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Dame, König, As, Spion. por John le Carré
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Dame, König, As, Spion. (original 1974; edição 1987)

por John le Carré

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6,872190990 (4.04)450
British agent George Smiley hunts for a mole in the Secret Service and begins his epic game of international chess with his Soviet counterpart, an agent named Karla.
Membro:pefol
Título:Dame, König, As, Spion.
Autores:John le Carré
Informação:München : Heyne, (1987), Taschenbuch
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:DZ Regal Couch

Pormenores da obra

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy por John le Carré (1974)

  1. 20
    The Honourable Schoolboy por John le Carré (longway)
  2. 10
    Game, Set & Match (Berlin Game ; Mexico Set ; London Match) por Len Deighton (John_Vaughan)
    John_Vaughan: Another great trilogy.
  3. 00
    Declare por Tim Powers (LamontCranston)
  4. 00
    A Legacy of Spies por John le Carré (dajashby)
  5. 00
    The Reluctant Fundamentalist por Mohsin Hamid (tandah)
    tandah: A different era, but similar pacing and sense of foreboding.
  6. 11
    The Odessa File por Frederick Forsyth (John_Vaughan)
    John_Vaughan: More perfect atmosphere.
  7. 11
    The Spy Who Came In from the Cold por John le Carré (John_Vaughan)
    John_Vaughan: Setting the oeuvre.
  8. 12
    The Atrocity Archives por Charles Stross (wvlibrarydude)
  9. 27
    Red Rabbit por Tom Clancy (Hedgepeth)
    Hedgepeth: Red Rabbit is any early case in Jack Ryans career that is not as action driven as some of the other novels. It moves a little faster than Tinker, Tailor but should still appeal to those who appreciate a more methodical pace.
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» Ver também 450 menções

Inglês (178)  Francês (3)  Espanhol (2)  Holandês (2)  Alemão (1)  Sueco (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Hebraico (1)  Todas as línguas (189)
Mostrando 1-5 de 189 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
From the very begining I knew that something was up with Bill Haydon. Their excuse for his affair with Smiley's wife was that it was "too obvioius" and would allay blame, but that was the exact thing that made me suspect him. The other potential moles were simple social climbers and bully boys, but betraying one's country and one's friend are very much in the same deceptive vein. Maybe it works differently for men, but I suspect that it's exactly the same as with women. ( )
  JaimieRiella | Feb 25, 2021 |
Mole Hunt
Review of the Pan Books paperback edition (1979) of the 1974 original

There are three of them, and Alleline. - Control voices his suspicions about the possible traitors inside the Circus in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

He gave me a drink and we sat there like a pair of schoolboys making up a code, me and Control. We used Tinker, Tailor. We sat there in the flat putting it together, drinking that cheap Cyprus sherry he always gave. If I couldn't get out, if there was any fumble after I'd met Stevcek, if I had to go underground, I must get the one word to him even if I had to go to Prague and chalk it on the Embassy door or ring the Prague resident and yell at him down the phone. Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor. Alleline was Tinker, Haydon was Tailor, Bland was Soldier and Toby Esterhase was Poorman. We dropped Sailor because it rhymed with Tailor. You were Beggarman. - Jim Prideaux explains Control's code words to George Smiley from pg. 245 of the Pan Books paperback of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy

Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy remains my favourite Carré novel after 40 years. It was probably the first one that I had ever read as it likely came to my attention due to the Alec Guinness TV-miniseries from that time. After several interim re-reads it has not lost any of its entertaining intrigue and occasional humour. Having read all of the Smiley and Circus novels, this one provides the greatest breadth in its journey through the various misfits that make up Carré's fictional version of the British Secret Intelligence Service. I now have more appreciation for the nuances and parallels of the imagined or real betrayals of the love relationships of the various characters as well, Guillam's doubts about Camilla, Smiley's bitter acceptance of Ann, Prideaux's suspicions of Haydon, etc. Prideaux's bonding with Roach as fellow outcasts and 'new-boys' remains a delight.

I re-read Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy due to the recent passing of novelist John le Carré (penname of David Cornwell) (October 19, 1931 – December 12, 2020). His death brought back memories of my first readings of his Cold War novels in the 1970s. Those were probably the first books of somewhat 'serious' writing that I had ever read, after developing an early love of reading with detective and science fiction novels in my teenage years. I had saved all of those paperbacks as well, so it seemed like a good time for some retrospective re-reads.

Trivia and Links
Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy was filmed as a TV-miniseries in 1979 with Alex Guinness in the role of George Smiley. The 6-episode edit (the original was edited into 7-episodes) can be viewed on YouTube starting with Episode One here. The 2016 postings are still available to view as of early 2021.

