Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

All My Sons (1947)

por Arthur Miller

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8862018,094 (3.84)27
A searing exposure of war profiteering and the awful price paid by self-interest and greed, 'All My Sons' represented Miller's first Broadway success in 1947.
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 27 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is a review of the LA Theatre Works radio play (Julie Harris 1998), which is a fantastic audio production originally broadcast on NPR. The play itself left me stunned in terms of how quickly things went from surface ideal to tragedy in a single day, at the speed of a plane crash, or factory assembly line, sometimes things go terribly wrong. Only missing is "Dramatic Squirrel" as revelations pile on. By the end you know what will happen before it does, a bit over the top juvenile. This was his first successful play, he was only 26 when he conceived it. The dialogue is awesome and leaves a lot to think about. Acting on your own behalf versus the greater good seems to be the main rift. ( )
  Stbalbach | Dec 5, 2020 |
What the hell are you? You're not even an animal, no animal kills his own, what are you? ( )
  SolangePark | Aug 24, 2020 |



Update: 22 Nov

I'm listening to an interview with David Suchet just before he goes on to the stage to do this play. He talks about how to keep fresh and eager and new for every performance of a long-running play. I imagine, he says, that there will be just one person, just one who has never been to the theatre before and I play to that person. He wants to give the most wonderful experience to that person.

Oh David. If you only knew. I sat there watching you in this play a few months ago and sitting next to me was a 12 year old boy who had never been to the theatre before. Nearby was his 14 year old sister. James was engrossed throughout. Lou loved it too. You couldn't have been more inspirational or given these two kids a better introduction to theatre.

I wish you knew what a great gift you bestowed upon them.

---------------------


I feel like I've had more of my fair share of a certain type of phone call, the one telling you somebody is dead. Twice over the last few years they've been a great shock, the closest of friends, one cooking, one vacuum cleaning, alive one moment, dead minutes later.

But today I've had the All My Sons experience and I can see already how it is worse. The police rang up earlier, enquiring after a missing person, when had I last talked to him. On Saturday evening, I said, a flurry of smses. They knew that, actually, because they had his mobile phone and that is how they contacted me.

The other person in his house had filed a missing persons report today. I'm guessing the same person he had a big fight with on Saturday evening. He told me he was going out to behave badly...aka get drunk, get laid was my interpretion. I begged him to come over, straight away, 4am, whenever, he knew he'd be totally welcome. It's horrible being beholden to somebody you are fighting with. He promised me he'd talk to me the next day. Since then I've smsed and emailed him and left a message on his mobile, rather pointless since it isn't with him. His passport was with his phone, so he hasn't gone far.

This is a grown man, the chances anything bad has happened to him aren't good. But, then, at some point in the evening he was a vulnerable, unhappy, drunk man.

I'm sure I'm not going to have to wait years to find out the ending, unlike the poor parents in the play. But still, I've been thinking the worst things. Not to mention just how angry I'm going to be with him when he turns out to be alright...which I'm sure is going to be the case. But still...

There is a good version of All My Sons on in London at the moment - well, it was on a month or so ago. You get to see David Suchet (who makes me weak at the knees) and a surprisingly good Zoe...the one from My Family. That inexplicably popular show where one can only regret that the fabulous Robert Lindsay doesn't move on to a show called Without My Family. Zoe is his dreadfully irritating wife. Suchet outweighed her in terms of whether I went, but she did a more than competent job as the wife. It's a great role as with the blindest of faith she waits for her son. I'm only at day one...and he's not my son, just a friend. But still...

---------------------------------

Update.

He's back and I'm so cross with him, I can scarcely yell how cross. How dare he. How dare he make me a murder suspect. When the police first rang me and said I was the last known person to speak to him, I blurted out 'But it wasn't me, I didn't kill him, I have an alibi, I was - ' and I realised what I'd done. 'Oh no, officer, you want to know why I've mentioned an alibi. I mean no innocent person would think of having an alibi, and I don't even know when for, honestly, officer, I have no idea WHEN he was murdered....I mean you are going to arrest me now aren't you, precisely because I have an alibi. For whenever it was.' I ended lamely. The policeman let me panic until I'd run out of things to say. 'We are all suspects, ma'am,' he said gravely. I asked him if he meant that philosophically or literally. He said that was a very interesting question. Well, we got talking, and one way or another, he asked me out as soon as the case is officially closed and I'm no longer a suspect. I said couldn't it be like The Bill and he dates me especially because I'm a suspect. He said this was real life ma'am. Of course. Real life. What was I thinking.

And then there is this: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/72532730

------------------------------------------------- ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |



Update: 22 Nov

I'm listening to an interview with David Suchet just before he goes on to the stage to do this play. He talks about how to keep fresh and eager and new for every performance of a long-running play. I imagine, he says, that there will be just one person, just one who has never been to the theatre before and I play to that person. He wants to give the most wonderful experience to that person.

Oh David. If you only knew. I sat there watching you in this play a few months ago and sitting next to me was a 12 year old boy who had never been to the theatre before. Nearby was his 14 year old sister. James was engrossed throughout. Lou loved it too. You couldn't have been more inspirational or given these two kids a better introduction to theatre.

I wish you knew what a great gift you bestowed upon them.

---------------------


I feel like I've had more of my fair share of a certain type of phone call, the one telling you somebody is dead. Twice over the last few years they've been a great shock, the closest of friends, one cooking, one vacuum cleaning, alive one moment, dead minutes later.

But today I've had the All My Sons experience and I can see already how it is worse. The police rang up earlier, enquiring after a missing person, when had I last talked to him. On Saturday evening, I said, a flurry of smses. They knew that, actually, because they had his mobile phone and that is how they contacted me.

The other person in his house had filed a missing persons report today. I'm guessing the same person he had a big fight with on Saturday evening. He told me he was going out to behave badly...aka get drunk, get laid was my interpretion. I begged him to come over, straight away, 4am, whenever, he knew he'd be totally welcome. It's horrible being beholden to somebody you are fighting with. He promised me he'd talk to me the next day. Since then I've smsed and emailed him and left a message on his mobile, rather pointless since it isn't with him. His passport was with his phone, so he hasn't gone far.

This is a grown man, the chances anything bad has happened to him aren't good. But, then, at some point in the evening he was a vulnerable, unhappy, drunk man.

I'm sure I'm not going to have to wait years to find out the ending, unlike the poor parents in the play. But still, I've been thinking the worst things. Not to mention just how angry I'm going to be with him when he turns out to be alright...which I'm sure is going to be the case. But still...

There is a good version of All My Sons on in London at the moment - well, it was on a month or so ago. You get to see David Suchet (who makes me weak at the knees) and a surprisingly good Zoe...the one from My Family. That inexplicably popular show where one can only regret that the fabulous Robert Lindsay doesn't move on to a show called Without My Family. Zoe is his dreadfully irritating wife. Suchet outweighed her in terms of whether I went, but she did a more than competent job as the wife. It's a great role as with the blindest of faith she waits for her son. I'm only at day one...and he's not my son, just a friend. But still...

---------------------------------

Update.

He's back and I'm so cross with him, I can scarcely yell how cross. How dare he. How dare he make me a murder suspect. When the police first rang me and said I was the last known person to speak to him, I blurted out 'But it wasn't me, I didn't kill him, I have an alibi, I was - ' and I realised what I'd done. 'Oh no, officer, you want to know why I've mentioned an alibi. I mean no innocent person would think of having an alibi, and I don't even know when for, honestly, officer, I have no idea WHEN he was murdered....I mean you are going to arrest me now aren't you, precisely because I have an alibi. For whenever it was.' I ended lamely. The policeman let me panic until I'd run out of things to say. 'We are all suspects, ma'am,' he said gravely. I asked him if he meant that philosophically or literally. He said that was a very interesting question. Well, we got talking, and one way or another, he asked me out as soon as the case is officially closed and I'm no longer a suspect. I said couldn't it be like The Bill and he dates me especially because I'm a suspect. He said this was real life ma'am. Of course. Real life. What was I thinking.

And then there is this: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/72532730

------------------------------------------------- ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |



Update: 22 Nov

I'm listening to an interview with David Suchet just before he goes on to the stage to do this play. He talks about how to keep fresh and eager and new for every performance of a long-running play. I imagine, he says, that there will be just one person, just one who has never been to the theatre before and I play to that person. He wants to give the most wonderful experience to that person.

Oh David. If you only knew. I sat there watching you in this play a few months ago and sitting next to me was a 12 year old boy who had never been to the theatre before. Nearby was his 14 year old sister. James was engrossed throughout. Lou loved it too. You couldn't have been more inspirational or given these two kids a better introduction to theatre.

I wish you knew what a great gift you bestowed upon them.

---------------------


I feel like I've had more of my fair share of a certain type of phone call, the one telling you somebody is dead. Twice over the last few years they've been a great shock, the closest of friends, one cooking, one vacuum cleaning, alive one moment, dead minutes later.

But today I've had the All My Sons experience and I can see already how it is worse. The police rang up earlier, enquiring after a missing person, when had I last talked to him. On Saturday evening, I said, a flurry of smses. They knew that, actually, because they had his mobile phone and that is how they contacted me.

The other person in his house had filed a missing persons report today. I'm guessing the same person he had a big fight with on Saturday evening. He told me he was going out to behave badly...aka get drunk, get laid was my interpretion. I begged him to come over, straight away, 4am, whenever, he knew he'd be totally welcome. It's horrible being beholden to somebody you are fighting with. He promised me he'd talk to me the next day. Since then I've smsed and emailed him and left a message on his mobile, rather pointless since it isn't with him. His passport was with his phone, so he hasn't gone far.

This is a grown man, the chances anything bad has happened to him aren't good. But, then, at some point in the evening he was a vulnerable, unhappy, drunk man.

I'm sure I'm not going to have to wait years to find out the ending, unlike the poor parents in the play. But still, I've been thinking the worst things. Not to mention just how angry I'm going to be with him when he turns out to be alright...which I'm sure is going to be the case. But still...

There is a good version of All My Sons on in London at the moment - well, it was on a month or so ago. You get to see David Suchet (who makes me weak at the knees) and a surprisingly good Zoe...the one from My Family. That inexplicably popular show where one can only regret that the fabulous Robert Lindsay doesn't move on to a show called Without My Family. Zoe is his dreadfully irritating wife. Suchet outweighed her in terms of whether I went, but she did a more than competent job as the wife. It's a great role as with the blindest of faith she waits for her son. I'm only at day one...and he's not my son, just a friend. But still...

---------------------------------

Update.

He's back and I'm so cross with him, I can scarcely yell how cross. How dare he. How dare he make me a murder suspect. When the police first rang me and said I was the last known person to speak to him, I blurted out 'But it wasn't me, I didn't kill him, I have an alibi, I was - ' and I realised what I'd done. 'Oh no, officer, you want to know why I've mentioned an alibi. I mean no innocent person would think of having an alibi, and I don't even know when for, honestly, officer, I have no idea WHEN he was murdered....I mean you are going to arrest me now aren't you, precisely because I have an alibi. For whenever it was.' I ended lamely. The policeman let me panic until I'd run out of things to say. 'We are all suspects, ma'am,' he said gravely. I asked him if he meant that philosophically or literally. He said that was a very interesting question. Well, we got talking, and one way or another, he asked me out as soon as the case is officially closed and I'm no longer a suspect. I said couldn't it be like The Bill and he dates me especially because I'm a suspect. He said this was real life ma'am. Of course. Real life. What was I thinking.

And then there is this: http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/72532730

------------------------------------------------- ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 19 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (5 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Miller, ArthurAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Mickel, Wolfgang W.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The back yard of the Keller home in the outskirts of an American town.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

A searing exposure of war profiteering and the awful price paid by self-interest and greed, 'All My Sons' represented Miller's first Broadway success in 1947.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.84)
0.5
1 4
1.5
2 10
2.5 1
3 36
3.5 6
4 72
4.5 5
5 42

GenreThing

No genres

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 159,207,913 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível