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The Devil All the Time por Donald Ray…
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The Devil All the Time (original 2011; edição 2011)

por Donald Ray Pollock (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0435114,481 (3.97)64
"Set in rural southern Ohio and West Virginia, The Devil All the Time follows a cast of compelling and bizarre characters from the end of World War II to the 1960s. There's Willard Russell, tormented veteran of the carnage in the South Pacific, who can't save his beautiful wife, Charlotte, from an agonizing death by cancer no matter how much sacrificial blood he pours on his prayer log. There's Carl and Sandy Henderson, a husband-and-wife team of serial killers, who troll America's highways searching for suitable models to photograph and exterminate. There's the spider-handling preacher Roy and his crippled virtuoso-guitar-playing sidekick, Theodore, running from the law. And caught in the middle of all this is Arvin Eugene Russell, Willard and Charlotte's orphaned son, who grows up to be a good but also violent man in his own right"--Jacket.… (mais)
Membro:wayfaring_stranger
Título:The Devil All the Time
Autores:Donald Ray Pollock (Autor)
Informação:Doubleday (2011), Edition: First Edition first Printing, 272 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:to-read

Pormenores da obra

The Devil All the Time por Donald Ray Pollock (2011)

  1. 10
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    sparemethecensor: Though one is set in Appalachia and one in the Ozarks, both are dark, gritty, Southern noir novels that immerse readers fully in the depravity that comes along with desperate poverty in these regions of the country.
  2. 10
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  3. 00
    The Avenue of the Giants por Marc Dugain (olyvia)
  4. 00
    Tomato Red por Daniel Woodrell (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Another Noirish crime novel set in Appalachia.
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Um, I saw the trailer for this book and it looks absolutely AMAZING and up my alley - this was TOO much animal stuff, too much religion ... felt very Stephen King rambly to me - not that it's a bad thing - it just really wasn't for me in the end, but I still intend to watch the movie because it does honestly look spectacular lol ( )
  ashezbookz | Oct 20, 2020 |
This is a review solely on the book, not the movie. This is a rant review from my blog, so bear with me. Warning: Not only is this a full spoiler review, but I will be discussing the difficult topics the book covers, some of which could be triggering.


I finished The Devil All the Time two days ago, just in time for the film's release. While I am excited to watch the movie, especially with all the big names attached, I’m more interested to see if the movie can rectify some of the major issues I had with the novel. So welcome to my first rant review!


I am not from the American South, which I’m pretty sure affected the way I interacted with the characters and landscape. I’ve never been to Ohio or West Virginia, and I can’t say that the novel gave me a great view or idea of what the states are like. Then again, maybe it’s because I’m not a white dude.


I haven’t read many books in my life that disgust me. Typically, I can read bloody books full of gore, and read novels that explore the minds of terrible people, without too much issue. I’ve always felt that literature is a chance to explore difficult subjects and look at how these issues pertain to our current world, or are possible in the future. That being said, I think that the way The Devil All the Time dealt with such subjects, with such a pessimistic view, made it difficult to read.


I think what truly made me uncomfortable reading The Devil All the Time was the author’s casual use of violence against women, homophobic and stereotypical treatment of the LGBT community, racist slurs, troubling portray of the disabled community, and pedophilia.


The Devil All the Time follows a large cast of characters over the course of two decades. The novel begins with Willard, a troubled young man arriving home after the end of the second world war. He eventually settles down, marrying a young woman named Charlotte and having a son, Arvin. When Charlotte contracts cancer, Willard slaughters animals, and eventually a man, as sacrifices. Charlotte dies and Willard commits suicide the same day. Arvin, now around 10, is sent to live with his grandmother, Emma. Arvin isn’t the only orphan Emma has taken in. Lenora has been living with Emma since she was a baby, when her travelling preacher/drifter father, Roy, and his cousin, Theodore, killed her mother (though she doesn’t know this.)


Eight years later, Arvin is still recovering from everything he lived through in his childhood. Lenora is bullied for her plainness and dedication to God. A new preacher comes to town, a pedophile, and begins to abuse young girls, including Lenora. Lenora commits suicide (accidentally, known to no one but the reader,) after she gets pregnant. Arvin figures out what happened, and follows in his father’s murderous footsteps by killing the corrupt preacher.


After leaving Emma and heading back to his hometown, he is picked up by Sandy and Carl. Sandy helps her husband to seduce hitchhikers, exclusively young men, then kill them. The two previously killed Roy as he was on his way back to see Lenora after the death of Theodore. Arvin catches on to what they want to do and kills them. When he arrives back to his hometown, he is hunted down by Lee Bodecker, Sandy’s older brother. Arvin kills Brodecker in the same circle his father killed himself. At the end of the novel, Arvin is one of the few still living characters.


If you find this summary confusing to follow, that’s because A LOT happens in the book. I’ll give Pollock credit for the intricacies of how all the characters interact, but the large cast had me flipping back pages to see which characters were which.


Now, time to talk about the women of The Devil all the Time. All of them were heartbreaking to read and made it difficult for me to finish the book. None of them felt like real women, and few had more than the occasional couple lines. Their worth is attributed to their appearance. Take how Arvin talks about his half-sister, whom he has lived with now for more than half a decade:


Though just a few months younger than Arvin, she already seemed dried up, a pale winter spud left too long in the furrow. [...] “She ain’t never gonna make cheerleader, that’s for sure,” he [Arvin] told Uncle Earskell. (p. 111, ebook)


When I was thinking back over the ways the women died in this novel, I realized most of them die in a way that is often referred to as ‘fridging.’ The phrase is used to describe women who die to propel the character arcs of the main, male characters.


Perhaps worst of all, most of the women endure incredibly horrible, repeated acts of grooming and sexual assault. The case that made me want to throw my e-reader at the wall was that of Lenora. The young teenager is targeted by the new preacher because her looks and bullying make her “easy.” He grooms her over the course of several months, and continually rapes her. Lenora’s point of view and her trauma is barely explored, instead replaced by the pastor talking about how she is filling out and is more beautiful than before. After she gets pregnant and is gas-lighted by the pastor, Lenora dies. The entire situation felt like it was described and dealt with in the worst way possible. Lenora’s sexual assault is used to propel Arvin’s character arcs and that of the preacher, whereas Lenora has a very small arc and we learn little about her. Using violence against women for this purpose is disgusting, there’s no other way to put it,


I’m not going to get into detail as much with the other issues, because I think they pretty much speak for themselves. The n-word is said by two (minor) characters to show how racist they are, while the one (also minor) black character ends up in jail for a crime he didn’t commit. The two ‘gay’ characters. (it’s not official but HEAVILY implied,) further perpetuate harmful stereotypes against the LGBT community. One is a pedophile: “Theodore swore that the boy asked for help in zipping his pants up, but not even Roy could buy that one.” (p. 137, ebook). The other, Carl, kills young men after he takes their picture.


The prose that describes all of these events is stark and in the third person. Even though I had a view inside of the character’s head, I never felt like I understood them or their emotions. All felt very surface level, and in-your- face evil. The setting is also not obvious or clear to someone like me who has never visited the area. I found it uninspiring to read and at times unclear as to how a scene was being played out. The novel does deliver its promise of evil and pessimism, with despicable characters and a bleak setting, but I don’t think any of it had the effect Pollock likely anticipated. I left The Devil All the Time feeling empty. I didn’t feel like I better understood the Southern Gothic, nor did I feel like I had watched characters delve into darkness in an eerily real-to-life way. Honestly, I regretted reading this book.


The only reason I finished this book was because I wanted to watch the movie. One of the things that worries me is that there are going to be young girls who watch the movie and idolize the very bad characters just because they’re played by their ‘favs’ and ‘idols’. I was excited to watch the movie and read the book after I first watched the trailer, but I am far from saying the same thing now.


Rating 2/10: I didn’t have a good time reading this novel for many reasons that you now know. I highly DON’T recommend The Devil All the Time. ( )
  Reading.rock | Oct 17, 2020 |
This book is so good. The characters are written so well, but they're all sad, dysfunctional, or just really bad people. More accurately: they're a combination of those three things. Among them, there is a husband-wife duo that ride around collecting hitchhiking men to photograph, a corrupt law enforcement officer, and a collection of really nasty preachers. My favorite character is Arvin Russell, a young man who is orphaned early and sent away to live with relatives. Arvin has a traumatic coming-of-age, with a dying mother and a father that creates a place to "pray" for her in the woods. It's so dark and twisted and depraved.

This group of people is just, wow. It isn't their individual stories that make this novel so excellent; it's the way the author weaves their lives together. Their paths cross in ways that make the entire story exceptional, far better than the sum of its parts. You sort of have to wait for the big payoff, to see how everything will ultimately come together. But it's so worth it.

I cannnot wait to see the Netflix adaptation of this book in a couple of weeks. I have it on my calendar, actually.

Audiobook Notes: I saw that the audiobook is narrated by Mark Bramhall, one of my favorite narrators, so I listened to the entire thing. My gosh, Bramhall's narration is excellent. He does some of the best accents out there, and he made these characters come alive alongside (and inside of) their rough, poor, Appalachian environment. I fully recommend audiobook as the preferred format for reading this story. It is exceptional.

Title: The Devil All The Time by Donald Ray Pollock
Narrator: Mark Bramhall
Length: 9 hours, 10 minutes, Unabridged
Publisher: Random House Audio ( )
  Asheley | Sep 2, 2020 |
Disclaimer: I was given a free copy of this book in return for an honest review.

This is dark. Very dark. Like, unremittingly dark. Like, the author has to literally compare it to the constant presence of Satan in your life in the actual title dark. But it's also very enjoyable.

And that's because there's a thick seem of pitch-black satire running right through the story. The endless string of violence, abuse and perversion is presented as the product of small-town inadequacies in the middle of America in the middle of the twentieth century. And in small towns, there is a lot of inadequacy.

At times, the colliding violent stories reminded me of the films of Quentin Tarantino – and that'll be because they both draw on a mixture of American history, myth and hardboiled crime fiction. Fans of True Detective or Stephen King will also enjoy its flirtations with folk horror; violence is closely linked to religion or the sublime throughout, reminding you of just what a gory religion Christianity can be in the Bible Belt. (I read Children of the Corn partway through this and was struck by the parallels.)

I don't think you could believe in Heaven and write a book like this. I don't, and I bloody loved it. ( )
  m_k_m | Aug 31, 2020 |
This is not a novel that I would recommend to everyone. That is not because this is a bad novel, for it is indeed a very good one; rather I hesitate in my recommendation because there are no truly good characters in this book, in fact the are several very bad ones. The best you can say about the central protagonist, Arvin Russell, is that his violent tendencies are reserved for some of the worst of the lot.

So what is there to recommend about this novel? The author has captured realistically a slice of America's underside and portrayed it very well with strong characterizations and a believable, if not somewhat improbable and very violent, plot.

Set in Ohio and West Virginia in the years following World War II, it tells the stories of various desperate characters, including a veteran suffering from PTSD, a pair of husband-and-wife serial killers, and both a preacher and sheriff who are corrupt.

The protagonist, Arvin, is presented in a prologue as a young boy. He sits in a clearing with his father, Willard, on an oak log, joining him in his evening prayer routine. Willard is borderline obsessive when it comes to prayer and expects the same from his son. While Arvin prays, however, his mind wanders and feelings of isolation bubble to the surface. He feels like an outsider at school, he is the victim of relentless bullying. Arvin recalls his father telling him to stand up for himself, but this is easier said than done.

Willard recalls the horrifying things he saw and did during the war. One memory haunts him in particular: that of a soldier he comes across who has been skinned and crucified. Willard shoots the man as an act of mercy, putting an end to his suffering. Upon his return home he had married a young woman named Charlotte Willoughby and together they have a son whom they name Arvin. As the years pass, Willard becomes obsessed with prayer. The obsession only deepens when Charlotte contracts cancer. Willard’s rituals become progressively more bizarre and upsetting, culminating in animal and even human sacrifice. Willard believes these acts of devotion are necessary to save his wife. Nevertheless, in the end, Charlotte still dies, prompting Willard to commit suicide. Traumatized by his parents’ deaths and his father’s behavior, Arvin moves in with his grandmother, Emma. There, he meets Lenora, an orphan girl whom Emma takes in after her mother, Helen, is killed, most likely by a traveling preacher named Roy who is also Lenora’s father.

The narrator moves on to tell of Carl and Sandy Henderson, a pair of murderous lowlifes who entertain themselves by picking up male hitchhikers and killing them. Their reign of terror is allowed to persist in part because Sandy’s brother, Sheriff Bodecker, is corrupt and incompetent. An unemployed photographer, Carl takes pictures of his victims, calling them models.
In the meantime Arvin and Lenora grow up and become very close. When Lenora is bullied at school, Arvin comes to her defense, fighting the bullies, but also demonstrating a violent side that will follow him throughout his life. In addition to further exploits of Carl and Sandy's we are told more about Roy, the traveling preacher who killed Lenora’s mother. Roy lives with his physically disabled cousin, Theodore. After moving on from the Coal Creek Church of the Holy Ghost Sanctified, Roy is replaced by a new preacher, Pastor Teagardin, who lives with his much younger wife, Cynthia. Lenora believes Teagardin to be an exceptionally holy man, but Arvin has his doubts. These suspicions are validated when the reader learns of Teagardin’s seduction and sexual corruption of Cynthia. Teagardin then successfully seduces Lenora, getting the young girl pregnant. Furious, Arvin shoots Teagardin dead and flees Coal Creek.

These dreary yet interesting plot lines come together in the last part of the book. While there is no hero magically appearing on a white horse each of the characters reach an end that is fitting, considering the lives they have lived. Throughout the novel the author builds the suspense so that you are propelled forward in spite of the violence. That aspect, the realism of the story, and the insight into the demented psychology of each of the characters made this a very good novel which I would recommend, especially to fans of Cormac McCarthy or Flannery O'Connor. ( )
  jwhenderson | Jul 5, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 51 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The characters are bound to intersect. Sheriff, sisters, preachers, killers, Arvin: who will collide and how gives the book a real page-turning tension. But where any prime-time television show can incite nail-biting with a lurking killer, Pollock has done much more. He’s layered decades of history, shown the inner thoughts of a collage of characters, and we understand how deeply violence and misfortune have settled into the bones of this place. The question is much more than whether someone will die — it is, can the cycle of bloodletting break? This applies both to the people Pollock so skillfully enlivens as it does to the place he’s taken as his literary heritage.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarLos Angeles Times, Carolyn Kellogg (sítio Web pago) (Aug 14, 2011)
 
Pollock’s prose is as sickly beautiful as it is hard-boiled. His scenes have a rare and unsettling ability to make the reader woozy, the ends of the chapters flicking like black horseflies off the page. Pollock knows how to dunk readers into a scene and when to pull them out gasping, and the muscular current of each plot line exerts a continuous pull toward the engulfing falls. Important as well, and welcome, is the native intelligence he grants each of his characters. While many of them may be backwoods, none are backwards; and almost all are rich with a fatalistic humor that is often their sole redeeming feature.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarThe New York Times, Josh Ritter (sítio Web pago) (Aug 12, 2011)
 
If Pollock's powerful collection Knockemstiff was a punch to the jaw, his follow-up, a novel set in the violent soul-numbing towns of southern Ohio and West Virginia, feels closer to a mule's kick, and how he draws these folks and their inevitably hopeless lives without pity is what the kick's all about.
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarPublishers Weekly (May 2, 2011)
 
Tras el sensacional éxito de Knockemstiff, he aquí la esperadísima primera incursión en la novela de Donald Ray Pollock: El diablo a todas horas mezcla la imaginería del gótico norteamericano con la sequedad y crudeza de la novela negra más descarnada en una trama adictiva y contundente, que replica y expande la intensidad de sus mejores relatos. Todo un despliegue de poder narrativo, y la reválida de una firma imprescindible.

Cuando Willard Russell, veterano de la primera guerra mundial, descubre que el cáncer empuja a su mujer hacia una muerte inevitable, concluye que solo Jesús podrá socorrer a quien la ciencia ha condenado; tras erigir un altar en pleno bosque, se entrega a unas sesiones de oración que, poco a poco, se tornarán peligrosamente sangrientas, y en las que participará, estoico, su hijo Arvin. Durante más de dos décadas, desde la resaca posbélica hasta los aparentemente esperanzados años sesenta, Arvin crece en busca de su propia versión de la justicia, rodeado de personajes tan particulares como siniestros: Carl y Sandy Henderson, una pareja de asesinos en serie que patrullan América en una extraña misión homicida; el fugitivo Roy, predicador circense y febril, y su compañero Theodore, guitarrista paralítico y asediado por sus pulsiones; el religioso Preston Teagardin, cruel, sádico y lascivo, y el sheriff corrupto Lee Bodecker, que está dejando de beber. Hombres y mujeres frecuentemente dominados por formas monstruosas de la fe, que perdieron el rumbo en un mundo a la deriva donde Dios no es más que una sombra.
adicionada por Pakoniet | editarLecturalia
 

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On a dismal morning near the end of a wet October, Arvin Eugene Russell hurried behind his father, Willard, along the edge of a pasture that overlooked a long and rocky holler in southern Ohio called Knockemstiff. -Prologue
It was Wednesday afternoon in the fall of 1945, not long after the war had ended. -Chapter 1
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"Set in rural southern Ohio and West Virginia, The Devil All the Time follows a cast of compelling and bizarre characters from the end of World War II to the 1960s. There's Willard Russell, tormented veteran of the carnage in the South Pacific, who can't save his beautiful wife, Charlotte, from an agonizing death by cancer no matter how much sacrificial blood he pours on his prayer log. There's Carl and Sandy Henderson, a husband-and-wife team of serial killers, who troll America's highways searching for suitable models to photograph and exterminate. There's the spider-handling preacher Roy and his crippled virtuoso-guitar-playing sidekick, Theodore, running from the law. And caught in the middle of all this is Arvin Eugene Russell, Willard and Charlotte's orphaned son, who grows up to be a good but also violent man in his own right"--Jacket.

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