Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Yellow Yacht

por Ron Roy

Outros autores: John Steven Gurney (Ilustrador)

Séries: A to Z Mysteries (book 25)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
777521,119 (4.17)5
Dink, Josh, and Ruth Rose help catch the thieves who have stolen gold from Sammi's parents, the king and queen of Costra.
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 5 menções

Mostrando 5 de 5
00000856
  lcslibrarian | Aug 13, 2020 |
In my opinion, the book "A to Z Mysteries: The Yellow Yacht," is a great book for young readers. One thing I liked about this book was that it was a chapter book, but did include pictures and words that were in larger print so that readers can have a better idea of what is going on in the story. For example, page 76 has text at the top of the page, and an illustration at the bottom of the page of the water and boats with the accused robber in the story getting away. The illustrations are also in black and white which I also liked as well because they were simple and didn't distract from the text. I also really liked that this book was somewhat interactive, and as a beginning chapter book, I think it is important to keep the reader engaged since they may have been used to picture books. This book gives the opportunity for the reader to predict who was the robber on the island and keeps the reader eager to find out. For example, page 67 reads: "Suddenly Dink knew why Sundown's green stripe was missing. He felt his heart start to race. Goose bumps marched up his arms. 'Guys, I think I know where the gold is,' Dink said. Since you have to turn the page to read on which also begins another chapter, the reader can predict where the gold is based on the prior clues in the text. The big idea of the story was that working together can help you solve problems and potentially help you solve a mystery. ( )
  khendr4 | Oct 30, 2014 |
This book and all the others were amazing. I've always been so excited to read the next one. My favorite part was when the yacht owner caught Ruth Rose and Josh snooping. ( )
  catnor | Nov 15, 2011 |
(Don't forget my kid-lit blog as well; it's at http://kidlit4adults.blogspot.com .)

A friend has convinced me to try my hand this year at writing children's literature; but I don't actually know anything about children's literature, so am starting the process simply by reading a large selection of titles that have been recommended to me. I've been told that these, the "A to Z Mysteries" by Ron Roy (a 26-book series, each named after a different letter in the alphabet) are among the most popular "chapter books" these days among the elementary-school readers they're designed for (so in other words, aged roughly 7 to 10); and indeed, after reading three of them myself (U, X and Y), I can see that they touch on nearly every piece of advice I've now been given regarding writing for this age group, including a strong sense of humor, a quickly-paced but not too complicated storyline, lots of action and mystery, many scenes set in a school environment, and sentences that average around ten words. (Note, however, that these books don't adhere to one piece of advice I've been given, to concentrate on the ways that boys and girls interact at that age; although the three-person team of friends at the center of our tales is co-ed, they essentially all act the same, and eschew relationships with other children mostly to instead interrogate adults regarding the latest mystery they're trying to solve.) In fact, I was surprised by just how old-fashioned and even fuddy-duddy these stories sometimes are, given their immense popularity, happy proof that you don't nearly need to know about all the latest children's fads in order to write books that will appeal to them; they take place in a small middle-class pedestrian-oriented "Leave It To Beaver"esque town where even cellphones barely exist, and except for a few references to the internet could easily be mistaken for the chapter books from the 1950s and '60s that I grew up on.

As is typical for this age group, the "mystery" behind each story is pretty easily solvable, and is used mostly as an excuse to teach the rational problem-solving process of observation, interviews, and logical deduction; and as is typical of many authors for this age group, Roy often uses these stories to emphasize non-controversial moral lessons (i.e. "Lying is bad"), and also I think does an admirable job at adding as much diversity as possible to his admittedly white-bread environment. Each book is around 10,000 words altogether, broken into a dozen or so chapters, and contains dozens of illustrations* by John Steven Gurney.

*And P.S., not that this matters, but there was an aspect of these books that re-awakened an old complaint of mine from when I was in grade school and actually reading such books myself -- namely, the fact that the covers are done in a lush, full-color, photorealistic style, while the interior illustrations are monotonally cartoonish to the level of a typical newspaper comic strip, something I always considered a "bait & switch" scam when I was an actual kid. Although I could care less as a grown-up (and indeed, as a grown-up now understand why such a thing is done in the first place), I found it funny that these books could make a long-forgotten thirty-year-old memory re-emerge like that so profoundly. ( )
  jasonpettus | Jan 31, 2010 |
I liked it because it was about a mystery about gold. I like gold. ( )
  skeeterbo | Jul 28, 2008 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Ron Royautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Gurney, John StevenIlustradorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Dink, Josh, and Ruth Rose help catch the thieves who have stolen gold from Sammi's parents, the king and queen of Costra.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.17)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5
4 6
4.5
5 6

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,741,964 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível