Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

The Death of Woman Wang (1978)

por Jonathan D. Spence

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
448442,320 (3.42)30
"Spence shows himself at once historian, detective, and artist. . . . He makes history howl." (The New Republic)   Award-winning author Jonathan D. Spence paints a vivid picture of an obscure place and time: provincial China in the seventeenth century. Life in the northeastern county of T'an-ch'eng emerges here as an endless cycle of floods, plagues, crop failures, banditry, and heavy taxation. Against this turbulent background a tenacious tax collector, an irascible farmer, and an unhappy wife act out a poignant drama at whose climax the wife, having run away from her husband, returns to him, only to die at his hands. Magnificently evoking the China of long ago, The Death of Woman Wang also deepens our understanding of the China we know today.… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 30 menções

Mostrando 4 de 4
In college I had to read Spence's God's Chinese Son for a class about religion and rebellion in modern east Asia. I found myself really enjoying the book due to the way Spence intertwines primary sources with his narrative. It was a manner of writing that really made the more detailed historical details pop while not getting inundated in dates and minute specifics.

With this (much) shorter work, he manages to do the same. I picked the book up due to it's powerful title which I think ended up being a great marketing strategy since the primary title is merely an anecdote that comes at the end of the story. In fact, this book is actually about the small town of T'an-ch'eng, in the province of Shantung between the years 1668 and 1672. If I were to re-title the book, it'd be more appropriate to call it "The Tax Codes of T'an-ch'eng, followed by, The Death of Woman Wang and Other Citizens of T'an-ch'eng". I see now why that was not the selected title.

However, it is indeed how the book starts, a whole chapter devoted to how unfortunate the citizens of T'an-ch'eng are as they are cheated by tax codes, pillaging thieves and devastating natural disasters. But it's with this introductory chapter and the second chapter that we realize that T'an-ch'eng is the main character of this story and Spence manages to make it all quite fascinating. Then, interspersed with the tax codes and penal codes of China's 17th century, he inserts little anecdotes of various citizens of the town that are quite interesting.

Although maybe a slow start, the narrative does eventually build up until you're suddenly at the end. So all in all, a great introspective on this little village called T'an-ch'eng. ( )
1 vote lilisin | Mar 6, 2014 |
I read this book on recommendation. I moderately enjoyed it, although it read more as a textbook at times rather than a pleasurable read. It was intriguing, although at times overbearing in the information that was offered. I would only recommend it to readers who are already engrossed with the topic. Not really idle reading. My opinion might be skewed in concerns to this author's book because I was more in the mood for the idea of the book rather then the historically accurate one that it turned out to be. I would however give this author another try at a later date. As I mentioned earlier it was an intriguing read and I'm curious as to the other topics in which the author writes on. ( )
  pagemasterZee | Feb 9, 2013 |
This short book looks at life in during the Qing dynasty in China. It examines local governance and taxation, showing the many ways in which the system was corrupt. More interesting (to me at least) were the laws and social conventions on the role of women, and on crimes of passion and/or revenge. The main story is the book is that of a woman who leaves her husband, and is killed after her return. An easy read, well documented, but a bit dry (until you get to the title story). ( )
  LynnB | May 8, 2012 |
Great little book. Spence looks at a very small area of China during the early Qing empire. He shows the impact of big events, such as mismanagement of the empire, natural disaster and an epidemic of banditry, while not particularly noticing the change between the Ming and Qing dynasties. He paints a picture of what daily life was like, emphasizing relations within communities and women's status.

His sources are particularly interesting. Spence found a journal of a local bureaucrat as well as a written history of the area written only a short time after the events it records. He supplements that with the legal code of the Qing and the writing of a novelist living nearby to emphasize the priorities of the society.

This book is an easy read and very interesting. If you are interesting in life in imperial China, this one is well worth the time. ( )
1 vote Scapegoats | Feb 9, 2008 |
Mostrando 4 de 4
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Lost, is it, buried? One more missing piece?

But nothing's lost. Or else: all is translation
And every bit of us is lost in it...

-- James Merrill
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The earthquake struck T'an-Ch'eng on July 25, 1668.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Spence shows himself at once historian, detective, and artist. . . . He makes history howl." (The New Republic)   Award-winning author Jonathan D. Spence paints a vivid picture of an obscure place and time: provincial China in the seventeenth century. Life in the northeastern county of T'an-ch'eng emerges here as an endless cycle of floods, plagues, crop failures, banditry, and heavy taxation. Against this turbulent background a tenacious tax collector, an irascible farmer, and an unhappy wife act out a poignant drama at whose climax the wife, having run away from her husband, returns to him, only to die at his hands. Magnificently evoking the China of long ago, The Death of Woman Wang also deepens our understanding of the China we know today.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (3.42)
0.5
1 3
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 24
3.5 3
4 21
4.5 2
5 5

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,521,311 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível