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Thinking, Fast and Slow por Daniel Kahneman
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Thinking, Fast and Slow (original 2011; edição 2013)

por Daniel Kahneman (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8,482186729 (4.13)162
In this work the author, a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, has brought together his many years of research and thinking in one book. He explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. He exposes the extraordinary capabilities, and also the faults and biases, of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. He reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives, and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. This author's work has transformed cognitive psychology and launched the new fields of behavioral economics and happiness studies. In this book, he takes us on a tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think and the way we make choices.… (mais)
Membro:jeffscollier
Título:Thinking, Fast and Slow
Autores:Daniel Kahneman (Autor)
Informação:Farrar, Straus and Giroux (2013), Edition: 1st, 499 pages
Colecções:Lidos mas não possuídos, Favoritos
Avaliação:****1/2
Etiquetas:critical-thinking

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Thinking, Fast and Slow por Daniel Kahneman (2011)

Adicionado recentemente porAtababa, biblioteca privada, Steven_Murray, shanlevco, ejmw, lespotiers, jbsavitz1, pd80pgd
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I finally read the book behind the System 1 / System 2 thinking idea. The research on this book was cited so many times in other books I read before this one so it was good to go to the source. Fascinating with lots of examples. ( )
  noisydeadlines | Jul 30, 2021 |
Great book. Changes the way you look at your decisions and your life. But not an easy book to read. ( )
  nitins | Jul 28, 2021 |
Kahneman's "Thinking, Fast and Slow" was interesting enough, discussing how our mind works, and the theories behind the mind's workings. If I hadn't just completed a very similar work, Dean Buonomano's "Brain Bugs: How the Brain's Flaws Shape Our Lives", I'm sure I would have liked this book much more. But, perhaps in part because I read "Brain Bugs" first, I found I preferred that book to "Thinking, Fast and Slow". Buonomano's book seemed to explain the workings of the brain in more understandable terms, and felt the information was presented in a much more interesting manner. The two books sometimes gave the same examples to clarify their points, so to me, if I had to recommend just one book on this subject, I'd point you to "Brain Bugs: How the Brain's Flaws Shape our Lives". ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
A Nobel economist pulls together decades of research in psychology for a big tome with a simple point. We have two brains, one impulsive and one analytical, but both always at work. Professor Kahneman dissects how we crave simplicity, familiarity, narrative, hunches, optimism and control. These things have helped us survive for millennia by allowing us to act without thinking. They still have us jumping to conclusions, but also making simple calculations more reliable than Big Data.
  rynk | Jul 11, 2021 |
Behavioral economics is "in" right now, partially as a result of the weakness of the economics profession in recent years, and partially because psychologists have stopped practicing Freudian incantations and started uncovering amazing details of how human beings actually think and behave. Kahneman's research into the division of consciousness between the fast-acting and unconscious System 1 and the more high-powered but lazy System 2 is recounted in this alternately fascinating and horrifying exploration of the unconscious. After reading this lengthy catalog of flaws, biases, and lacunae in our overworked brains, you'll be amazed that civilization exists at all, given the myriad ways that the snap judgments of System 1 get taken on faith by System 2. You'll also be disturbed that there doesn't seem to be an easy to way to fix the fragility of your everyday processes of judgment. Even the smartest person has the same ramshackle collections of neuron clusters as everyone else, and even this summary of the pioneering research that Kahneman and everyone else has done opens with the frank admission that he's susceptible to the same cognitive limits as everyone else. Knowing may be half the battle, but that still leaves a good bit for future study and action. ( )
1 vote aaronarnold | May 11, 2021 |
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The replication crisis in psychology does not extend to every line of inquiry, and just a portion of the work described in Thinking, Fast and Slow has been cast in shadows. Kahneman and Tversky’s own research, for example, turns out to be resilient. Large-scale efforts to recreate their classic findings have so far been successful. One bias they discovered—people’s tendency to overvalue the first piece of information that they get, in what is known as the “anchoring effect”—not only passed a replication test, but turned out to be much stronger than Kahneman and Tversky thought.

Still, entire chapters of Kahneman’s book may need to be rewritten.
adicionada por elenchus | editarSlate.com, Daniel Engber (Dec 1, 2016)
 
"It is an astonishingly rich book: lucid, profound, full of intellectual surprises and self-help value. It is consistently entertaining and frequently touching..."
adicionada por melmore | editarNew York Times, Jim Holt (Nov 25, 2011)
 
Thinking, Fast and Slow is nonetheless rife with lessons on how to overcome bias in daily life.
adicionada por mercure | editarBusinessweek, Roger Lowenstein (Oct 27, 2011)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (23 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Daniel Kahnemanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Egan, PatrickReaderautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Eivind LilleskjæretTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gunnar NyquistTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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Every author, I suppose, has in mind a setting in which readers of his or her work could benefit from having read it.
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extreme outcomes (both high and low) are more likely to be found in small than in large samples. This explanation is not causal. The small population of a county neither causes nor prevents cancer; it merely allows the incidence of cancer to be much higher (or much lower) than it is in the larger population. The deeper truth is that there is nothing to explain. The incidence of cancer is not truly lower or higher than normal in a county with a small population, it just appears to be so in a particular year because of an accident of sampling. If we repeat the analysis next year, we will observe the same general pattern of extreme results in the small samples, but the counties where cancer was common last year will not necessarily have a high incidence this year. If this is the case, the differences between dense and rural counties do not really count as facts: they are what scientists call artifacts, observations that are produced entirely by some aspect of the method of research - in this case, by differences in sample size. p 111
Even now, you must exert some mental effort to see that the following two statements mean exactly the same thing: Large samples are more precise than small samples. Small samples yield extreme results more often than large samples do. p 111
When experts and the public disagree on their priorities, [Paul Slovic] says, 'Each side must respect the insights and intelligence of the other.' p 140
You can also take precautions that will inoculate you against regret. Perhaps the most useful is to b explicit about the anticipation of regret. If you can remember when things go badly that you considered the possibility of regret carefully before deciding, you are likely to experience less of it. You should also know that regret and hindsight bias will come together, so anything you can do to preclude hindsight is likely to be helpful. My personal hindsight-avoiding policy is to be either very thorough or completely casual when making a decision with long-term consequences. Hindsight is worse when you think a little, just enough to tell yourself later, 'I almost made a better choice.'     Daniel Gilbert and his colleagues provocatively claim that people generally anticipate more regret than they will actually experience, because they underestimate the efficacy of the psychological defenses they will deploy - which they label the 'psychological immune system.' Their recommendation is that you should not put too much weight on regret; even if you have some, it will hurt less than you now think.p 352
Unless there is an obvious reason to do otherwise, most of us passively accept decision problems as they are framed and therefore rarely have an opportunity to discover the extent to which our preferences are frame-bound rather than reality-bound. p 367
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In this work the author, a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, has brought together his many years of research and thinking in one book. He explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. He exposes the extraordinary capabilities, and also the faults and biases, of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. He reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives, and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. This author's work has transformed cognitive psychology and launched the new fields of behavioral economics and happiness studies. In this book, he takes us on a tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think and the way we make choices.

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