Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage…
A carregar...

Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage (The Crosswicks Journal, Book… (edição 1989)

por Madeleine L'engle

Séries: The Crosswicks Journal (book 4)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
9491216,306 (4.15)37
In the final memoir of her Crosswicks Journals, the author of A Wrinkle in Time paints an intimate portrait of her forty-year marriage. A long-term marriage has to move beyond chemistry to compatibility, to friendship, to companionship.   As Newbery Medal winner Madeleine L'Engle describes a relationship characterized by compassion, respect, and growth, as well as challenge and conflict, she beautifully evokes the life she and her husband, actor Hugh Franklin, built and the family they cherished.   Beginning with their very different childhoods, L'Engle chronicles the twists and turns that led two young artists to New York City in the 1940s, where they were both pursuing careers in theater. While working on a production of Anton Chekov's The Cherry Orchard, they sparked a connection that would endure until Franklin's death in 1986. L'Engle recalls years spent raising their children at Crosswicks, the Connecticut farmhouse that became an icon of family, and the support she and her husband drew from each other as artists struggling--separately and together--to find both professional and personal fulfillment.   At once heartfelt and heartbreaking, Two-Part Invention is L'Engle's most personal work--the revelation of a marriage and the exploration of intertwined lives inevitably marked by love and loss.   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Madeleine L'Engle including rare images from the author's estate.… (mais)
Membro:diana.gabaldon
Título:Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage (The Crosswicks Journal, Book 4)
Autores:Madeleine L'engle
Informação:HarperOne (1989), Paperback, 240 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:non-fiction, garage, spiritual guidance, marriage, series, autobiography, communication, discussion guide, group discussion, relationships, Book 4,

Pormenores da obra

Two-Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage por Madeleine L'Engle

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 37 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
3.5 stars. Perhaps the weakest of the Crosswicks books, but still very good. ( )
  nicholasjjordan | Nov 13, 2019 |
I enjoyed this book much. A glimpse into the life and marriage of L'Engle has given me great perspective on life. She is a very engaging writer and I often felt her emotions -- joy and grief alike. I most especially enjoyed her habit of collecting sayings and phrases throughout the years. These show up throughout the narrative. Indeed, she draws much from her reading, writing, and plain living, weaving them into the story of her marriage.
  cambernard90 | Apr 12, 2017 |
This is fourth in the 'Crosswicks Journals' - Madeleine L'Engle's reflections and musings about life and faith, based on her personal journals. In this volume she describes her first meeting with her husband Hugh, their courtship and marriage, right up to the time when, after forty years of married life, he loses his fight with cancer following some difficult and painful months.

I love the rather rambling style, the digressions into other topics, and also the way that we're allowed so much insight into this very special relationship. In places it's quite moving, despite knowing all along what the ending would be. Recommended to anyone who's read others in the Crosswicks series, or who likes fairly unstructured autobiographical writing. ( )
  SueinCyprus | Jan 26, 2016 |
I don't know if it's a similarity of mind or simply the sheer number of her words that I've read, but Madeleine L'Engle's writing feels like home.

This book is her memoir of her marriage.

"After I had declined to be my Hungarian friend's mistress, I was more than ever convinced that marriage was not going to be part of my pattern. I would write, see friends, write, go to the theatre, write, but ultimately I was going to walk alone." (p42)

"Love of music, of sunsets and sea; a liking for the same kind of people; political opinions that are not radically divergent; a similar stance as we look at the stars and think of the marvelous strangeness of this universe -- these are what build a marriage." (p77)

"Our love has been anything but perfect and anything but static. Inevitably there have been times when one of us has outrun the other and has had to wait patiently for the other to catch up. There have been times when we have misunderstood each other, demanded too much of each other, been insensitive to the other's needs. I do not believe there is any marriage where this does not happen. The growth of love is not a straight line, but a series of hills and valleys. I suspect that in every good marriage there are times when love seems to be over. Sometimes these desert lines are simply the only way to the next oasis, which is far more lush and beautiful after the desert crossing than it could possibly have been without it." (p100)

"If we are not willing to fail we will never accomplish anything. All creative acts involve the risk of failure. Marriage is a terrible risk. So is having children. So is giving a performance in the theatre, or the writing of a book. Whenever something is completed successfully, then we must move on, and that is again to risk failure." (p173) ( )
  ellen.w | Jun 1, 2014 |
I don't know if it's a similarity of mind or simply the sheer number of her words that I've read, but Madeleine L'Engle's writing feels like home.

This book is her memoir of her marriage.

"After I had declined to be my Hungarian friend's mistress, I was more than ever convinced that marriage was not going to be part of my pattern. I would write, see friends, write, go to the theatre, write, but ultimately I was going to walk alone." (p42)

"Love of music, of sunsets and sea; a liking for the same kind of people; political opinions that are not radically divergent; a similar stance as we look at the stars and think of the marvelous strangeness of this universe -- these are what build a marriage." (p77)

"Our love has been anything but perfect and anything but static. Inevitably there have been times when one of us has outrun the other and has had to wait patiently for the other to catch up. There have been times when we have misunderstood each other, demanded too much of each other, been insensitive to the other's needs. I do not believe there is any marriage where this does not happen. The growth of love is not a straight line, but a series of hills and valleys. I suspect that in every good marriage there are times when love seems to be over. Sometimes these desert lines are simply the only way to the next oasis, which is far more lush and beautiful after the desert crossing than it could possibly have been without it." (p100)

"If we are not willing to fail we will never accomplish anything. All creative acts involve the risk of failure. Marriage is a terrible risk. So is having children. So is giving a performance in the theatre, or the writing of a book. Whenever something is completed successfully, then we must move on, and that is again to risk failure." (p173) ( )
  ellen.w | Jun 1, 2014 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 12 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
for Hugh
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Crosswicks is a typical New England farmhouse, built sometime in the middle of the eighteenth century, so it is well over two hundred years old.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

In the final memoir of her Crosswicks Journals, the author of A Wrinkle in Time paints an intimate portrait of her forty-year marriage. A long-term marriage has to move beyond chemistry to compatibility, to friendship, to companionship.   As Newbery Medal winner Madeleine L'Engle describes a relationship characterized by compassion, respect, and growth, as well as challenge and conflict, she beautifully evokes the life she and her husband, actor Hugh Franklin, built and the family they cherished.   Beginning with their very different childhoods, L'Engle chronicles the twists and turns that led two young artists to New York City in the 1940s, where they were both pursuing careers in theater. While working on a production of Anton Chekov's The Cherry Orchard, they sparked a connection that would endure until Franklin's death in 1986. L'Engle recalls years spent raising their children at Crosswicks, the Connecticut farmhouse that became an icon of family, and the support she and her husband drew from each other as artists struggling--separately and together--to find both professional and personal fulfillment.   At once heartfelt and heartbreaking, Two-Part Invention is L'Engle's most personal work--the revelation of a marriage and the exploration of intertwined lives inevitably marked by love and loss.   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Madeleine L'Engle including rare images from the author's estate.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.15)
0.5
1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 20
3.5 5
4 48
4.5 4
5 47

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 157,319,527 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível