative lens to view the world. The storyline in between the philosophy helps relate some of the broader concepts and was inserted in just the right spots to lighten up the deeper content. However I felt the storyline was a little underdeveloped, I never was able to fully embrace emotion for the characters, they always felt detached, but in someway I guess that was the point. They were not what the book was about, just a type of vehicle to bring the true story to the readers attention ( )
  Crystal199 | Sep 13, 2021 |
This book...it has a hold on me.

You look at where you're going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you've been and a pattern seems to emerge.

This is very likely the fifth or sixth time I've read it, making it the most-read book in my life. What is it about this story that draws me back in every two to three years?

When one person suffers from a delusion, it is called insanity. When many people suffer from a delusion it is called a Religion.

I will state right up front that the last quarter of the book, where Phaedrus really comes to the fore, it does become quite dense with all its talk of Aristotle, Plato, and Socrates, of Sophists and dialectics, etc. And it tends to lose me a bit.

You are never dedicated to something you have complete confidence in. No one is fanatically shouting that the sun is going to rise tomorrow. They know it's going to rise tomorrow. When people are fanatically dedicated to political or religious faiths or any other kinds of dogmas or goals, it's always because these dogmas or goals are in doubt.

But the rest of it? The ruminations on the world at large and our place in it? The thoughts on what, precisely, quality is and how it works? The breaking down of complex ideas into motorcycle maintenance analogies? The travelogue? The interaction with the unnamed main character and those around him? And Chris, the narrator's son? All of it is so compelling to me.

The place to improve the world is first in one's own heart and head and hands, and then work outward from there.

There's a certain duplicitousness in Pirsig's narrative because, as he seeks to reconcile his past self with where and who he is now, while also struggling to piece together Phaedrus' discoveries and layering his own understanding on them, he's also mostly avoiding the most immediate problem right in front of him...Chris, his own son.

If someone's ungrateful and you tell him he's ungrateful, okay, you've called him a name. You haven't solved anything.

I think it's the feeling of displacement, the narrator's obvious separation from the world. It's like it's all behind a glass wall. He can see it all, appreciate its beauty ...its quality... and he can interact with others, but there's always something between him and whoever or whatever he's reacting to. There's a point where he describes the moment of quality as a moment of time between the subject and the object where the quality aspect is determined. It's like the narrator holds everyone out behind that wall to allow him more time to judge their quality.

And that's something I can truly identify with. That removal. That separation from the world.

The truth knocks on the door and you say, "Go away, I'm looking for the truth," and so it goes away. Puzzling.

And so, I find that I cannot be objective about this book. This book burrows beneath my skin in a way no other book has before or, I presume, ever will again. Each time I read it, I rediscover essential truths about the world, about myself. They are not pleasant discoveries, but they are essential ones.

We take a handful of sand from the endless landscape of awareness around us and call that handful of sand the world.

I can fully understand why others would not like this book, that it would be ponderously slow, or unnecessarily preachy, or simply not of good quality. But for me, this book makes me think in ways I would never have done so without reading it. And that, to me, is what the best writing should do. Make me pause and examine myself and my world.

We’re in such a hurry most of the time we never get much chance to talk. The result is a kind of endless day-to-day shallowness, a monotony that leaves a person wondering years later where all the time went and sorry that it’s all gone. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
I have had a copy of this on my TBR for a few years now and I have no idea where my copy came from. Talking about books in general inspired one of my work mates to read it towards the end of last year but he struggled to really summarise the book for me. I picked this up to read the other day completely on a whim, I had no idea what the book was about except to say that it is considered a classic.

The book is actually three stories/parts all rolled together in a mash of ideas about life. The anchor story is one of a cross country journey on motorcycle of a father, his young son and 2 friends. This is a bit of a travelogue in a similar vein to On The Road as they camp and stick to small roads along the way. The second story evolves into how a person loses their mind and ends up in a mental institute, this person is given the name Phaedrus. The final aspect to the book is the author's explanation and insight into the philosophy of quality. I'll look at the 3 stories/parts separately.

The road story was my favourite part of the book and I would have been happy to read that on it's own in a novella. It is clearly written with some really affection for both his son, Chris and the way American still was at the time in small towns. His avoidance of freeways and favouring small mom and pop diners rather than large garish chain affairs is something that resonates. The characters were fine and I started to really like their travel companions.

The story of Phaedrus started with so much promise and I was really looking forward to find out more once I had established who Phaedrus was. This story was good in places and bad in others. The conflict university staff was good and his back story was interesting but it was very haphazard in the presentation. Phaedrus is obviously meant to be smarter than everyone else, it's just than no one else can see this.

The final part is the thing which really spoiled my enjoyment of the book. If Pirsig wanted to make sure that certain readers felt stupid then he achieved that with me. A few parts of this really struck a chord with me, these mainly involving engineering. The rest of it was largely rambling about philosophy which was way above my head and I suspect above the head's of many who have read or attempted to read this book. There are a handful of zen references thrown in along the way but again these will probably only grasped by scholars. I can see why this level of thinking would send someone into mental meltdown.

After I had read the book I read a few articles on Pirsig and these reveal that he had an IQ of 170 at a young age. I suspect that you would require a love of philosophy (and major in it) or a huge IQ to really appreciate this book. I have neither. The final rating is mainly down to the travelogue and engineering references in it. ( )
  Brian. | Jul 24, 2021 |
I don't know what triggered the thought, but I remembered reading this book some years back. Not only that, but I recalled much of the story so it must have made an impression on me.

Blurb:
One of the most important and influential books written in the past half-century, Robert M. Pirsig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is a powerful, moving, and penetrating examination of how we live . . . and a breathtaking meditation on how to live better. Here is the book that transformed a generation: an unforgettable narration of a summer motorcycle trip across America's Northwest, undertaken by a father and his young son. A story of love and fear -- of growth, discovery, and acceptance -- that becomes a profound personal and philosophical odyssey into life's fundamental questions, this uniquely exhilarating modern classic is both touching and transcendent, resonant with the myriad confusions of existence . . . and the small, essential triumphs that propel us forward.
End blurb.

To me this was more of a philosophical treatise on how we perceive quality, but done in a story like fashion so one's eyes don't glaze over :-) I don't know about it transforming a generation, but I do remember finding it an interesting read. ( )
  LGCullens | Jun 1, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 250 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
One is tempted to call the book a psychomelodrama, for Pirsig's intentions are as extravagant as his themes. The attempt to triumph over madness, suicide, death in the self, of his son, for our world, by means of the patient exploration of ideas and emotions is certainly an extravagant ambition. That he succeeds in finding a plausible catharsis through such an enterprise seems to me sufficient reward for the author's perseverance, and ample testimony to his honesty and courage.
adicionada por Shortride | editarThe New York Times Book Review, Edward Abbey (sítio Web pago) (Mar 30, 1975)
 
Whatever it's true philosophical worth, it is intellectual entertainment of the highest order.
adicionada por Shortride | editarThe New York Times, Christopher Lehmann-Haupt (sítio Web pago) (Apr 16, 1974)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (18 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
PIRSIG, Robert M.Autorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bacon, PaulDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jonkers, RonaldTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
JONKERS, RonaldTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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And what is good, Phaedrus,

And what is not good -

Need we ask anyone to tell us these things?
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for my family
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I can see by my watch, without taking my hand from the left grip of the cycle, that it is eight-thirty in the morning.
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A narration of a summer motorcycle trip undertaken by a father and his son, this book becomes a personal and philosophical odyssey into fundamental questions on how to live. The narrator's relationship with his son leads to a powerful self-reckoning; the craft of motorcycle maintenance leads to an austerely beautiful process for reconciling science, religion, and humanism. Resonant with the confusions of existence, this classic is a touching and transcendent book of life.--From publisher description.

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813 — Literature American and Canadian American fiction

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