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Troy (Two-Disc Full Screen Edition) por Brad…
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Troy (Two-Disc Full Screen Edition) (edição 2005)

por Brad Pitt (Actor)

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456440,677 (3.47)1 / 1
In 1193 B.C., Prince Paris, the son of the King of Troy falls in love with Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, and convinces her to follow him away from her husband, Menelaus, the result is an epic war. The Greeks sail to Troy and lay siege. Achilles, the greatest warrior in all the world, is called in to fight against Troy and give Greece the upper hand. Hector, the eldest son of Priam, King of Troy, and the greatest Trojan warrior embodies the hopes of the people of his city.… (mais)
Membro:Melissa1019
Título:Troy (Two-Disc Full Screen Edition)
Autores:Brad Pitt (Actor)
Informação:Warner Home Video (2005)
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Troy [2004 film] por Wolfgang Petersen (Director)

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Troja [Troy] (2004)

Brad Pitt – Achilles
Eric Bana – Hector
Orlando Bloom – Paris
Peter O’Toole – Priam
Brian Cox – Agamemnon
Sean Bean – Odysseus
Diane Kruger – Helen
Rose Byrne – Briseis
Saffron Burrows – Andromache
Julie Christie – Thetis

Screenplay by David Benioff
Directed by Wolfgang Petersen

Warner Home Video Germany, 2007. 2-Disc Special Edition. Director's Cut. 196 min. 2.35:1. Dolby Digital 5.1.

======================================

I am part of the infinitesimal minority that prefers this epic to Homer’s. The reason is simple. Troy is a huge improvement over The Iliad. The opening credits rightly state “inspired by”. That’s correct. The filmmakers were inspired to create something greater. Ironically enough, the movie has been panned precisely because it changes the “original” so much. This is sheer prejudice born out of herd mentality. Because The Iliad is very old, very long and very hard to read, it has been drilled into the heads of mindless “booklovers” that its greatness is untouchable. Well, it is not.

The number of improvements in the movie is enormous. The gods are completely removed, and thank God for that. Nobody needs their inane intrigues that only serve to make the mortals ridiculous. The characters are beautifully developed from Homer’s bare outlines. Achilles and Hector are both refreshingly irreverent, heroic and human (not merely capricious), their battle is one of the greatest ever (not the lame farce from the poem), and the role of Briseis is expanded (with momentous consequences for Achilles). Paris and Helen don’t need Venus to be star-crossed lovers, but their story, though a trifle mushy, is still superior to Homer’s perfunctory treatment. The same goes for the relationships of the Trojan brothers with their father and with each other. Agamemnon’s greed, vanity and passion for self-aggrandizement are just as memorable in ten times smaller space, as are the wit and charm of Odysseus. And, of course, the Trojan Horse, the sack of Troy and the deaths of Achilles and Agamemnon, all omitted in The Iliad, are given here in full. The few scenes taken directly from Homer (e.g. Priam and Achilles about Hector’s body) are heavily abridged with no loss of power or depth. The extravagant rhetoric of the Greek bard is exchanged for the equally effective – and much more subtle – speech of intelligent people trying to cope with their predicaments. In short, the script humanizes Homer’s bland characters by making them more complex and more accessible, but without losing the epic scale of the conflict.

The movie does have a few drawbacks, but they are entirely obliterated by its merits. Some of the dialogue, for example, is positively cringe-worthy. When Achilles says to his Myrmidons that they are lions and there is immortality waiting for them on the Trojan shores, the effect is unintentionally hilarious. When Priam tells Paris that fighting for love makes more sense than fighting for land, power and glory, he is only talking sentimental nonsense. Not even Brad Pitt and Peter O’Toole can make such moments convincing. On the other hand, the dialogue is for the most part intensely dramatic and it does have its fair share of thought-provoking, even profound, lines. These range from the epigrams of Odysseus to the philosophical musings of Achilles. For example:

Odysseus: You have your swords. I have my tricks. We play with the toys the gods give us.

Odysseus: Sometimes you need to serve in order to lead. I hope you understand that one day.

Odysseus [to Achilles]: You don’t fear anybody. That’s your problem.

Odysseus: War is young men dying and old men talking.

Odysseus: Men are haunted by the vastness of eternity.

Odysseus: Women have a way of complicating things.

Achilles: We men are wretched things.

Achilles [to Briseis]: I'll tell you a secret. Something they don't teach you in the temple. The gods envy us. They envy us because we're mortal, because any moment might be our last. Everything is more beautiful because we're doomed. You will never be lovelier than you are now. We will never be here again.

Briseis: What do you want here in Troy? You didn't come for the Spartan queen.
Achilles: What all men want. I just want it more.

Briseis: Why did you choose this life?
Achilles: What life?
Briseis: To be a great warrior.
Achilles: I chose nothing. I was born and this is what I am.

The only other defect worth mentioning is that the Director’s Cut is gratuitously gory. Ironically enough, this makes it closer to The Iliad. But make no mistake! People may be stabbed and speared amidst lots of pancake syrup here, but this is nothing compared to Homer’s sick relish of such scenes. Despite this unfortunate detail, the Director’s Cut is the one to have. In addition to more blood and gore, it also contains a good deal of new material, even a few whole scenes (e.g. Helen and Paris after his fight with Menelaus), that is well worth having. It makes the characters and their relationships even more complex and compelling. The differences between the two versions are nicely summarized on IMDb.

The acting uniformly ranges from very good to excellent. In the very few cases when it seems inadequate, this is rather a function of the weak script. Brian Cox is the standout. It’s a shame that such a great actor is often relegated to small parts. But this is not the case here, and he delivers unforgettable, consumed with hate for Achilles and love for glory, Agamemnon. Sean Bean is almost as fine an Odysseus, a sly smile usually hovering on his face. Brad Pitt and Eric Bana are excellent in conveying both the heroic similarities and the familial differences of their characters. Brendan Gleeson is often underrated, but if you take the trouble to look more carefully into his performances, you might find a remarkably versatile actor; his Menelaus is coarse, bluff and totally convincing. No actor has ever received greater acclaim for smaller talent than Orlando Bloom, but he is perfectly cast as the cowardly Paris. Peter O’Toole adds a touch of old-school class to an altogether excellent male cast. The women are far less prominent, but I have nothing to complain about Diane Kruger, Rose Byrne or Saffron Burrows. Julie Christie’s cameo as Achilles’ mother is fun – and another scene vastly superior to Homer’s cheap fantasy.

This film has been criticised far too much for all the wrong reasons. Truth is, it doesn’t matter how much of Homer’s “original” is preserved. I happen to think that the three hours watching Troy is a time much better spent than the three hundred hours reading The Iliad, but this is not the reason why I have seen the movie several times already. It is worth seeing because it is a very human story, a story about fathers, brothers, wives and lovers, a story of passion, war, vanity, power, greed and glory, a story which is stylishly written, beautifully acted and perceptively directed. ( )
1 vote Waldstein | Jan 9, 2016 |
En el año 1193 a. C., Paris, hijo de Príamo y príncipe de Troya, rapta a Helena, esposa de Menelao, el rey de Esparta, lo que desencadena la Guerra De Troya, en la que se enfrentan griegos y troyanos. El ejército griego asedió la ciudad de Troya durante más de diez años. Aquiles era el gran héroe de los griegos, mientras Héctor, el hijo mayor de Príamo, el rey de Troya, representaba la única esperanza de salvación para la ciudad.
  bibliest | Dec 15, 2015 |
Brad Pitt (Actor), Eric Bana (Actor), Wolfgang Petersen (Director)
Brad Pitt picks up a sword and brings a muscular, brooding presence to the role of Greek warrior Achilles in this spectacular retelling of The Iliad. Orlando Bloom and Diane Kruger play the legendary lovers who plunge the world into war, Eric Bana portrays the prince who dares to confront Achilles, and Peter O'Toole rules Troy as King Priam. Director Wolfgang Petersen recreates a long-ago world of bireme warships, clashing armies, the massive fortress city and the towering Trojan Horse.
  OasisJax_GLBT_Center | Jun 19, 2011 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (15 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Petersen, WolfgangDirectorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Benioff, DavidScreenwriterautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
HomerPoemautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bana, EricActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bean, SeanActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Bloom, OrlandoActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Burrows, SaffronActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Byrne, RoseActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Christie, JulieActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cosmo, JamesActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Cox, BrianActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Gleeson, BrendanActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hedlund, GarrettActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Kruger, DianeActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
O’Toole, PeterActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Pitt, BradActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Pratt, RogerDirector of Photographyautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Regan, VincentActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Terry, NigelActorautor secundáriotodas as ediçõesconfirmado
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In 1193 B.C., Prince Paris, the son of the King of Troy falls in love with Helen, the wife of the king of Sparta, and convinces her to follow him away from her husband, Menelaus, the result is an epic war. The Greeks sail to Troy and lay siege. Achilles, the greatest warrior in all the world, is called in to fight against Troy and give Greece the upper hand. Hector, the eldest son of Priam, King of Troy, and the greatest Trojan warrior embodies the hopes of the people of his city.

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