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The Night Strangers: A Novel por Chris…
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The Night Strangers: A Novel (original 2011; edição 2011)

por Chris Bohjalian

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,00510515,759 (3.23)66
From the bestselling author of The Double Bind, Skeletons at the Feast, and Secrets of Eden, comes a riveting and dramatic ghost story. In a dusty corner of a basement in a rambling Victorian house in northern New Hampshire, a door has long been sealed shut with 39 six-inch-long carriage bolts. The home's new owners are Chip and Emily Linton and their twin ten-year-old daughters. Together they hope to rebuild their lives there after Chip, an airline pilot, had to ditch his 70-seat regional jet in Lake Champlain after double engine failure. Unlike the Miracle on the Hudson, however, most of the passengers aboard Flight 1611 died on impact or were drowned. The body count? Thirty-nine, a coincidence not lost on Chip when he discovers the number of bolts in that basement door. Meanwhile, Emily finds herself wondering about the women in this sparsely populated White Mountain village, self-proclaimed herbalists, and their interest in her fifth-grade daughters. Are the women mad? Or is it her husband, in the wake of the tragedy, whose grip on sanity has become desperately tenuous? The result is a powerful ghost story with a palpable sense of place, an unerring sense of the demons that drive us, and characters we care about deeply. The difference this time? Some of those characters are dead.… (mais)
Membro:EllenMeeropol
Título:The Night Strangers: A Novel
Autores:Chris Bohjalian
Informação:Crown (2011), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 400 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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The Night Strangers por Chris Bohjalian (2011)

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» Ver também 66 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 105 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Enjoyed it. Fairly creepy througout, including the epilogue. Well written, intelligent. Don't think it fully lived up to its positively electrifying prologue though; somehow the book added up to somewhat less than the sum of its parts. The character development was not overly thorough. Still, I don't want to give the impression I didn't enjoy the book - I did. It kept me interested throughout and it was a modestly satisfying Halloween read. I recommend reading that prologue if nothing else. ( )
  usuallee | Oct 7, 2021 |
I thought the ending fell a bit flat but mostly really enjoyed it. ( )
  Septima | Aug 21, 2021 |
i give this book 4 out of 5 stars based on the quality of the writing, the intriguing plot lines, characterization, and just generally, the high quality of the novel. Maybe I am impatient, but I took away one star due to what, to my taste, was unnecessary detail, slow pacing, and repetitive and unnecessary detours. Without giving away too much of the plot, I felt that the time spent on the story lines involving several non-coven members of the community was at best repetitive and at worst wasted as they were unnecessary to the story. We also were given too much detail on what every character was thinking when we really could figure that out based on their actions.

Now I am starting to sound like I didn't like the book. But I really did. It reminded me of Rosemary's Baby and that is a good thing. I would have just liked the RPM's revved up a bit more. ( )
  ChrisMcCaffrey | Apr 6, 2021 |
After completing this novel, I believe that Bohjalian was impressed by the Ira Levin works "Rosemary's Baby" and "The Stepford Wives" and he set out to write a similar unsettling novel as an homage. It doesn't work. Levin's writing is so subtly simple and sinister; no overwriting, no over-thinking involved; the story just flows out in a believable fashion. An admirable and for novelists, an enviable art. Obviously imitation is not easy.

None of the characters in this story captured my imagination in any way; they had all the depth and strength of the paper their tale was printed on. Even the brooding Victorian house where most of the action was set was a poor imitation of a haunted house. Compare that to Ira Levin's treatment of the Bramford; while not technically haunted, the Bramford provided an atmosphere of oppression and dread that was palpable.

As for the town of Bethel........I never had an uneasy feeling that the people of the town were up to no good or were threatening in any way. I mean, it was obvious from the start that this was the case; the problem is that the author did not create villains who were truly threatening or protagonists who were smart/tough enough to make the reader worry about their well-being or have any confidence that they were resourceful enough to triumph in the situation. The good ladies of Cornwall Coombe and the fine Scottish pagans who inhabit Summerisle don't need to worry about any creepy competition from this group of "herbalists".......not much in Bethel to really fear. To me the premise that the Linton family fell so easily under their influence and control was ridiculous; they just seem like consummate dipshits.

The many thousands of words devoted solely to the subject of Chip Linton's plane crash and his resulting PTSD were absolutely stultifying. It didn't take long before I started skimming over all the repetitive tripe about it.

This one was a real eye-roller. Also.......



Pet Lovers Warning: A character called Anise is a strict vegan......but she has no problem killing a household pet. This book was most unsatisfying in that regard; there was no comeuppance for act of cruelty. In my own mind I re-wrote the ending, making her die the slow, horribly painful and humiliating death which she so richly deserved. ( )
  Equestrienne | Jan 5, 2021 |
After a horrific plane crash, a pilot and his family move to rural New Hampshire to get away from it all. There, the first set of people they meet are exceptionally friendly herbalists who take an uncanny interest in the family's twin daughters. Occasional hints are dropped by others that this group is not to be trusted. Meanwhile, the pilot -- with nothing but time to ruminate -- begins to be haunted by those who died on his fatal flight. Is it all in his head or are there real ghosts in their strange new home?

On the whole, I've enjoyed books by Chris Bohjalian in the past so I picked this one up without really looking at it much beyond the author's name. This book is a little bit different than the others I've read by him, as it is has a bit of supernatural twist compared to his more realistic novels that I had previously read. That's not necessarily a deal breaker for me, as I like things that have a smidge of the supernatural. In fact, this book seemed to me like it could be an episode of one of my favorite shows, The X-Files. Actually, it seemed like it could be at least two episodes of that show and therein lies my problem with this book.

There was just SO much going on in this book. The PTSD from the plane crash combined with a man who is either being literally haunted or metaphorically haunted is a great idea. It's a bit reminiscent of The Shining but with enough of its own details to not feel like a ripoff. The second-person point-of-view narration works really well here and the story is unsettling but intriguing. This could be a great novel right here.

Then there's the other story of the herbalists with maybe murderous intentions. Again, there's a bit of cat-and-mouse in terms of what's really going on, although I felt like the story revealed itself very early on and then just followed through on that. Considering that Bohjalian often has remarkable twists at the end of his stories, I expected there might be more going on here than meets the eye, but it was pretty much what you were lead to believe by being privy to the thoughts of the herbalists alongside the thoughts of the family. This *maybe* could have been done better if we only seen the family's perspective and were kept just as in the dark as they were.

Finally, there's a third supernatural element with a character who claims to be a shaman who can read people's minds and exorcise ghosts. This I feel is where things really 'jumped the shark.' Having yet another supernatural aspect to this story felt like overkill and the mind-reading in particular was an unnecessary add-on.

That all being said, Bohjalian continues to be talented in his writing style in terms of word choice, dialogue, etc. and he builds a world with many perspectives. He clearly did a lot of research, as he describes a little bit in the author interview at the end of the audiobook version. The narrators for the audiobook both did a good job, with Mark Bramhall being particularly compelling. Still, it's clearly not my favorite book by this author and not the first one I would recommend to others. ( )
  sweetiegherkin | Sep 5, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 105 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
KIRKUS REVIEW

Bohjalian’s (Secrets of Eden, 2010, etc.) latest effort finds its dark magick in a coven of herbalists, ghosts from an air crash and the troubled history of a derelict Victorian house.

Chip Linton was an experienced pilot for a regional airline, but the aircraft he was flying one sunny August day hit a flock of geese upon takeoff. Chip’s chance to duplicate the heroic flying skills of Sully Sullenberger and the miracle landing on the Hudson River are lost to a rogue wave in the middle of Lake Champlain. Thirty-nine people died during the emergency landing. Until that day, Chip’s life had been the American dream: a profession he loved; a beautiful wife with a successful law practice; adored 10-year-old twin daughters. Now Chip fights posttraumatic stress and has crashed into clinical depression. Emily Linton decides the family needs a new start. She persuades Chip to move to the White Mountains of New Hampshire where she’s found a gingerbread-trimmed house crying for restoration. Emily joins a local law firm. The twins, Hallie and Garnet, try to fit in at school. And Chip goes to work remodeling the house, right down to obsessing over a door in the basement sealed by 39 carriage bolts. Chip, haunted by victims of the crash, wonders if the bolts are macabre symbols for the 39 dead. Like the Lintons, numerous houses around the small town have greenhouses, each owned and lovingly maintained by one of the herbalists. And the herbalists are especially interested in the Lintons’ twin daughters. The narrative develops an aura of malevolence early on, but perhaps too slowly for some horror fans. Many characters, especially all but one of the herbalists, seem one-dimensional. Some plot points are unresolved or take odd turns, perhaps in anticipation of a sequel. Chip’s story is the most compelling. It's presented in the second person and closely parallels the fugue state that sometimes haunts those with depression.

A practical magick horror story with a not-entirely-satisfying resolution.
adicionada por kthomp25 | editarKirkus
 

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Our bodies are gardens, to which our wills are gardeners.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Othello
Dead . . . might not be quiet at all.

MARSHA NORMAN, 'night, Mother
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From the bestselling author of The Double Bind, Skeletons at the Feast, and Secrets of Eden, comes a riveting and dramatic ghost story. In a dusty corner of a basement in a rambling Victorian house in northern New Hampshire, a door has long been sealed shut with 39 six-inch-long carriage bolts. The home's new owners are Chip and Emily Linton and their twin ten-year-old daughters. Together they hope to rebuild their lives there after Chip, an airline pilot, had to ditch his 70-seat regional jet in Lake Champlain after double engine failure. Unlike the Miracle on the Hudson, however, most of the passengers aboard Flight 1611 died on impact or were drowned. The body count? Thirty-nine, a coincidence not lost on Chip when he discovers the number of bolts in that basement door. Meanwhile, Emily finds herself wondering about the women in this sparsely populated White Mountain village, self-proclaimed herbalists, and their interest in her fifth-grade daughters. Are the women mad? Or is it her husband, in the wake of the tragedy, whose grip on sanity has become desperately tenuous? The result is a powerful ghost story with a palpable sense of place, an unerring sense of the demons that drive us, and characters we care about deeply. The difference this time? Some of those characters are dead.

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