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The Orenda

por Joseph Boyden

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

Séries: Bird Family Trilogy

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,0224520,135 (4.24)291
"History reveals itself when, in the seventeenth century, a Jesuit missionary ventures into the Canadian wilderness in search of converts-the defining moment of first contact between radically different worlds. What unfolds over the next several years is truly epic, constantly illuminating and surprising, sometimes comic, always entrancing and ultimately all too human in its tragic grandeur. Christophe has been in the New World only a year when his native guides abandon him to flee their Iroquois pursuers. A Huron warrior and elder named Bird soon takes him prisoner, along with a young Iroquois girl, Snow Falls, whose family he has just killed, and holds them captive in his massive village. Champlain's Iron People have only recently begun trading with the Huron, who mistrust them as well as this Crow who has now trespassed onto their land; and her people, of course, have become the Huron's greatest enemy. Putting both to death would resolve the issue, but Bird sees Christophe as a potential envoy to those in New France, and Snow Falls as a replacement for his two daughters who were murdered by the Iroquois. The relationships between these three are reshaped again and again as life comes at them relentlessly: a dangerous trading mission, friendly exchanges with allied tribes, shocking victories and defeats in battle, and sicknesses the likes of which no one has ever witnessed. The Orenda traces a story of blood and hope, suspicion and trust, hatred and love, that comes to a head when Jesuit and Huron join together against the stupendous wrath of the Iroquois, when everything that any of them has ever known or believed faces nothing less than annihilation. A saga nearly four hundred years old, it is also timeless and eternal"--… (mais)
  1. 50
    Black Robe por Brian Moore (librorumamans)
    librorumamans: An earlier treatment of the same material, and the book that to some extent Boyden is reacting to.
  2. 30
    Through Black Spruce por Joseph Boyden (ScribbleKey)
  3. 20
    The Diviners por Margaret Laurence (librorumamans)
    librorumamans: Both books, written four decades apart, look at the gulf that divides aboriginal peoples from the Europeans who supplanted them.
  4. 21
    Indian Horse por Richard Wagamese (JenMDB)
  5. 10
    The Last of the Mohicans por James Fenimore Cooper (charlie68)
  6. 22
    Three Day Road por Joseph Boyden (JenMDB)
  7. 00
    Born With A Tooth por Joseph Boyden (ScribbleKey)
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» Ver também 291 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 45 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Historical Fiction
  BooksInMirror | Feb 19, 2024 |
A brilliant read, start to finish. As in real life, the lines between villains and heroes are a bit fuzzy. ( )
  BBrookes | Dec 5, 2023 |
This is a book that all Canadians should read, and it certainly should be included in higher education history curriculums. The book is about our Canadian forbearers. They were not the ancestors of the majority of Canadians, as all of our Canadian non-First Nation ancestors were immigrants. Our ancestors were the ones who built this country into the wonderful country it is today--but at what cost to the first settlers in our land? The story is set in 17 century Canada, and is a prequel to Joseph Boyden's Bird Family trilogy. I had read Three Day Road and Through Black Spruce, so now it was time to see where it all began. The book is a masterpiece, and, in true Joseph Borden style, a sweeping saga of history in a small area of Canada near the American border. It tells the story of Bird and his tribe, who were Hurons, who lived in this area. They were a tribe that were farmers and grew crops to feed their people. Surrounded by many enemy tribes, they had to fight constantly in order to survive. Then, along come the Jesuits from Europe who were sent to these foreign lands by their Pope to civilize and convert these heathen nations. The story is told through the eyes of three narrators - Bird who is the Chief of his Huron nation, his adopted daughter Snow Falls who was an Iroquois captive who Bird adopted as a young girl after he had slaughtered her family in a revenge strike to avenge the death of his wife and daughters, and Christophe, a young French Jesuit who arrives in the region where the Hurons are living, while following the orders of his high level priests to go and live among the "sauvages" as they call these native people, and preach the word of God to them. I listened to this book on audiobook, and it is narrated by Graham Rowan and Edorado Ballerina. I'm not sure that listening to this particular audiobook was a good choice for me because there is a lot of war, killing, torture and other very graphic scenes in the book. Having it read is rather uncomfortable and totally shocking. The narrators did a good job of portraying all of the scenes in the book though. History jumps off the pages though, whether you are reading or listening because of Boyden's writing style. It is like being there and watching everything as it is occurring (but from a safe distance). The final battle scene between the Huron and the Iroquois decimates a nation, but even with that, there is hope at the end when the few surviving Huron people manage to get away, and each survivor then finds his or her own way to survive. I highly recommend this book. It's another winner for one of my favourite Canadian authors. ( )
  Romonko | Apr 7, 2023 |
This book tells the history of interactions among the Huron, Iroquois and Jesuits in Canada during the 1600s. The author relates this history through the perspectives of three main characters, each told in first person, of a young Iroquois female (Snow Falls), a Huron warrior (Bird) and a Jesuit missionary (Christophe). I thought the author did an excellent job of showing how differences in perspective can lead to misunderstandings. I enjoyed the descriptions of the physical beauty of the country and the way in which the people lived. The characters were well-developed, and they evolved over time.

I found the book well-written, engrossing, and educational. I recommend this book to those who enjoy historical fiction, or who want to learn more about Canadian history or the lives of native peoples of North America. WARNING: It is EXTREMELY graphic in describing torture of captives of the warring tribes. It depicts a brutality that will likely be disturbing to many readers. ( )
  Castlelass | Oct 30, 2022 |
This is a beautifully written book with some extremely difficult scenes showing the harsh realities of Canada when Europeans first started to appear. The story depicts the war between Wendat and Haudenosaunee as group tries to manipulate the French and the English, themselves at war and themselves manipulating warring Indigenous nations.
Set in a background of harsh winters, unforgiving draughts and cruel revenges, this story could easily have become a horror boo. Yet, Boyden manages to capture also beauty, love, friendship, forgiveness and hope. Most unlikely alliances between a Jesuit and a Wendat Chief, a beautiful love story between an abducted Haudenosaunee girl and a Wendat boy, an enchanting Anishinaabe sorceress turn the murderous plot into a multifaceted epic tale full of wonder and grit.
Based on historical events, this book is also a great way to learn more about Canada's early history. ( )
  Cecilturtle | Aug 11, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 45 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
I can’t help but see something both haunting and spectacular in the cycle of destruction that Boyden so expertly evokes. The novel is punctuated by acts of unspeakable cruelty and, yes, savagery – human on human, human on animal, and animal on animal. [...] The ritualistic torture of the captured – euphemistically referred to as “caressing” – is orgiastic. Yet there is a meditative, poetic quality to even the most stomach-churning encounters.
[...]
Boyden frames each of the novel’s three parts with short laments written in the collective voice of native people for a time when they had and understood the orenda. This prophetic writing positions Boyden’s novel as both a dream in the spiritual, native sense and a wake-up call in our more alarmist, modern one.
adicionada por monnibo | editarQuill & Quire, Kamal Al-Solaylee (Oct 1, 2013)
 
Within the first few of the nearly 500 pages, it was clear why it was receiving the glowing reviews. But it was also clear I wouldn’t like the book. The Orenda is a comforting narrative for Canadians about the emergence of Canada: Indian savages, do-good Jesuits and the inevitability (even desirability) of colonization. The themes that push this narrative are a portrayal of Haudenosaunee peoples as antagonistic, the privileging of the Jesuit perspective, and a reinforcing of old story-telling tropes about Indigenous people. . . . It's a grim reality and a difficult book to read. At least it will be for many Native peoples. For Canadians, The Orenda is a colonial scribe and moral alibi.
adicionada por Nickelini | editarMuskrat Magazine, Hayden King (Sep 24, 2013)
 
The book's most startling aspect is the way Mr Boyden’s native figures explode the classic image of the “noble savage”. They are rich with humanity, not crude or sanctimonious stereotypes. Whether staving off disease and hunger in a Huron longhouse or taking part in the ritual torture of an Iroquois captive, the characters are vibrantly drawn, with complex inner lives. At the same time, Mr Boyden, who was raised a Catholic, draws a nuanced portrait of the French missionary, who displays remarkable physical courage and acts upon genuine religious belief.
 
In Orenda he borrows much from his background: his education by Jesuits and his interest in his Metis ancestry. He did a lot of research to bring the ancient Huron culture alive. The force and brilliance of his writing allows him to reconstruct how they thought, what their daily life was like, how they survived not only the cold Canadian winters but also the violent conflict with the Iroquois.

The Huron were decimated not only by the Iroquois but also smallpox and other diseases. We are able to understand their grief viscerally because Boyden is such a fine writer, evoking his characters’ emotions in a touching and understandable way.
 
Indeed, the entire novel unfolds like one of the Huron’s mystical visions. We experience their world in such tremendous detail, the result of Boyden’s awesome ability to transmute research into story. We come away with a sense of intimacy and respect for a people....Many readers will comment on the timeliness of this novel, arriving as the Truth and Reconciliation Hearings into the treatment of aboriginals in residential schools is yet unfolding, and as First Nations determine to Idle No More. But the word timeliness is incorrect. It suggests that the work’s relevance will pass and I doubt that very much. The Orenda illuminates the shadowy moment of our inception as a country. It forces us to bravely consider who we are. The Orenda is much more than a timely novel. It is a timeless one; born a classic.
 

» Adicionar outros autores (8 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Joseph Boydenautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Ahn, AliNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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"History reveals itself when, in the seventeenth century, a Jesuit missionary ventures into the Canadian wilderness in search of converts-the defining moment of first contact between radically different worlds. What unfolds over the next several years is truly epic, constantly illuminating and surprising, sometimes comic, always entrancing and ultimately all too human in its tragic grandeur. Christophe has been in the New World only a year when his native guides abandon him to flee their Iroquois pursuers. A Huron warrior and elder named Bird soon takes him prisoner, along with a young Iroquois girl, Snow Falls, whose family he has just killed, and holds them captive in his massive village. Champlain's Iron People have only recently begun trading with the Huron, who mistrust them as well as this Crow who has now trespassed onto their land; and her people, of course, have become the Huron's greatest enemy. Putting both to death would resolve the issue, but Bird sees Christophe as a potential envoy to those in New France, and Snow Falls as a replacement for his two daughters who were murdered by the Iroquois. The relationships between these three are reshaped again and again as life comes at them relentlessly: a dangerous trading mission, friendly exchanges with allied tribes, shocking victories and defeats in battle, and sicknesses the likes of which no one has ever witnessed. The Orenda traces a story of blood and hope, suspicion and trust, hatred and love, that comes to a head when Jesuit and Huron join together against the stupendous wrath of the Iroquois, when everything that any of them has ever known or believed faces nothing less than annihilation. A saga nearly four hundred years old, it is also timeless and eternal"--

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