Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

In the Shadow of the Banyan por Vaddey…
A carregar...

In the Shadow of the Banyan (edição 2012)

por Vaddey Ratner

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
8546318,717 (4.1)108
Told from the tender perspective of a young girl who comes of age amid the Cambodian killing fields, this novel is based on the author's personal story. For seven-year-old Raami, the shattering end of childhood begins with the footsteps of her father returning home in the early dawn hours bringing details of the civil war that has overwhelmed the streets of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital. Soon the family's world of carefully guarded royal privilege is swept up in the chaos of revolution and forced exodus. Over the next four years, as she endures the deaths of family members, starvation, and brutal forced labor, Raami clings to the only remaining vestige of childhood, the mythical legends and poems told to her by her father. In a climate of systematic violence where memory is sickness and justification for execution, Raami fights for her improbable survival.… (mais)
Membro:becka11y2
Título:In the Shadow of the Banyan
Autores:Vaddey Ratner
Informação:Publisher Unknown (2012), Kindle Edition
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:survival, human resilience, unspeakable horrors, khmer rouge, autobiographical fiction, cambodia, genocide, from Shelfari

Pormenores da obra

In the Shadow of the Banyan por Vaddey Ratner

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 108 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 63 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A Novel of Genocide in Cambodia

"In the Shadow of the Banyan" follows a young Cambodian girl's life during the four-year genocidal Khmer Rogue regime. It is the only piece of fiction about the genocide that I know of. Most literature about the Khmer Rogue is written as interviews, non-fiction narratives, or simple histories.

Ratner's novel is very poetic and full of imagery. She has a gift for description of character and scenes. There are many, many comparisons and analogies made to various gods in Cambodian mythology which. So frequent are these comparisons that they pause the narrative at times, though they are almost completely absent in the second half of the book. The story present is very consistent with the non-fiction about this period, no doubt borrowing on Ratner's own experience in the genocide. It is told through the eyes of a young girl as she progresses through several harrowing years, losing her father, grandmother, and sibling to murder and starvation. There are innumerable thoughts into human character and observations about the world around her that a child would not be able to process. This draws the story away from what could have otherwise given insight into a child's thinking and pushes it more toward an adult's point of view, or an incredibly observant, incredibly insightful, and incredibly discerning child's perspective.

Unfortunately, the details in the book are closer to reality than fiction. No man, woman, or child should ever suffer as much as anyone suffered during the Khmer Rogue's time in power. This point is well made in "In the Shadow of the Banyan." ( )
  mvblair | Aug 8, 2020 |
This book. ♥♥♥

I loved the writing, the story telling. Such a heartbreaking story, yet so full of love and beautiful things, still. And the writing. Oh my the writing. ♥♥♥ ( )
  prettygoodyear | Jun 29, 2020 |
This is interesting and somewhat informative as a semi-autobiographical narrative of living through the khmer-rouge takeover of Cambodia in the 70's. As a novel it doesn't fare so well. I found myself skimming most chapters to extract an ok story from a swamp of flowery prose. The content-to-fluff ratio is about 1:3 most of the time, with occasional stretches of more focused story telling. It's not bad fluff as the stuff goes, and if it's your kind of thing then it may heighten your appreciation for the book.

The only other downside is the dubious perspective that it's natural and right for royalty to be elevated above and fawned over by a population. This is likely an unconscious slip since the author makes a couple overt attempts to promote the opposite idea. Those scenes are not convincing and the undercurrent running through the book as a whole undermines them. It's also a little awkward at the end when the author parades her own position as royalty under the guise of honoring her father (a slain prince).

If there were half stars, this would be 1.5 material. ( )
  reg_lt | Feb 7, 2020 |
“Light blinked across the inky surface. A cluster of fireflies, I thought. Always somewhere there was light, and, though transient, it flashed all the more brilliantly because of the surrounding dark.” — Vaddey Ratner, “In the Shadow of the Banyan”

With that powerful image near the end of “In the Shadow of the Banyan” (2012), first-time novelist Vaddey Ratner suggests the hope within little Raami and her once-delicate mother that allows them to survive those years in which the Khmer Rouge destroy Cambodia in their mindless quest to create a perfect country.

In her autobiographical novel, Ratner tells of an elite family in Phnom Penh as the rebels take over the country. Seven-year-old Raami's father is both a prince and a poet. Her family has always had servants to do their work. They are exactly the kind of people the Khmer Rouge wants to purge. She, her parents, little sister and the entire extended family are sent to a rural area and put to work, mostly in rice fields. Little Raami, although crippled by polio, must work, as well. Despite promises by "the organization," the provided food is woefully inadequate. Raami eats insects when she can catch them.

Gradually the family is separated. She will never learn what happens to her father. Some people are killed. Others die from hunger or disease. Those with the guns, most of them little more than children, don't seem to care.

For all its terror and suffering, this is a beautiful novel full of beautiful language, beautiful metaphors and beautiful ideas. It took Ratner half a lifetime to write this story of her early life, most of it true. She must have despaired of ever getting it all down on paper. Yet hope stayed alive, a light in the darkness. ( )
  hardlyhardy | Feb 4, 2019 |
When a person shares a personal story of man's inhumanity to man, survival of a genocide, I feel that the story must be read and shared. This novel, based on the author's childhood experience of the Khmer Rouge's inhuman treatment of the people in Cambodia after the April 17, 1975 takeover of the government in Phnom Phen, is one that should be read by all of us in our well governed, over fed country, where we have the luxury of pondering gay marriage, gun control, or other social issues.
Told from the perspective of a 7 year old girl, the story is innocent of some of the most gristly crimes against humanity, and could certainly be read by middle school children. Like the novel Shades of Gray,(which I also just finished) there are no horrible rapes or killings witnessed by the child, but the suffering and the emotional trauma are raw and real enough. And, as in Shades of Gray, there is an enduring message of hope and love. ( )
  ioplibrarian | Aug 26, 2018 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 63 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
How is it that so much of this bleak novel is full of beauty, even joy? ...In interviews, Ratner has explained that she chose to write a novel rather than a memoir partly because she was too young at the time “to recall the exact details.” As a work of fiction, “In the Shadow of the Banyan” is less a testament to atrocity than a reconciliation with the past. At one point, Raami’s nanny tells her that stories “are like footpaths of the gods. They lead us back and forth across time and space and connect us to the entire universe.” What is remarkable, and honorable, here is the absence of anger, and the capacity — seemingly infinite — for empathy.
 
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For my mother In the memory of my father, Neak Ang Mechas Sisowath Ayuravann
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
War entered my childhood world not with the blasts of rockets and bombs but with my father's footsteps as he walked through the hallway, passing my bedroom toward his.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

Told from the tender perspective of a young girl who comes of age amid the Cambodian killing fields, this novel is based on the author's personal story. For seven-year-old Raami, the shattering end of childhood begins with the footsteps of her father returning home in the early dawn hours bringing details of the civil war that has overwhelmed the streets of Phnom Penh, Cambodia's capital. Soon the family's world of carefully guarded royal privilege is swept up in the chaos of revolution and forced exodus. Over the next four years, as she endures the deaths of family members, starvation, and brutal forced labor, Raami clings to the only remaining vestige of childhood, the mythical legends and poems told to her by her father. In a climate of systematic violence where memory is sickness and justification for execution, Raami fights for her improbable survival.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.1)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 4
2.5 4
3 26
3.5 13
4 70
4.5 28
5 55

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,901,332 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível