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The Garden of Evening Mists

por Tan Twan Eng

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1,63710910,932 (4.13)1 / 569
"Malaya, 1951. Yun Ling Teoh, the scarred lone survivor of a brutal Japanese wartime camp, seeks solace among the jungle-fringed tea plantations of Cameron Highlands. There she discovers Yugiri, the only Japanese garden in Malaya, and its owner and creator, the enigmatic Aritomo, exiled former gardener of the emperor of Japan. Despite her hatred of the Japanese, Yun Ling seeks to engage Aritomo to create a garden in memory of her sister, who died in the camp. Aritomo refuses but agrees to accept Yun Ling as his apprentice "until the monsoon comes." Then she can design a garden for herself. As the months pass, Yun Ling finds herself intimately drawn to the gardener and his art, while all around them a communist guerilla war rages. But the Garden of Evening Mists remains a place of mystery. Who is Aritomo and how did he come to leave Japan? And is the real story of how Yun Ling managed to survive the war perhaps the darkest secret of all?"--P. [4] of cover.… (mais)
Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, JoeB1934, sharon.solo31, Aidan767, magneticvoyager, Ed.M-S, jenkies720, Pohai
  1. 10
    The Remains of the Day por Kazuo Ishiguro (CGlanovsky)
  2. 10
    The Gift of Rain por Tan Twan Eng (M_Clark)
    M_Clark: The Gift of Rain is the first book by Tan Twan Eng and is actually much better than The Garden of Evening Mists
  3. 00
    The Inheritance of Loss por Kiran Desai (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Non-linear storytelling. Post-colonial novel. Deals with a period of political unrest.
  4. 00
    Black Oxen por Elizabeth Knox (lottpoet)
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Grupo TópicoMessagensÚltima Mensagem 
 Booker Prize: The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng7 não lido / 7edwinbcn, Setembro 2015

» Ver também 569 menções

Inglês (107)  Espanhol (1)  Alemão (1)  Todas as línguas (109)
Mostrando 1-5 de 109 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I loved this book! Fascinating characters in a very exotic locale. I will read the author’s other book for sure! ( )
  ShawnEllsworth | May 29, 2024 |
[b:The Garden of Evening Mists|12031532|The Garden of Evening Mists |Tan Twan Eng|http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1333033941s/12031532.jpg|16997854] is a complicated story as it wends its way back and forth through Yun Ling Teoh's life and fluctuating memories, from old age to youth to adulthood, and the torture suffered at the hands of her Japanese captors in wartime Malaya. Eng writes beautifully of the jungle settings in the book and of the garden she yearns to build in memory of her lost sister with the aid of a Japanese gardener. It is possible to visualize the views from the garden and its plantings as well as the neighboring tea plantation, even to taste the tea and smell the air Eng describes yet the pacing set me adrift in spite of the evocative prose. Smatterings of Malayan history are deposited throughout the story and call for further exploration to clarify some confusion from the flashback technique. The plot and its violent swings through the terrors of occupation and later communist guerrilla insurgency sent me elsewhere for reading relief but the final pages of the book brought peace to both the Yun Ling and this reader. While none of the characters are explored adequately and relationships are puzzling (why the bad relationship with her parents, what is her resistance to Frederick, and why the oddly constrained but lifelong passion for Aritomo), her archery symbolizes Yun Ling’s reborn strength and grace as she approaches the challenges of aging and illness. ( )
  featherbooks | May 7, 2024 |
117000
  filbo_2024 | Apr 24, 2024 |
Just finished 'The Garden of Evening Mists' by Tan Twan Eng. I bought it at a remainder bookstore because I liked the title and vaguely hoped that exploring the ideas that form Japanese gardens might be interesting. Also, it felt refreshing to be reading a book about Malaya and its sense of identity as seen through the eyes of Yun Ling, a Malaysian Chinese woman. There were two obvious and probably superfluous narrative devices. The first, that Yun Ling had some form of dementia, was about to lose her memory and needed to record her story. The second, that she was inevitably telling her story to the Japanese gardener, Aritomo who became her lover and was also a tattoo master who ultimately used her as a canvass that somehow mysteriously explained the garden. However, there really wasn't much information about the working of Japanese gardens apart from a couple of hints about borrowing/mirroring scenery and digging-in rocks. Aritomo was indistinctly drawn as a shadowy character - almost a caricature. Their relationship felt quite cold - almost to the extent that it was hard to understand what drew Aritomo and Yun Ling together as lovers other than to satisfy the needs of the narrative. The book seemed almost burdened with superfluous stories (interesting as they were) about Japanese pilots, hidden gold and South African tea planters. All against a backdrop of attacks by communist terrorists (the CTs). The text was sprinkled with Malay and South African words which I couldn't quite pronounce but that was my failing. Overall, a good but unsatisfactory read that promised far more than it delivered. ( )
  simonpockley | Feb 25, 2024 |
This story told by the fictional sole survivor of a concentration camp during Japan's occupation of Malaya will stay with me a long time. After being diagnosed with aphasia that will dull her mind and steal her memories, retired Chinese-Malayan Judge Teoh Yun Ling, returns from Kuala Lumpur to Yugiri, in the mountains, to record her memories of the place she visited three decades earlier, just after the end of World War II, to persuade ex-Imperial Japanese gardener Nakamura Aritomo, who is also an artist, to make a garden in memory of her beloved older sister, Yun Hong, who was an artist as well. The sisters had spent four years in a brutal Japanese slave labor camp, nourished and transported by memories of the gardens in Kyoto they had visited with their parents and brother before World War II. Aritomo turns down Yun Ling’s request, but she, instead, becomes his apprentice and then his lover.

Aritomo is a complex, fascinating character infused with exacting patience, artistry, and wisdom, but he might also be a spy. Only years later, when Yun Ling finally deciphers his last message to her, can she reconcile her grief and guilt over surviving the slave camp, while her sister and all the other prisoners who were sent there in the four years of her stay perished. It is a melancholy, but compelling, story that weaves together acts of inhumanity, violence, and deception with moments of beauty, grace, and redemption. ( )
  bschweiger | Feb 4, 2024 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 109 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The language is as lush as the landscape he seeks to describe. His prose is punctuated with clever imagery; in reuniting with Teoh, Eng brilliantly describes Frederick's wry reaction "A smile skims across his face, capsizing an instant later."

Though on the whole the descriptive narrative was attractive, at times more concision might have saved it from becoming overwrought, as in my view it was, and rather frustratingly holding back what was otherwise a compelling and unique story.
adicionada por geocroc | editarHuffington Post, Catriona Holmes (Oct 15, 2012)
 
As in his first novel, The Gift of Rain, Tan employs exotic settings and mystical aspects of Japanese culture to drive his narrative. But this time the effect is darker. Aritomo's mastery of the art of shakkei - "Borrowed Scenery" - initially seems enlightened, but as we come to question his true motives for absconding to this obscure backwater, it appears increasingly deceptive.
Though later plot elements surrounding a search for buried wartime treasure do not always complement the atmosphere Tan has carefully constructed, this is a beautiful, dark and wistful exploration of loss and remembrance that, appropriately, will stay with you long after reading.
adicionada por geocroc | editarDaily Telegraph, Andrew Marszal (Oct 15, 2012)
 
This novel ticks many boxes: its themes are serious, its historic grounding solid, its structure careful, its old-fashioned ornamentalism respectable. The reason I found it impossible to love is the quality of the writing. There is no discernible personality in the dutiful, dull voice of Yun Ling, and non-events stalk us on every page: "for a timeless moment I looked straight into his eyes"; "For a long while he does not say anything. Finally he begins to speak in a slow, steady voice." The self-conscious dialogue resembles a history lesson collated for the benefit of the western reader, and everything is ponderously "like" something else, so it takes twice as long: "We were like two moths around a candle, circling closer and closer to the flames, waiting to see whose wings would catch fire first." Despite the dramatic events, the overall effect is one of surprising blandness, like something you've read before.
adicionada por vancouverdeb | editarThe Guardian, Kapka Kassabova (Aug 24, 2012)
 
This is a good old-fashioned story with a plot that arcs gracefully, maintains suspense, and stays true to characterisation. Yun Ling’s independent spirit and her anger seep like ink-stains into the narrative, but its distilled essence is a quieter appraisal of the dichotomy of memory, its treacherous failures, its cruel conveniences, its fadeout and deliverance. Outside Magnus’s house are two statues—one is of Mnemosyne the goddess of memory and the other is of her twin sister, the goddess of forgetting, whose name, of course, has been forgotten.

Here, too, the garden is the conceit. “A garden borrows from the earth, the sky, and everything around it, but you borrow from time,” Yun Ling accuses Aritomo, “Your memories are a form of shakkei too. You bring them in to make your life here feel less empty. Like the mountains and the clouds over your garden, you can see them, but they will always be out of reach.” The garden that Yun Ling intends to make is about more than a desire to preserve the memory of her sister, though, for in many ways, it was the idea of this garden that kept the sisters hopeful through their long internment. The Japanese garden, with its many deceptions and beauties, becomes a well-formed metaphor for the ways in which our lives are lived.
 
Aritomo, the enigmatic former gardener to the Emperor of Japan who glides through Tan Twan Eng’s second novel, tells his female apprentice in the Cameron Highlands of early-1950s Malaya that “Every aspect of gardening is a form of deception”.

Just the same applies, you might argue, to the art of fiction, with its incomplete points-of-view and deceptive trompe d’oeil vistas. Tan’s story here is just as elegantly planted as his Man Booker-long listed debut The Gift of Rain, and even more tantalisingly evocative.

Suffused with a satisfying richness of colour and character, it still abounds in hidden passageways and occult corners. Mysteries and secrets persist. Tan dwells often on the borderline states, the in between areas, of Japanese art: the archer’s hiatus before the arrow speeds from the bow; the patch of skin that a master of the horimono tattoo will leave bare; or the “beautiful and sorrowful” moment “just as the last leaf is about to drop”.
adicionada por kidzdoc | editarThe Independent, Boyd Tonkin (Apr 28, 2012)
 

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Tan Twan Engautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Bentinck, AnnaNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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There is a goddess of Memory, Mnemosyne; but none of Forgetting. Yet there should be, as they are twin sisters, twin powers, and walk on either side of us, disputing for sovereignty over us and who we are, all the way until death.

Richard Holmes, A Meander Through Memory and Forgetting
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For my sister

And

Opgedra aan A J Buys — sonder jou sou hierdie boek dubbel so lank en halfpad so goed wees. Mag jou eie mooi taal altyd gedy.
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On a mountain above the clouds once lived a man who had been the gardener of the Emperor of Japan.
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Memory is like patches of sunlight in an overcast valley, shifting with the movement of the clouds. Now and then the light will fall on a particular point in time, illuminating it for a moment before the wind seals up the gap, and the world is in shadows again.
Are all of us the same, I wonder, navigating our lives by interpreting the silences between words spoken, analyzing the returning echoes of our memory in order to chart the terrain, in order to make sense of the world around us?
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"Malaya, 1951. Yun Ling Teoh, the scarred lone survivor of a brutal Japanese wartime camp, seeks solace among the jungle-fringed tea plantations of Cameron Highlands. There she discovers Yugiri, the only Japanese garden in Malaya, and its owner and creator, the enigmatic Aritomo, exiled former gardener of the emperor of Japan. Despite her hatred of the Japanese, Yun Ling seeks to engage Aritomo to create a garden in memory of her sister, who died in the camp. Aritomo refuses but agrees to accept Yun Ling as his apprentice "until the monsoon comes." Then she can design a garden for herself. As the months pass, Yun Ling finds herself intimately drawn to the gardener and his art, while all around them a communist guerilla war rages. But the Garden of Evening Mists remains a place of mystery. Who is Aritomo and how did he come to leave Japan? And is the real story of how Yun Ling managed to survive the war perhaps the darkest secret of all?"--P. [4] of cover.

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