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The Adventures of Binkle and Flip por Enid…
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The Adventures of Binkle and Flip (edição 1967)

por Enid Blyton (Autor)

Séries: Binkle and Flip (1)

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793270,898 (3)Nenhum(a)
Binkle and Flip are two very bad and bold rabbits who are always playing jokes on the people of Oak Tree Town, either to get out of doing any honest work, or just to be plain rascally. Each time they get caught and promise never to do anything bad again. But it doesn't last long. AUTHOR: Enid Blyton is one of the most-loved authors in children's publishing. With over 700 titles published, Enid Blyton's stories remain timeless classics, adored by children throughout the world. Soon after Enid Blyton was born in 1897, she fell gravely ill with whooping cough. Her father, Thomas Blyton stayed up with her night after night until her cough subsided and she recovered. From that time on, Enid followed her father wherever he went, and it was through her father that she developed a love of nature and animals - an enthusiasm which stayed with her throughout her life. It was also her father who instilled in Enid her love of books, and she would often be seen sneaking into her father's library and borrowing a pile of books. As a young woman Enid was faced with many choices; her father had planned a career in music for her, while she felt drawn to writing. In the end, she became a teacher, though her passion for writing never dwindled. In 1922, a collection of poems by Enid was published - it was her first step toward her dream of becoming an author. At 27 years old, Enid married Hugh Pollock and moved to London. Enid had two children with Hugh, and soon after wrote her first novel, The Adventures of the Wishing Chair. Enid divorced Hugh after almost 20 years of marriage, and remarried Kenneth Waters in 1943. Throughout the 40 and 50s, Enid wrote books at a colossal pace: adventure stories, mysteries, magical stories, farming stories, stories for younger children, best-selling series like The Famous Five and Noddy...her writing knew no bounds! Apart from breaks to play golf and spend time with her children, Enid's working week was consumed with writing new stories, correcting proofs and answering the hundreds of letters she was, by now, receiving weekly. She explained that her characters evolved organically and her stories seemed to naturally form, she described herself as "merely a sightseer, a reporter, and interpreter." Enid fell ill with Alzheimer's disease in her old and she died in 1963. Her spirit lives on in her books and she is remembered as one of the most-loved and celebrated children's authors.… (mais)
Membro:CDeasey
Título:The Adventures of Binkle and Flip
Autores:Enid Blyton (Autor)
Informação:Dean (1967), 185 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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The Adventures of Binkle and Flip por Enid Blyton

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Not one of my favourite Enid Blytons, but I still enjoyed it. ( )
  Tara_Calaby | Jun 22, 2020 |
Binkle and Flip are a pair of very naughty bunny rabbits who live in Oak Tree Town. Binkle is usually the instigator of many of the practical jokes that are played on the residents of Oak Tree Town; and he somehow always manages to get Flip involved in all of his schemes. From masquerading as chimney sweeps, to fooling their neighbor Herbert the Hedgehog into becoming a carnival attraction, Binkle and Flip are determined to make as much mischief as possible.

At least until Wily Weasel the policeman catches them and makes them apologize. Each time that the bunnies are caught, they promise never to be naughty again but it doesn't last for long. I must say that I have never read this book before - or maybe I have and just can't remember when - but I still enjoyed reading this book very much. I have always enjoyed Enid Blyton as an author, and while this particular book was quite dated, I still found it very sentimental and nostalgic reading. I'm definitely putting this book back on my 'childhood favorites' shelf. I would give this book a B+! ( )
  rubyandthetwins | Mar 18, 2017 |
THIS REVIEW HAS PICTURES. Please refer to the review on Goodreads (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/793285617)

This is a collection of short children's stories that were originally written in and around 1925 but have later been published as a collection. The stories are about a couple of con-bunnies (I can't really say con-men because first of all that would be sexist, and secondly they are not human, they are bunnies). In fact, pretty much all of the stories (with the exception of a couple) are about how they get up to mischief, and also about schemes in which they go out and try to make money for themselves.
This is clear right from the first story where Binkle (who seems to be the brains of the operations) manages to get himself hired as a nanny for a couple of foxes (which no doubt will end up quite badly because we all know that foxes like to eat bunnies) but they do end up escaping (with the money as well). Then there is another really clever trick where they get an empty piece of canvas, put a frame around it, and claim that it is a magic painting that only smart people can see, and because nobody wants to admit that they are stupid, they all claim to be able to see the picture, but only comment on the sky (and the hedgehog) because that is the only thing that everybody agrees is on the painting (and they don't want to suggest that there is something that is not on the painting because that will expose their stupidity).
There is also the other scam where Binkle is asked to look after his uncle's medicine shop, so to try to increase the profits, Flip disguises himself as a doctor and prescribes things from the shop, and when the remedies have the opposite effect (like turning people green) the doctor mysteriously disappears, and Binkle pleads innocence (and gets away with it) because he was only filling out prescriptions that the doctor was issuing (who has now conveniently disappeared).
The last story in the book though has the tables turned on Binkle and Flip where the Weasel (who is also the local police officer) tricks them and makes a complete fool of them, which results in them putting aside their evil ways and becoming good bunnies again.
I have suggested this before in some of Blyton's other books which run along the same themes, and that is that I really do not like the books where the protagonists are naughty and have them actually get away with their hair-brained schemes. This book is no different, though I must admit that I liked the fact that they were little more than a couple of con-bunnies. Mind you, some of Blyton's books simply have a rather stupid character (such as Mr Pinkwhistle and Mr Meddle) getting into trouble because, well, the character is just plain stupid. However it is clear that Binkle and Flip don't fall into that category.
One of the things that I liked about this book is that I discovered a new animal named a polecat. I had never heard of a polecat before, and I gather from this book that polecats are generally not liked. So, what I did what I always do when I want to find something out and that is that I go to Wikipedia (as one generally does when one does not know something) and discovered that a polecat looks like this:

[Polecat Picture]

Anyway, if you don't know what a polecat is (and sometimes a picture doesn't actually tell you what it is, only what it looks like) then you can find out more here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polecat), but what I can say is that they are from the same family as ferrets and weasels (and possibly meercats, but I can't say for certain). Anyway, I also learned that they are sort of like skunks, which is probably why people don't like them. ( )
  David.Alfred.Sarkies | Jan 12, 2014 |
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Binkle and Flip are two very bad and bold rabbits who are always playing jokes on the people of Oak Tree Town, either to get out of doing any honest work, or just to be plain rascally. Each time they get caught and promise never to do anything bad again. But it doesn't last long. AUTHOR: Enid Blyton is one of the most-loved authors in children's publishing. With over 700 titles published, Enid Blyton's stories remain timeless classics, adored by children throughout the world. Soon after Enid Blyton was born in 1897, she fell gravely ill with whooping cough. Her father, Thomas Blyton stayed up with her night after night until her cough subsided and she recovered. From that time on, Enid followed her father wherever he went, and it was through her father that she developed a love of nature and animals - an enthusiasm which stayed with her throughout her life. It was also her father who instilled in Enid her love of books, and she would often be seen sneaking into her father's library and borrowing a pile of books. As a young woman Enid was faced with many choices; her father had planned a career in music for her, while she felt drawn to writing. In the end, she became a teacher, though her passion for writing never dwindled. In 1922, a collection of poems by Enid was published - it was her first step toward her dream of becoming an author. At 27 years old, Enid married Hugh Pollock and moved to London. Enid had two children with Hugh, and soon after wrote her first novel, The Adventures of the Wishing Chair. Enid divorced Hugh after almost 20 years of marriage, and remarried Kenneth Waters in 1943. Throughout the 40 and 50s, Enid wrote books at a colossal pace: adventure stories, mysteries, magical stories, farming stories, stories for younger children, best-selling series like The Famous Five and Noddy...her writing knew no bounds! Apart from breaks to play golf and spend time with her children, Enid's working week was consumed with writing new stories, correcting proofs and answering the hundreds of letters she was, by now, receiving weekly. She explained that her characters evolved organically and her stories seemed to naturally form, she described herself as "merely a sightseer, a reporter, and interpreter." Enid fell ill with Alzheimer's disease in her old and she died in 1963. Her spirit lives on in her books and she is remembered as one of the most-loved and celebrated children's authors.

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