Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Storm Lord por Tanith Lee
A carregar...

The Storm Lord (original 1976; edição 1984)

por Tanith Lee

Séries: The Wars of Vis (1)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
368552,855 (3.02)7
A recognized master fantasist, Tanith Lee has won multiple awards for her craft, including the British Fantasy Award, the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, and the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement in Horror. In the land of Dorthar, the Storm Lord reigns as king. According to law, the Storm Lord's youngest son will be the rightful heir. His queen, the cunning and ambitious Val Mara, intends her young son, Amrek, to be that heir. But fate has other ideas. When the Storm Lord abducts a Lowlander priestess, conceives a child with her, and then dies in mysterious circumstances, the unborn baby of that union suddenly becomes the heir to a vast kingdom--a situation that Val Mara is eager to rectify. When his mother also dies, the infant, Raldnor, must be taken far from the Storm Lord's stronghold to escape the queen's murderous wrath, forsaking all knowledge of his royal heritage. Raldnor grows up among the people of the Plains, but he is set apart from his friends and neighbors by the mystery of his past. Meanwhile, Amrek has taken the throne as his mother intended. If Raldnor is to reclaim his destiny and defeat the usurper who has taken his place, he will have to survive trials of strength, political sabotage, and threats against his life, regaining his birthright as the true Storm Lord of Dorthar.… (mais)
Membro:ildrinn
Título:The Storm Lord
Autores:Tanith Lee
Informação:Orbit (1984), Paperback
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:****
Etiquetas:fantasy

Pormenores da obra

The Storm Lord por Tanith Lee (1976)

Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 7 menções

Mostrando 5 de 5
Read. ( )
  sasameyuki | Aug 11, 2020 |
This review and others posted over at my blog.

I don’t even know how to blurb this book because my eyes were so glazed over by the end that I had no clue what was going on. I was interested, at first, in the world building and the plot. However, the bland characters and convoluted political and religious intrigues lost me by the end.

Raldnor, the lead character, is totally unlikable. But not in the anti-hero way; he’s just an entitled prick. All the women in this book are either evil, sexual objects, or a mix of both. This was surprising coming from Tanith! I’ve encountered this often in vintage sci-fi, but usually from men. It was disappointing to find the stereotypes hold true from a female writer. There are three main love interests for Raldnor, plus a wicked queen type and they’re all basically just sex toys for the men in their lives. There’s rape early on, which seemed like it was there solely for shock-value. The main love interest for Raldnor, Astaris, is literally just beautiful. She has no personality and I’m not sure how they fell in love. In the end (minor spoiler alert!) she actually turns into a statue and there’s no difference between that and when she was alive.

Something compelled me to keep reading, but I’m not sure what. Raldnor succeeds in everything he does and has no likable traits. There’s a really long sea journey and battle and political coup that did nothing for me and I think could have been cut. There’s a weird star that comes around every so often (Zastis, or something) and it makes some of the people of the world really horny? I didn’t see the point of that either. Oh and also the “repressed” and downtrodden race were a people with light skin and bleach blonde hair (despite living in what seemed like a desert or grasslands, so I’d think they’d be tanned) and those in power were “dark skinned” with black hair. I assume Tanith was trying to switch things on their head but it didn’t feel progressive or empowering – especially because the white race takes control of the land in the end.

I kept thinking things would get better or Raldnor would develop some personality traits other than “strong, sexy man” and “chosen one.” I mean, his mother worshipped a snake goddess (who I thought was going to actually appear as a living being in the story and sadly didn’t) and killed his father with some sort of secret sex trick. I expected something cool or intriguing, but the book didn’t deliver. ( )
1 vote MillieHennessy | Feb 10, 2019 |
I vastly enjoy this fantasy. It is the apogee of Tanith Lee, in my opinion, and is the perfect blend of romance and intrigue with adequate violence thrown in. The world creation is a little weak, but it takes a reread before this reader recognized that was so sketchy. So it's a marvellous entertainment, and I regret the book is apparently little known. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Jul 7, 2015 |
This sword-and-sorcery novel from early in Tanith Lee's oeuvre is epic in every sense of the word, occupying a sort of strange space between classical tragedy and fairy tale, but closer to the former than the latter. It has far more in common with Robert E. Howard's Hyborian tales than with The Lord of the Rings or Dunsany's fantasies. The characters are all human (although with powers sometimes surpassing the humans of our disenchanted world), and the trivially exotic nature of the fauna (equestrians ride "zeebas") may be a function of an extraterrestrial setting: "The city lay on the foothills ... her ancestry a charred place where the Storm gods had come out of heaven, riding in the bellies of pale dragons" (21).

There are numerous human races, of which the most important to the story are the Vis -- the dominating race of the empire ruled by the Storm Lord who supplies the book with its title -- and the "lowlanders." These latter are serfs, hereditary worshipers of a serpent goddess, telepathic, and pale where the Vis are dark. The Storm Lord holds his office by birthright under a rule of ultimogeniture, which succession gives the book its initial layer of plot, but there are many others besides.

There is, in fact, a particular Howard story that I think merits comparison to The Storm Lord. It is the excellent "A Witch Shall Be Born," with its royal intrigue, biblical resonances, and the way that it elegantly telescopes what could be the plot of a hefty novel into twenty-odd pages. Just so, The Storm Lord has enough plot for four or five novels, but it doesn't feel rushed, just very full. Lee wrote two more books in "The Wars of Vis" to further detail the history of this particular world, and they must be worth reading, if they are half as good as this one.
4 vote paradoxosalpha | Jul 5, 2015 |
If the cover didn't tip me off, the first part of the book sealed the deal: this is not a feminist tome. :) A priestess is abducted, raped, and killed soon after she gives birth to the king's son. The queen demands that the son be killed to secure her new baby's ascenscion to the throne, but the priestess manages to convince a maid to steal away with the baby, after cutting off his little finger to give to the queen. There's a lot of racism in the world, with the priestess's blonde pale people subjugated by the royal house of dark haired and skinned people. The son in hiding has light hair and dark skin and can't do the mind to mind speaking of his peers in the enslaved race, and he has to disguise himself to advance, and eventually confront the machinations of the royal house. Murder, backstabbing, treason, and women passed around as baby making machines all make this a grim read. But it's well written and epic and only relies on coincidence a few times. ( )
1 vote silentq | Oct 5, 2009 |
Mostrando 5 de 5
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (2 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Tanith Leeautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
D'Achille,GinoArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Ewyck, Annemarie vanTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Jones, Peterautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
SanjulianArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Belongs to Series

Belongs to Publisher Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em holandês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

A recognized master fantasist, Tanith Lee has won multiple awards for her craft, including the British Fantasy Award, the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement, and the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement in Horror. In the land of Dorthar, the Storm Lord reigns as king. According to law, the Storm Lord's youngest son will be the rightful heir. His queen, the cunning and ambitious Val Mara, intends her young son, Amrek, to be that heir. But fate has other ideas. When the Storm Lord abducts a Lowlander priestess, conceives a child with her, and then dies in mysterious circumstances, the unborn baby of that union suddenly becomes the heir to a vast kingdom--a situation that Val Mara is eager to rectify. When his mother also dies, the infant, Raldnor, must be taken far from the Storm Lord's stronghold to escape the queen's murderous wrath, forsaking all knowledge of his royal heritage. Raldnor grows up among the people of the Plains, but he is set apart from his friends and neighbors by the mystery of his past. Meanwhile, Amrek has taken the throne as his mother intended. If Raldnor is to reclaim his destiny and defeat the usurper who has taken his place, he will have to survive trials of strength, political sabotage, and threats against his life, regaining his birthright as the true Storm Lord of Dorthar.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.02)
0.5 1
1 1
1.5 1
2 6
2.5
3 22
3.5 2
4 10
4.5
5 1

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 159,026,259 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível