Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

Emancipation Day

por Wayne Grady

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
827327,231 (3.53)15
"Grady's novel reads with the velvety tempo of the jazz music of its day. . . . Grady fearlessly explores heated race relations and the masks we all assume." --Chatelaine With his curly black hair and his wicked grin, everyone swoons and thinks of Frank Sinatra when Navy musician Jackson Lewis takes the stage. It's World War II, and while stationed in St. John's, Newfoundland, Jack meets the well-heeled Vivian Clift, a local girl who has never stepped off the Rock and longs to see the world. They marry against Vivian's family's wishes--there's something about Jack that they just don't like--and as the war draws to a close, the couple travels to Windsor to meet Jack's family. But when Vivian meets Jack's mother and brother, everything she thought she knew about her husband gets called into question. They don't live in the dream home Jack depicted, they all look different from one another--different from anyone Vivian has ever seen--and after weeks of waiting to meet Jack's father, he never materializes. Steeped in jazz and big-band music, spanning pre- and post-war Windsor-Detroit, St. John's, Newfoundland, and 1950s Toronto, this is an arresting, heartwrenching novel about fathers and sons, love and sacrifice, race relations and a time in our history when the world was on the cusp of momentous change.… (mais)
Nenhum(a)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 15 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Jack Lewis is from Windsor, Ontario, a border town across the St. Clair river from Detroit, Michigan. Borders are regularly crossed in Windsor — over to Detroit to partake of the jazz clubs and from The Settlement over to the whiter parts of town. Jack’s real name is Jackson. That’s what his mother calls him. His father, William Henry, hardly knows what to call him, a boy so light he might just be white. And white is just what Jack thinks of himself as. So much so that he spends a fair portion of his self-narrative in a losing game of white washing. But how can he white wash his father? He can’t. So he’s got to go where no one has any inkling of the mixing that occurs, sometimes, in Windsor. Newfoundland.

In Newfoundland, during WWII, Jack takes up with Vivian. She loves him for his charm, his good looks (like Frank Sinatra), and for his music (he sings and plays trombone in a band). Vivian isn’t entirely certain Jack is all that he says he is, or rather isn’t, since he is not forthcoming about his origins. But she loves him enough to marry him anyway. Once the war ends, the navy sends Jack and Vivian back to Jack’s home town. Surely Vivian is due for a bit of eye opening. But will Jack’s own eyes and heart be opened as well?

This first novel had a long gestation. Some of that shows in how well-honed parts of it are. Some of it shows in a disjointedness in the narrative, as though disparate narrative tranches have been stitched together. Some of it shows in periodic heavy-handedness. Well, it’s a first novel and maybe that can be expected. Of course for many the relationship between the story and author’s personal history will supersede any consideration of the novel as fiction. But perhaps a work of non-fiction would have been more satisfying in that case. ( )
  RandyMetcalfe | Sep 13, 2017 |
I live in the city this book was set; I knew very little of the history it tells. I learned so much - a history lesson.I enjoyed this unique story. I never had any doubt about my heritage, now I see the dilemma of not understanding who you are and not embracing your heritage and the self doubt it can create. ( )
  JFMC | Apr 4, 2015 |
This just didn't do it for me. I don't know if it was because I felt like there wasn't anything in the story I could relate to or if I just found the characters unlikeable... But not my cup of tea. In fact, I'm not entirely sure why I'm even keeping it.... ( )
  janeycanuck | Nov 10, 2014 |
This was a book that was recommended to me, and when I read that it was set around WWII and steeped in the jazz and be bop movement that was popular at that time, I just couldn't resist it. When I found out that it was also a book that made the 2013 Giller prize long list and was nominated a Globe and Mail Best Book, I knew I had to read it. The book is about much more than WWII and the big band and jazz era. It is a book about families, and father and son relationships. It's a book about Canada and how we differ from our neighbours to the south. But the more we're different from them, the more we are the same it appears. I did not realize that Canada had it's own civil rights movement even one hundred odd years after the American war between the States and Emancipation Day. Even today there are many people living in Canada who deal with race and cultural issues on a daily basis. We have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go to achieve true equality in this country. This book shows us the anguish of children and people trying to fit in, through the eyes of one little boy. This little boy is 18 when the story opens, but in flashbacks we see this confused little boy as he grew up in Windsor, Ontario. We see his anguish as he determines that he has to escape his family and home life in order to find a place where he might finally feel like he belonged. We see the family that he leaves behind as they struggle to come to terms with the needs of this their youngest child. A young girl from Newfoundland is drawn into this family drama because she meets and falls in love with Jack. When she goes with Jack to visit his family home in Windsor, Vivian comes face to face with a Jack she never knew existed. Her life is forever changed, and she must find the strength to deal with the new reality that has come to her life. This is a book that definitely made me stop and think. I enjoyed it very much. ( )
  Romonko | Oct 28, 2014 |
This ensemble narrated book, based in the 40s and 50s really hit something inside of me, surprising me and pulling me in. Each character, given their own narrative had their own unique point of view of events that happened, giving a full fleshed out picture of what happens when someone might not be willing to accept who they are. It reflects the length we go to as people, to possibly escape our pasts, but inevitably some pieces of it end up engrained in our future.

It is easy to tell that this book, in some ways is autobiographical, and it is so well written that all of the characters become people to sympathize with. Whether it’s Jack, who really is a little boy lost, not matter what decisions he tries to make. Or Vivian who is so naive and yet one of the warmer characters in the novel. William Henry was the one who I felt the most sympathy for, as he made wrong decisions, left and right and didn’t quite know what to make of his son until it was far too late.

It was also a good, albeit sad reflection of racial relations in both the U.S and Canada which really fleshed out the realism in the book.

This book also made me fall in love with it because it is a Canadian novel, with settings so close to me, and the area I live in. It was simply a well written, well woven tale.

Good for:

Those who love a good historical book with a strong basis in reality. ( )
  acanuckreader | May 20, 2014 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 7 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Whether the last page, with its climactic, revelatory outburst, successfully resolves the novel’s conflicts is another question. Book club members will doubtless debate it at length. I’m disinclined to accept this ending, but willing to admit that it does no great harm to the novel even if it’s not adequate to the job....But if Grady has an uncertain hand with characterization, his years of literary labours aside from the novel — he is the author of 14 non-fiction books and translator of 15 novels — have borne fruit in a highly compact and readable narrative.....There is no doubt Grady has tackled a powerful theme....
 
In his acknowledgements, Grady writes that he initially attempted to write a sweeping family saga covering 200 years and five generations, until he was talked out of it. I wish he hadn’t been. While it took me a while to warm up to the moody, surly character of Jack, I quickly took to his troubled black father, as well as to Jack’s white lover, and I was reluctant to let them go when the book ended.

Those (myself included) whose genealogy searches have turned up racially different ancestors may be surprised at how this novel’s profound theme of racial identity dredges up feelings that are more than skin deep.
 
Ultimately, Grady has taken a very personal story and created a typical family drama – incorporating intergenerational tension, questions of identity and belonging, disappointment in relationships, and a lack of understanding and acceptance – rescued from its imperfections by his insouciant prose. - See more at: http://www.quillandquire.com/reviews/...
 
Grady does a thorough job of parsing Canadian race relations, though times his story is too simplistic. Emancipation Day joins a huge body of work from the United States and Caribbean about post-slavery identity and shadeism. Sometimes, the volume of those narratives can restrict discussion of race and racism to dichotomies of black and white.... Even with its missteps, Emancipation Day is an engaging look at when and where true co-existence and polite tolerance dissolve into prejudice and power struggle. That’s a fully contemporary issue, and one that’s entirely Canadian.
 
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To my parents, Albert and Zoë Grady:
Requiescatis in pace.
And, always, to Merilyn
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
William Henry Lewis, of W. H. Lewis & Sons, Ltd., Plasterers, Willie to his wife, Will to his brother and friends, the Old Man to his sons, Pop to his daughter, William Henry to his mama who was living in Ypsilanti or Cassopolis, no one was certain where or even if she was still alive, she'd be in her nineties, and also William Henry to himself, sat regally in his father's ancient barber chair, his hands spread across his knees under the blue pinstriped barber's bib, and watched himself in the large wall mirror while his brother, Harlan, shaved his chin.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
(Carregue para mostrar. Atenção: Pode conter revelações sobre o enredo.)
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Grady's novel reads with the velvety tempo of the jazz music of its day. . . . Grady fearlessly explores heated race relations and the masks we all assume." --Chatelaine With his curly black hair and his wicked grin, everyone swoons and thinks of Frank Sinatra when Navy musician Jackson Lewis takes the stage. It's World War II, and while stationed in St. John's, Newfoundland, Jack meets the well-heeled Vivian Clift, a local girl who has never stepped off the Rock and longs to see the world. They marry against Vivian's family's wishes--there's something about Jack that they just don't like--and as the war draws to a close, the couple travels to Windsor to meet Jack's family. But when Vivian meets Jack's mother and brother, everything she thought she knew about her husband gets called into question. They don't live in the dream home Jack depicted, they all look different from one another--different from anyone Vivian has ever seen--and after weeks of waiting to meet Jack's father, he never materializes. Steeped in jazz and big-band music, spanning pre- and post-war Windsor-Detroit, St. John's, Newfoundland, and 1950s Toronto, this is an arresting, heartwrenching novel about fathers and sons, love and sacrifice, race relations and a time in our history when the world was on the cusp of momentous change.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.53)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 6
3.5 4
4 5
4.5 1
5 2

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,784,725 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível