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Frog: A Novel por Mo Yan
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Frog: A Novel (edição 2016)

por Mo Yan (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
2431683,658 (3.56)8
" The author of Red Sorghum and China's most revered and controversial novelist returns with his first major publication since winning the Nobel Prize. In 2012, the Nobel committee confirmed Mo Yan's position as one of the greatest and most important writers of our time. In his much-anticipated new novel, Mo Yan chronicles the sweeping history of modern China through the lens of the nation's controversial one- child policy. Frog opens with a playwright nicknamed Tadpole who plans to write about his aunt. In her youth, Gugu-the beautiful daughter of a famous doctor and staunch Communist-is revered for her skill as a midwife. But when her lover defects, Gugu's own loyalty to the Party is questioned. She decides to prove her allegiance by strictly enforcing the one-child policy, keeping tabs on the number of children in the village, and performing abortions on women as many as eight months pregnant. In sharply personal prose, Mo Yan depicts a world of desperate families, illegal surrogates, forced abortions, and the guilt of those who must enforce the policy. At once illuminating and devastating, it shines a light into the heart of communist China. "--… (mais)
Membro:Dunaganagain
Título:Frog: A Novel
Autores:Mo Yan (Autor)
Informação:Penguin Books (2016), Edition: Reprint, 400 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

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Frog por Mo Yan

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» Ver também 8 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A sucker-punch to the stomach. I croaked. A 50-year history of China's single child policy that carefully critiques pride, greed and feminism and left me sad, and curious. ( )
  ephemeral_future | Aug 20, 2020 |
It was OK for a while, ho hum, some interesting bits to keep it afloat, mildly interesting Chinese village life, cultural revolution bits and pieces...

... and then, all of a sudden I was so bored with it that I couldn't stand any more. I read half of it, but there's nothing special in it.

( )
  GirlMeetsTractor | Mar 22, 2020 |
Dit moet één van de eerste Chinese romans zijn waar ik mijn tanden in zet. Dus het is even wennen aan de stijl en de sfeer. Maar al vlug is duidelijk dat Mo Yan een rasverteller is die niet op een pagina meer of minder kijkt om zijn verhaal, of beter, zijn verhalen te brengen. De rode draad is de éénkindpolitiek die de Communistische Partij in de tweede helft van de jaren ’60 invoerde om de bevolkingsexplosie te beteugelen. Aan de hand van concrete personages maakt Yan duidelijk tot welk een menselijke drama’s dit leidde. Niet dat hij daarmee ongezouten kritiek op het regime levert, integendeel, Yan geeft ook duidelijk aan hoe noodzakelijk die bevolkingspolitiek was. Het knappe is dat de auteur geen ééndimensionele figuren ten tonele voert: het centrale personage, de tante-gynecologe, heeft zowel goede als slechte kanten en worstelt op het einde van haar leven heel erg met wat ze gedaan heeft. Ook mooi is hoe de auteur via verschillende tijdsperioden illustreert in welke mate China veranderd is: het boek begint op het achterlijke platteland in de jaren 1950 en eindigt bij het begin van de 21ste eeuw, wanneer dat platteland volop verstedelijkt is en welstand en corruptie volop hun intrede hebben gedaan.
Bij veel lezers wekt het slothoofdstuk, met een heel chaotisch verlopend toneelstuk, veel bevreemding. Het schijnt dat dit een eerder klassieke, Chinese stijlfiguur is, en ik vind dat het wel werkt. Deze roman heeft me niet van mijn sokken geblazen, maar het was wel een aangename kennismaking. ( )
  bookomaniac | Feb 11, 2018 |
In seinem Buch erzählt der Nobelpreisträger von der Frauenärztin Gugu. Zwar ist sie für zehntausend Geburten verantwortlich, aber auch für über 2000 Abtreibungen, die die Einkindpolitik Chinas aufs härteste durchsetzt. Gugu ist eine fanatische Anhängerin der chinesischen Politik, auch Frauen im fünften und siebten Monat treibt sie die Kinder noch ab, jagt sie unerbittlich und gnadenlos. Der Ich-Erzähler, dessen Tante Gugu ist und der die Geschichte in einem Briefwechsel an den japanischen Schriftsteller erzählt, versucht bis zum Ende einen versöhnlichen Ton einzuschlagen. Es ist durchaus interessant gemacht, wie immer wieder die gleichen Figuren verwickelt werden, absurd und bestürzend zugleich.
Mir hat das Buch sehr gut gefallen, da es ein Kapitel der chinesischen Geschichte sehr detailliert aufzeigt. Man kann gut folgen, das Buch ist stimmig. Motive und Bilder (etwa die Frösche) sind sinnvoll.
Ich hatte das Hörbuch, das von Gert Heidenreich wirklich absolut genial gelesen ist.
Der Schriftsteller, an den sich der Ich-Erzähler wendet, ist Kenzaburo Oe nachempfunden. Der Ich –Erzähler schreibt gegen Ende, dass sein Brieffreund auch wissen, wie es ist, wenn man sich in Schwierigkeiten für ein Kind entscheidet. Es stimmt, das Oe ein behindertes Kind hat und darüber geschrieben hat. Dieses Buch (Eine persönliche Erfahrung) werde ich nun als nächstes lesen. ( )
  Wassilissa | Aug 10, 2017 |
Gira em torno do controle de natalidade na China e é narrado por um personagem masculino. Surpreende a delicadeza do olhar para esta questão. É também uma oportunidade para acompanhar a evolução social e política deste país. É uma livro razoável / bom, mas por alguma razão fiquei com a sensação de que esperava mais de um autor Premio Nobel. ( )
  Ursula.Wetzel | Jun 2, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Nobel literature laureate Mo Yan, one of the most popular and prolific authors in China, is possibly still best known overseas for his 1987 novel Red Sorghum, and even then mostly for the lavish film of the book which launched the careers of director Zhang Yimou and actress Gong Li.

Nobel winners may subsequently see their even their marginalia reach publication in multiple languages, and their shopping lists become the subject of academic theses. But while Frog first appeared in Chinese three years before Mr. Mo’s 2012 win, its recent arrival in English is no mere exploitation of prize-enhanced international marketability. The novel is a full-length major work with big ideas, and it deals with a highly sensitive topic.

Mo Yan (“no words” or “don’t speak”) is the pen name of Guan Moye, and Frog is set in his favourite location, a fictionalised version of his birthplace in rural Shandong Province. The narrator’s Aunt Gugu, politically perfect daughter of a communist doctor who died in World War Two, trains as her area's first modern midwife, earns respect and admiration for her no-nonsense delivery skills, and is glamorously affianced to a fighter pilot.

He defects to Taiwan, taking his plane and all her political capital with him and as a result she suffers persecution and physical abuse during the Cultural Revolution for her inadvertent connection with the Communist Party’s enemies. Yet her faith in the Party never wavers. She becomes a tough enforcer of its authority, and in particular of its one child policy.

China’s successful modern literature is rarely short on blood, bile, and sudden death, featuring the whiff of the public toilet, the blare of the truck horn, and the brilliance of blood in the gutter after unexpected violence. Mo Yan also gives the reader no quarter. Young mothers die undergoing last-minute abortions at Gugu’s hands, serial fathers are rounded up for compulsory vasectomies, and the neighbours of recalcitrant repeat parents are threatened with the destruction of their property unless they join in persuading heavily pregnant women out of hiding.

---

But as critics both inside and outside China point out, Mr. Mo is now much closer to the government. He holds the post of Vice President of the officially approved Chinese Writers Association and has spoken out publicly in favour of censorship. In 2012 he contributed his own calligraphy to a commemorative edition of Mao’s 1942 Yan’an Talks on Literature and Art, which promoted the Leninist line that authors should write in the language of the working class and solely to promote the aims of the revolution. There are few documents more reviled by Chinese artists, especially at a time when current President Xi Jinping is reviving the same approach.

---

The book is no easy read. But regardless of his politics, admirers of Mr. Mo’s earlier literary offspring are likely to be equally joyful he brought this one to term.
adicionada por peternh | editarThe Wall Street Journal, Peter Neville-Hadley (sítio Web pago) (Mar 19, 2015)
 
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" The author of Red Sorghum and China's most revered and controversial novelist returns with his first major publication since winning the Nobel Prize. In 2012, the Nobel committee confirmed Mo Yan's position as one of the greatest and most important writers of our time. In his much-anticipated new novel, Mo Yan chronicles the sweeping history of modern China through the lens of the nation's controversial one- child policy. Frog opens with a playwright nicknamed Tadpole who plans to write about his aunt. In her youth, Gugu-the beautiful daughter of a famous doctor and staunch Communist-is revered for her skill as a midwife. But when her lover defects, Gugu's own loyalty to the Party is questioned. She decides to prove her allegiance by strictly enforcing the one-child policy, keeping tabs on the number of children in the village, and performing abortions on women as many as eight months pregnant. In sharply personal prose, Mo Yan depicts a world of desperate families, illegal surrogates, forced abortions, and the guilt of those who must enforce the policy. At once illuminating and devastating, it shines a light into the heart of communist China. "--

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