Tinker, Tailor, Solider, Spy was also filmed as a movie in 2011 with Gary Oldman in the role of George Smiley. A trailer for that adaptation can be viewed here. ( )
  alanteder | Feb 5, 2021 |
I've accumulated a bunch of le Carré novels over the years, and I saw the movie version of this a few years back, but this is the first time I've actually sat down and read it. I think the parts focused around Smiley and his investigation are really great - by the time the big reveal of the mole rolled around, my heart was pounding. I think where it falls apart, though, is in the spy-politics parts - there's a lot of lingering on the depictions of the different potentates of the Circus that mostly feels like wasted time by the end. Overall, though, quite good. ( )
  skolastic | Feb 2, 2021 |
> La revue de presse (Le Figaro et AFP agence) - Publié le 14/12/2020
Il s'agit d'une chasse à l'agent double dans les couloirs du « Cirque », comme Le Carré surnommait le service de renseignements extérieurs du Royaume-Uni (MI6).
Ce roman fait partie d'une trilogie des années 1970: le héros timide de Le Carré, George Smiley, y déjoue les pièges de son rival soviétique, Karla.
Le roman a été adapté à la télévision - avec Alec Guinness pour incarner Smiley - et au cinéma en 2011, avec une distribution de stars comprenant Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, John Hurt et Benedict Cumberbatch.

> L'espion qui venait du froid, Un pur espion, La Taupe... Les livres qui ont fait la gloire de John Le Carré
Décédé à l'âge de 89 ans, le romancier britannique laisse derrière lui vingt-cinq ouvrages au succès colossal. L'ancien employé du MI6 a vu une grande partie de son œuvre adaptée au cinéma.
Maître britannique du roman d'espionnage et auteur au succès aussi bien critique que public, John le Carré est décédé à l'âge de 89 ans. Durant sa longue carrière, l'écrivain a publié 25 livres, qui se sont écoulés à quelque 60 millions d'exemplaires dans le monde entier. Voici un choix non exhaustif de ses œuvres les plus admirées, pour la plupart adaptées sur grand écran, depuis le début d ses débuts en 1961 jusqu'en 2011. … ; (en ligne),
URL : https://amp-lefigaro-fr.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.lefigaro.fr/livres/le-directe...
  Joop-le-philosophe | Jan 22, 2021 |
A labyrinthine, oblique and thoroughly engaging tale from the world of secret intelligence. Le Carré at his finest. ( )
  Lirmac | Jan 14, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 189 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
10 of the Greatest Cold War Spy Novels
“Like Fleming, Le Carré (real name: David John Moore Cornwall) worked for British intelligence. But where Fleming used his WW 2 experiences as a springboard for fantasy, Le Carre turned his Cold War service into grimly realistic novels. The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (1963) trumped Deighton as a response to James Bond’s glamourous world of espionage, and he continues to turn out fine work to this day. Tinker charts the search for a Soviet mole in the upper echelons of British intelligence, providing Le Carré’s signature character – the low-key professional George Smiley – with a late-in-the-game chance to reclaim his standing in the Circus (MI6), made bittersweet by betrayal. A fine BBC serialization in 1974 was followed by an equally well-received feature-film version in 2011.”
 
Karla is finally lured across a Berlin bridge and into the West. But, again, what figure is cut by the evil mastermind when he appears? “He wore a grimy shirt and a black tie: he looked like a poor man going to the funeral of a friend.” Le Carré has never written a better sentence, one so impatient of ideology and so attentive to what he, following W. H. Auden, describes plainly as “the human situation.” The television series of “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” has lost none of its grip, and the new film will recruit new friends to the cause; but if we seek George Smiley and his people, with their full complement of terrors, illusions, and shames, we should follow the example of the ever-retiring Smiley, and go back to our books. That’s the truth
adicionada por John_Vaughan | editarNew Yorker, Anthony Lane (Dec 14, 2011)
 
The power of the novel is that le Carré transfigured espionage – its techniques, failures and deceptions – into a rich metaphor combining national decay, the disintegration of certainties with advancing age, the impossibility of knowing another human being's mind, the fragility of all trust and loyalty.
adicionada por thorold | editarThe Observer, Neal Ascherson (Sep 11, 2011)
 
"Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" is fluently written; it is full of vivid character sketches of secret agents and bureaucrats from all levels of British society , and the dialogue catches their voices well. The social and physical details of English life and the day to day activities of the intelligence service at home and abroad are convincing. Unlike many writers Le Carré is at his best showing men hard at work; he is fascinated by the office politics of the agency since the war.
adicionada por John_Vaughan | editarNY Times, Richard Locke (Jul 20, 1974)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (10 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
le Carré, Johnautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Davidson, FrederickNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Greenburger, FrancescoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jayston, MichaelNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Laing, TimIlustradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Soellner, HeddaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Soellner, RolfTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Taylor, MattArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Woolfitt, AdamArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Tinker,
Tailor,
Soldier,
Sailor,
Rich Man,
Poor Man,
Beggarman,
Thief.

Small children's fortune-telling rhyme used when counting cherry stones, waistcoat buttons, daisy petals, or the seeds of the Timothy grass.
- from the Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes
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For James Bennett and Dusty Rhodes in memory.
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The truth is, if old Major Dover hadn't dropped dead at Taunton races Jim would never have come to Thursgood's at all.
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British agent George Smiley hunts for a mole in the Secret Service and begins his epic game of international chess with his Soviet counterpart, an agent named Karla.

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