Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Un Lun Dun por China Mieville
A carregar...

Un Lun Dun (edição 2011)

por China Mieville (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
3,1851813,092 (3.82)1 / 430
Stumbling into an alternate funhouse version of her home city, twelve-year-old Londoner Deeba finds herself trapped in a world of killer giraffes, animated umbrellas, and ghost children, and must take on the role of savior to prevent utter destruction.
Membro:ildrinn
Título:Un Lun Dun
Autores:China Mieville (Autor)
Informação:Pan (2011), Edition: Reprints, 528 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Un Lun Dun por China Miéville

Adicionado recentemente porpbeagan, SONYAns, rloks, SeanBoley, FuTzu, MeganWelfare, LadyDita, Jmeazp, wishanem, biblioteca privada
  1. 170
    Neverwhere por Neil Gaiman (Phantasma, ahstrick, jolerie)
  2. 90
    The Phantom Tollbooth por Norton Juster (Phantasma, elbakerone, heidialice)
  3. 51
    The City & The City por China Miéville (heidialice)
    heidialice: May be an obvious recommendation, but these books cover a similar (very original) premise in very different ways. Un Lun Dun is for young teens, smaller in scope and message-heavy; The City & The City for adults, deals with complex themes and offers no easy answers. Both display Mieville's consummate skills and elegant humor.… (mais)
  4. 40
    The City of Dreaming Books por Walter Moers (Scorbet)
  5. 52
    The Graveyard Book por Neil Gaiman (heidialice)
    heidialice: Both are fantastical YA at its best. Gaiman is an acknowledged inspiration for Mieville, and it shows, though he has his own distinctive style and voice.
  6. 30
    The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Ship of Her Own Making por Catherynne M. Valente (foggidawn, lottpoet)
  7. 31
    The Well of Lost Plots por Jasper Fforde (melonbrawl)
    melonbrawl: Similar wordplay and meta-textual playfulness
  8. 00
    The Child Thief por Brom (GirlMisanthrope)
    GirlMisanthrope: A story inspired by/reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland. Has similar break-neck adventure and constant twists. And great artwork by the author.
  9. 00
    The Undrowned Child por Michelle Lovric (Rubbah)
  10. 12
    Summerland por Michael Chabon (anglemark)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

» Ver também 430 menções

Inglês (178)  Checo (1)  Francês (1)  Todas as línguas (180)
Mostrando 1-5 de 180 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Clearly aimed at the young adult market and therefore not having the depth and scope of the New Crozubon novels - this is still unmistakably Mieville and therefore brilliantly imaginative inventive and enjoyable. Flying London buses with conductors who can really conduct electricity, Ninja Dustbins and a character who is an old fashioned diving suit filled with various forms of sealife. Echoes of Lewis Carroll with syntax, grammer and wordplay becoming integral to the development of the plot. Room for a sequel or 2 based on the ending as well. ( )
  MattCotton | Dec 4, 2020 |
Un Lun Dun by China Mieville It took me a while to work that this was not an adults book. I think it may be described by that universal put down as a Young Adults book.
 
Funny how we don't have Old Adults Books?
 
But by that time I was into it. A story about parallel worlds, friendship, loyalty and destiny.
 
Very readable and at 260 pages easy too. I loved it. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
THIS BOOK IS BIZARRE AND FANTASTIC ( )
  ibazel | Aug 7, 2020 |
I am not sure what to make of this book or its author.
Considerable time is spent attacking cliches of the fantasy genre, yet Mieville's Unlondon is acknowledged as derivative of Gaiman's Neverwhere. Isn't being obviously derivative of your predecessors both a cliche and the worst crime of the fantasy genre? (I give credit for open admission of the debt, though.)

One of the cliches attacked is that of the the Protagonist with a Heroic Destiny (PHD). Fairy Nuff, but you can see the attack coming from about page 5 and what form it is going to take: a Protagonist Switch (PS). Now for me, at least, the PS is a far worse literary crime than dragging out the PHD one more time. An author can only get away with a PS in a Greek Tragedy (or likeness there-of e.g. Shakespeare's Julius Caesar). Un Lun Dun is not a Greek Tragedy - the Initial Protagonist doesn't die horribly.

There are all sorts of daft elements in the book, such as the Unbrellas that are created when umbrellas are broken or the pet milk carton so it would be tempting to catagorise the book as a spoof on the fantasy genre - but spoofs at least try to be continually funny. Un Lun Dun does not; there are funny incidents and funny puns (Binjas?!) but the humour is sporadic - so this is not Terry Pratchett's Disc World, either. Much of the time it wants to be a straightforward fantasy adventure. Eoin Colfer and Partick Landy have successfully created imaginative, humourous fantasies that are also gripping - but they have a uniform tone - this does not. It's not really comic relief, either - it's just random switches of mood.

It's difficult to accept an author tacitly criticising his peers' use of cliche when he can't manage proper plot construction and use of tone to match situation and intensify reader involvement. Mieville has tremendous imaginative invention but he is not in control of his art. ( )
  Arbieroo | Jul 17, 2020 |
I'm not certain what I think about the novel, but a few things should be pointed out. There were clever aspects and the writing was clear and obviously aimed at kids. The debt to Gaiman was obvious, but so was the debt to Michael Ende. The word-play drove the narrative, but more importantly, it drove the plot. In some ways, it was clever and interesting, but I was left wanting something else. I couldn't believe how much the novel was about umbrellas, unbrellas, and rebrellas. I suppose my main complaint was with the wrap up of the smog. Yes, yes, clever and all, but then again, not so clever. After sitting on it and letting it digest in my head, it just felt cheap.

That's not to say the book it not worthwhile, because it is. It was very cute and follows a very long tradition of YA novels that bring the little awkward girls into full blown heroines. I've read much much much worse YA novels, so I suppose my harshness is there in direct response to how much I did enjoy the beginning and middle parts and sat wondering how a resolution would come that didn't seem ultimately contrived.

In all, I did enjoy it, but I know I could have enjoyed it much more.
( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 180 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This is Miéville’s first book for younger readers. It is also copiously (and well) illustrated by the author. In it Zanna and Deeba, two of a group of normal young teenagers in London, are beset by strange occurrences. They are attacked by smoke tendrils, freaked out by an ambulatory umbrella and Zanna is addressed as Shwazzy several times during different chance encounters in one of which she is given a card naming her as such.

Soon they are both transported to a strange place where the sun is too large - and doughnut shaped - weird and colourful characters abound and telecommunications work through the medium of what can only be described as carrier wasps. Zanna is revealed as the choisi - chosen – the girl who will save the abcity of Un Lun Dun (unLondon) from the menace of the Smog. She is presumed to know the details of the Armets and their secret weapon the Klinneract which saved real London and drove the Smog to Un Lun Dun. (This parallel existence also contains other abcities such as Parisn’t, Lost Angeles, Sans Francisco and Hong Gone.)

The book which contains the Shwazzy prophecy - and which speaks morosely a la Eeyore or Marvin - turns out to be wrong, though, and Zanna is unable to help. She is incapacitated by the Smog whose attack is only driven off by using specially slit and treated unbrellas made by Mister Brokkenbroll to ward off the smog’s projectiles. With this apparent victory Deeba and the still far from well Zanna return to London. But Deeba cannot forget her experiences, realises that not all may be well in Un Lun Dun and so makes her return. On her quest to find a weapon to defeat the Smog she is accompanied by the aforementioned Book of Prophecy, Bling, a silver furred locust, Diss, a brown bear cub, a four-armed, four-legged, many-eyed man called Cauldron, a half-ghost, half-normal boy called Hemi, and Curdle, an animated milk carton Deeba adopts as a pet.

There are some nice coinages - mostly portmanteau words like smombies, Propheseers and smoglodytes. Mister Brokkenbroll - the Unbrellissimo - is a particularly redolent case. There are also glazed, wooden framed, eight legged things called Black Windows. These are just a few examples of Miéville's playful linguistic invention.

There is more than a hint of Alice in Un Lun Dun though generally Through The Looking Glass rather than Adventures In Wonderland. This is underlined on page 296 when the Speaker of Talklands echoes Humpy Dumpty by saying, “WORDS MEAN WHATEVER I WANT.” We also have a pair of Tweedledum/Tweedledee-ish mitre-wearing clerics, in white and deep red robes respectively, who only move in zig-zags. There are parallels too with THE CITY & YTIC EHT Miéville’s recent adult novel.


Un Lun Dun is an enjoyable romp. For its target audience I would have thought it might be more than a touch too long, though its young readers may welcome a long immersion in Miéville’s skewed world.
adicionada por jackdeighton | editarA Son Of The Rock, Jack Deighton
 

» Adicionar outros autores (3 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
China Miévilleautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Hall, AugustArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Rosson, ChristopheTraductionautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Oscar
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In an unremarkable room, in a nondescript building, a man sat working on very non-nondescript theories.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

Stumbling into an alternate funhouse version of her home city, twelve-year-old Londoner Deeba finds herself trapped in a world of killer giraffes, animated umbrellas, and ghost children, and must take on the role of savior to prevent utter destruction.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.82)
0.5
1 11
1.5 3
2 41
2.5 18
3 187
3.5 90
4 305
4.5 62
5 191

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 158,999,241 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível