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Sweet Tooth por Ian McEwan
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Sweet Tooth (original 2012; edição 2013)

por Ian McEwan (Auteur)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2,8671863,710 (3.53)167
Recruited into MI5 against a backdrop of the Cold War in 1972, Cambridge student Serena Frome, a compulsive reader, is assigned to infiltrate the literary circle of a promising young writer whose politics align with those of the government, a situation that is compromised when she falls in love with him.… (mais)
Membro:Dieseldogz
Título:Sweet Tooth
Autores:Ian McEwan (Auteur)
Informação:Vintage (2016), Edition: 01, 384 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Sweet Tooth por Ian McEwan (2012)

  1. 00
    Too Bad to Die por Francine Mathews (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: A tense and enthralling historical thriller in which British Naval Intelligence officer Ian Fleming attempts to foil a Nazi plot to assassinate FDR, Churchill, and Stalin.
  2. 11
    The Unwitting por Ellen Feldman (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: The same general topic from a different angle.
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Inglês (171)  Holandês (4)  Espanhol (4)  Alemão (2)  Hebraico (1)  Norueguês (1)  Catalão (1)  Francês (1)  Dinamarquês (1)  Todas as línguas (186)
Mostrando 1-5 de 186 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I feel like I’ve been screwed over twice. First by the publisher, for advertising this as a spy story, and then by the author, for the way he wrote this entire fucking book. Seriously, want to know what Ian McEwan thinks of you, his reader? Especially if you happen to be a lady reader? Read Sweet Tooth right to the fucking end and find out.

Serena Frome (rhymes with “plume,â€ù as she tells us) is the smart, beautiful daughter of an Anglican bishop. Raised in a loving family, she has been spared from the greater excesses of the sixties. When it is time for Serena to go to college, her mother pressures her to study mathematics at Cambridge, saying it is her “duty as a woman.â€ù Although Serena would rather study English, she complies with her mother’s wishes, only to find that she is not as brilliant at math as everyone thought.

Serena takes her mind off her shortcomings by going back to her first love: books. She is a delightfully unsnobbish reader, insisting to her friends that Valley of the Dolls is as good as anything by Jane Austen and reading Octopussy and One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich in the same sitting. She doesn’t care for the “tricksâ€ù of postmodernist literature, though. All she wants, Serena explains, are “characters I could believe in . . . Generally, I preferred people falling in and out of love . . . It was vulgar to want it, but I liked someone to say ‘Marry me’ by the end.â€ù Poor, sweet Serena, all your preferences are going to be royally pissed on by the time your story is over.

The works of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn transform Serena into a vehement anti-Communist, a rarity in the university world of the 1970’s. A series of articles she writes for a student magazine catches the eye of middle-aged Tony Canning, a history tutor and former MI5 operative. They have an affair and he begins grooming her for recruitment into MI5. Even after he brusquely ends things between them, Serena continues on the path set out for her and is hired as a “junior assistant officer,â€ù i.e. glorified secretary. Geez, that pesky glass ceiling.

However, thanks to her reputation as a reader, Serena is offered a role in a program codenamed “Sweet Tooth.â€ù MI5 has been secretly funding up-and-coming writers whose work have an anti-Communist slant, and now they want to add a novelist to the list. Serena’s job is to visit Tom Haley (McEwan’s doppelgÃ_nger) and offer him a stipend from a front organization. (That’s it. That’s her entire mission. [a:George Smiley|1411964|John le Carré|https://d.gr-assets.com/authors/1234571122p2/1411964.jpg] this girl ain’t.) Serena is entranced by Tom’s short stories and all too ready to fall in love with their author. As her relationship with Tom grows more and more serious, Serena agonizes over telling him the truth, knowing he would probably reject both the money and her.

While reading, I never went, “Oh man, it’s gonna be so bad when Tom finds out!â€ù I didn’t feel any real tension. Serena visits Tom, they have sex, they get drunk, they have more sex, she feels guilty about not telling him, she goes home. Repeat ad nauseum. And maybe I am a horrible person, but I thought the sense of underhandedness was blown way out of proportion. Serena never lied about her feelings for Tom. She doesn’t try to influence what he writes. She doesn’t try to censor him. She just offered him money that he was under no obligation to accept.

I also had a problem with the way Serena is treated by male characters, and even the author himself. She has terrible taste in men. They are unavailable (gay, engaged, married) or not very nice (manipulative, vindictive, self-absorbed). Sometimes both. And while I liked Serena’s voice – she is wonderfully dry – everything that happens to her happens because (1) she is pretty and (2) she likes to read. (Why do male authors have this idea that a girl is remarkable if she is pretty and likes to read? Bonus points if she likes to have sex.) And the ending is just this true Ian McEwan plot twist™ that made me want to chuck the book out the goddamn window. ( )
1 vote doryfish | Aug 20, 2021 |
Great storytelling, but Ian, darling, enough with the post-modern twists already. Why not just trust and enjoy the power of a good story well told...? ( )
  wordloversf | Aug 14, 2021 |
Yah, no. Couldn't get into it.
  Jinjer | Jul 19, 2021 |
I know Ian McEwan is capable of great things, but this makes him seem a bit of a one-trick pony. What was both clever and powerful in Atonement here is just a clever trick, and one he's already used. Plus I didn't find the subject or the characters anywhere near as interesting as other McEwan novels I've read. Still, I've got to grant him its cleverness. ( )
  Charon07 | Jul 16, 2021 |
I wish I had Serena's talent of speed reading. I found the background story of MI5-6 not developed enough-i found that part interesting--the book just went on and on and on--- finally picked up in the last 80 pages-good grief--too little too late ( )
  Betsy_Crumley | Jan 28, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 186 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A satisfying spy novel with a literary twist provides both surprises and sly references to McEwan's early work
adicionada por Nickelini | editarthe Guardian, Justin Cartwright (Jun 3, 2013)
 
Ian McEwan has never been a spy (or, if he has, that fact remains classified), but of today's novelists he may be the most uniquely suited to the profession. He has a scientific, technical mind drawn to structural ploys and complicated scene engineering. . . . Mr. McEwan likes manipulating readers as much as plots. . . . Ultimately, like his bloodless previous novel, Solar (2010), there is little point to Sweet Tooth beyond Mr. McEwan's low-level authorial deceptions. . . . The book is soon overwhelmed by its own narrative ruse, which revealed in the final pages, is clever but not meaningful.
adicionada por sgump | editarWall Street Journal, Sam Sacks (Nov 13, 2012)
 
In playing these mirror games, Mr. McEwan seems to want to make the reader think about the lines between life and art, and the similarities between spying and writing. He also seems to want to make us reconsider the assumptions we make when we read a work of fiction. As usual his prose is effortlessly seductive. And he does a nimble job too of conjuring London in the 1970s — with its economic woes, worries about I.R.A. bombings and uneasy assimilation of the countercultural changes of the ’60s. These aspects of “Sweet Tooth” keep the reader trucking on through the novel, but alas they’re insufficient compensation for the story’s self-conscious contrivance and foreseeable conclusion.
adicionada por ozzer | editarNew York Times, MICHIKO KAKUTANI (Oct 4, 2012)
 
The combination of all these nose-tapping hints suggests to the alert reader that there’s something clever-clever coming along at the end, which makes it feel even more like a gimmick. I won’t spoil things if you’re going to read the book, but just remember that one of the central characters is a novelist. OK?
adicionada por TimFootman | editarCultural Snow, Tim Footman (Sep 2, 2012)
 
But Sweet Tooth – which has been misleadingly hyped as a thriller – is a different kind of work altogether. It’s McEwan’s version of metafiction, his exploration of what it could mean to write a postmodern-realist novel for a wide (mainstream and literary) readership. It’s also rather biographical. . . . . but this novel could be seen as his way of reaching beyond the easy labels without abandoning the style his readers love. He’s intelligent, has popular and literary appeal, manages credibly and interestingly to include politics in his writing, and has a gift for making an enormous range of readers feel as though he is writing about them, about their own particular life of the mind. He observes the tiny tragedies of growing up and growing old with humour and insight.
adicionada por Nickelini | editarthe Globe and Mail, IT Sutcliffe (Aug 31, 2012)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (5 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Ian McEwanautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Balmelli, MauriziaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Camus-Pichon, FranceTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stevenson, JulietNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Verhoef, RienTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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If only I had met, on this search, a single clearly evil person.
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Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Recruited into MI5 against a backdrop of the Cold War in 1972, Cambridge student Serena Frome, a compulsive reader, is assigned to infiltrate the literary circle of a promising young writer whose politics align with those of the government, a situation that is compromised when she falls in love with him.

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