Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the…
A carregar...

Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of… (original 2012; edição 2012)

por Gilbert King (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
6753926,268 (4.38)123
In 1949, Florida's orange industry was booming with cheap Jim Crow labor. When a white seventeen-year-old Groveland girl cried rape, vicious Sheriff McCall was fast on the trail of four young blacks who dared to envision a future for themselves. Then the Ku Klux Klan rolled into town, burning homes and chasing hundreds of blacks into the swamps. So began the chain of events that would bring Thurgood Marshall, the man known as "Mr. Civil Rights," into the fray. Associates thought it was suicidal for him to wade into the "Florida Terror" at a time when he was irreplaceable to the burgeoning civil rights movement, but the lawyer would not shrink from the fight--not after the Klan had murdered one of Marshall's NAACP associates and Marshall had endured threats that he would be next. Drawing on a wealth of never-before-published material, including the FBI's unredacted Groveland case files, as well as the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund files, King shines new light on this remarkable civil rights crusader against a heroic backdrop.--From publisher description.… (mais)
Membro:gigapoctopus
Título:Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America
Autores:Gilbert King (Autor)
Informação:Harper (2013), Edition: Reprint, 453 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Devil in the Grove por Gilbert King (2012)

  1. 00
    Cool Hand Luke: A Novel por Donn Pearce (Stbalbach)
    Stbalbach: Vivid descriptions of mid-20th century middle-Florida tyrannical red-neck law enforcement.
  2. 00
    Scottsboro por Ellen Feldman (sjmccreary)
    sjmccreary: a novel about the 1931 Alabama case that was mentioned several times in the book
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 123 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 39 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Since relocating to Florida, I have been purposely reading books set in my new home state. Devil in the Grove is well-researched nonfiction about a legal case known as the Groveland Boys. A talented author wrote the book, yet it is a disturbing story about Lake County in Florida. The main story is about four young Black men accused of raping a white woman on July 15, 1949. Police eventually kill one of the four escapes, and the other three withstand beatings by law enforcement officials, go to prison, and stand trial. Other threads of the story describe the widespread lynchings and discrimination against Blacks in the South, particularly in Florida, which has the dubious record of having more lynchings than any other state.

While describing events leading up to the trial of Sam Shepherd, Walter Irvin and
Charles Greenlee, the reader learns a great deal about the power of Sheriff William McCall of Lake County. His blatant racism and corruption mark his term from 1940 to 1972. When the author demonstrates how closely he and other sheriffs identify with the Klu Klux Klan, I wanted to believe that the story was fiction. It is so alarming that the bias in law enforcement is so deep-seated.

Norma Lee Padgett, the white woman and supposed victim of the rape, is described as a “bad egg” by community members, and her story is contrived and hardly credible. Yet, because she is white, she is protected by the sheriff, his men, and most neighbors. Norma and her family are part of the orange grove, Minute Maid culture, and we meet others who were integral to these agricultural communities in Florida. So many elements of everyday life emphasized the huge racial divisions in the Jim Crow south.

Throughout the book, we also learn about the development of the NAACP and particularly Thurgood Marshall’s role in its growth. Marshall’s leadership in the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund monitored the legal proceedings of the Groveland Boys, and his eventual personal involvement led to the story garnering national attention. Marshall’s engagement brought some semblance of honesty to the case, but unfortunately, the book and overall case do not have a happy ending.
See my reviews:
https://quipsandquotes.net/ ( )
  LindaLoretz | Sep 21, 2021 |
Several newspapers over the past several days (November 21, 2013, USA Today, NY Times, LA Times,) noted that the Alabama State Parole Board just granted posthumous pardons for three black men known as "the Scottsboro Boys". These men were unjustly accused and convicted of raping a white woman in the 1930's, and the case came to symbolize racial injustice in the Deep South during that era. I don't imagine that this particular newspaper article caught the eye of most casual readers. After all, they referred to a long forgotten event from over eighty years ago. It probably wouldn't have caught my eye either if it wasn't for the fact that I just finished "Devil in the Grove", by Gilbert King.

"Devil in the Grove" tells the story of Thurgood Marshall (later an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court) and his work on a very similar case involving "the Groveland Boys". Like the Scottsboro Boys, the Groveland boys case involved the unjust conviction of several blacks accused of raping a white woman in Florida in the late 1940's.

While we've all probably heard stories about the Jim Crow era during the first half of the 20th century, it's hard to really conceive of what life might have been like at that time in the segregated South. Gilbert King's book truly brings that era to life, and I found myself torn between not wanting to hear any more about the abuses of blacks in the south at that time, and yet still anxiously wanting to hear more of the story about Thurgood Marshall and the Groveland Boys.

During the 1940's and 1950's, Marshall was one of the foremost civil rights lawyers in the Country. As a young lawyer for the NAACP, he exhibited true bravery in confronting segregationists in the deep south. King's book makes clear in a most convincing fashion that Marshall was every bit as important as activists like Dr. Martin Luther King or Rosa Parks in terms of drawing attention to the inequity of justice for black Americans, and in establishing civil rights for his race.

Those who may have read Doug McAdam's "Freedom Summer", or who remember the 1980's movie "Mississippi Burning" starring Gene Hackman, about the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964, may have some sense of what life was like in that era. Gilbert King builds on those stories in describing the many obstacles Thurgood Marshall had to overcome in defending blacks in Southern courtrooms. The worst elements of society are brought to life in King's description of the trial of the Groveland Boys, i.e., a biased and murderous sheriff, the violence of the KKK, white mob violence and intimidation of blacks or black sympathizers, rigged court systems, etc. Standing up to all this in an unwelcoming South was Thurgood Marshall and his team, some of whom in fact did not survive the threats, intimidation, and violence against them.

In addition to the Groveland boys case, King also details Marshall's importance in other landmark civil rights cases. Most importantly perhaps, was the Brown v Board of Education case he successfully argued in front of the Supreme Court in 1954, which ended segregation in public schools.

Reading King's book really give the reader an understanding of the racial tensions of the past. After reading the book, you really have to appreciate how far the Country has progressed over these past sixty or seventy years. King shows how blacks in Florida were without rights, considered as racially inferior, and "kept in their place" in those days. And within a generation or two, a black candidate for President actually was able to carry the State of Florida. An amazing contrast, one you truly come to appreciate after reading "The Groveland Boys".
( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
nonfiction (civil rights cases in 1950s Florida) [pulitzer #20]. I don't know how people can criticize G.King for presenting history in such a dramatic way, because it *was* a life-and-death situation for so many people (and more than half of them didn't survive). If kids read this instead of dry old history books that gloss over everything, we'd all have a much better understanding of our world and its history. ( )
  reader1009 | Jul 3, 2021 |
Loved this book. Very educational and eye opening. ( )
  lexiej | Jun 27, 2021 |
Thurgood Marshall is a prominent figure in the Civil Rights world. Most know he was the lead attorney who argued the Brown vs. Board of Education case that changed the face of racial integration in schools. But most don't know his early work for the NAACP, much of which was focused on racially significant criminal cases. This book highlights the case of three men falsely accused of raping a white woman in Florida, and the racial unrest that surrounded it. The level of racism and violence in Florida in mid-century America was stunning. Everyone hears about Mississippi and Alabama, but somehow Florida doesn't get the infamy it deserves. While the underlying case and Marshall's work require notice, the book is too disconnected because Gilbert King loops the chronology of events back around several time to pick up contextual information, some of which is not strictly necessary to understand the narrative. Not a bad book, but I can think of others I'd recommend before this one that highlight stories of the Civil Rights Movement. ( )
  blackdogbooks | Feb 16, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 39 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
“Gilbert King has done a remarkable job of weaving together history, sociology, law and detective work of his own, to reveal facts that even I, one of the defense counsel in the case, had not been aware of until now.” (Jack Greenberg, Alphonse Fletcher Professor of Law, Columbia University, former Director-Counsel, NAACP Legal Defense Fund. )
adicionada por krazy4katz | editarAmazon.com, Jack Greenberg
 

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Gilbert Kingautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
James, Peter FrancisNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
For Lorna, Maddie, and Liv and in memory of Matthew P. (Matty) Boylan
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
November 18, 1946

"If that son of a bitch contradicts me again, I'm going to wrap a chair around his goddamned head."
[Prologue] All his life, it seemed he'd been staring out the windows of trains rumbling toward the unknown.
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
There is a law governing the meeting of the races. When a powerful race meets a helpless race, two things happen. First there is a carnival of crime. Cruelty and oppression take place: some men in each race become hard-hearted. But the reverse also happens thereafter; goodness and mercy are developed; certain men become saints and heroes.

John Jay Chapman
The Negro Problem, 1915
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC
In 1949, Florida's orange industry was booming with cheap Jim Crow labor. When a white seventeen-year-old Groveland girl cried rape, vicious Sheriff McCall was fast on the trail of four young blacks who dared to envision a future for themselves. Then the Ku Klux Klan rolled into town, burning homes and chasing hundreds of blacks into the swamps. So began the chain of events that would bring Thurgood Marshall, the man known as "Mr. Civil Rights," into the fray. Associates thought it was suicidal for him to wade into the "Florida Terror" at a time when he was irreplaceable to the burgeoning civil rights movement, but the lawyer would not shrink from the fight--not after the Klan had murdered one of Marshall's NAACP associates and Marshall had endured threats that he would be next. Drawing on a wealth of never-before-published material, including the FBI's unredacted Groveland case files, as well as the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund files, King shines new light on this remarkable civil rights crusader against a heroic backdrop.--From publisher description.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.38)
0.5
1
1.5
2 4
2.5
3 8
3.5 5
4 47
4.5 24
5 65

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,477,172 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível