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The First Forty-Nine Stories (1938)

por Ernest Hemingway

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Forty-nine stories reflect much of the intensity of Hemingway's own life and environment.
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I took a long time reading through this one, studying Hemingway's style. Not only did I learn a great deal about POV, the heart of a story, and methods of characterization, but the collection also inspired me with the great possibilities a short story has to offer.

I've been indoctrinated into the classic New Yorker short story to such a degree that it was unsettling (in a good way) to read new ways of conceiving the form. Those formal potentialities coupled with the depth of emotion Hemingway brought to the page (sadly not featured by the many broadly drawn characterizations of the man we have today) comprised a masterclass in prose writing and language artistry. I hope some of what I learned sticks. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
I took a long time reading through this one, studying Hemingway's style. Not only did I learn a great deal about POV, the heart of a story, and methods of characterization, but the collection also inspired me with the great possibilities a short story has to offer.

I've been indoctrinated into the classic New Yorker short story to such a degree that it was unsettling (in a good way) to read new ways of conceiving the form. Those formal potentialities coupled with the depth of emotion Hemingway brought to the page (sadly not featured by the many broadly drawn characterizations of the man we have today) comprised a masterclass in prose writing and language artistry. I hope some of what I learned sticks. ( )
  Adrian_Astur_Alvarez | Dec 3, 2019 |
I had forgotten how good a writer the younger Hemingway was. He may have been a better short story writer than a novelist. ( )
  dasam | Jun 20, 2018 |
I have been reading Hemingway for about six years now and it has taken me a long time to accept that short stories have to be read differently than novels. They require more careful attention at a slower pace, whereas even the hardest novels, if you stick with them, can eventually break the dam of your ignorance with their sheer weight and then you understand them. Short stories are a different form of exercise but, when you accept this, they are entertaining on their own terms.

There can be no better writer than Hemingway to educate you about this, for he was a master of the craft. The First Forty-Nine Stories contains all the short writings from 1923-36, when he was at the peak of writing in this form, including everything from the collections In Our Time, Men Without Women and Winner Take Nothing, along with some others.

The first story (which is the last chronologically) is 'The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber' and is perhaps the perfect short story. It is quick and readable with good characters and a gripping event, while also delving into deep themes, not least the different destructive capacities of men and women. The worst thing you can do to a lion is kill them. You cannot dominate them.

There are a half-dozen other stories which are not far behind 'Macomber' in terms of quality. 'The Snows of Kilimanjaro' has the most beautiful ending and 'Hills Like White Elephants' is a masterpiece of brevity. 'In Another Country' makes a heart-breaking observation about what is really painful to lose in a life of suffering, and 'Indian Camp' makes stellar observations about the weight of parenthood. 'A Clean, Well-Lighted Place' is writing as architecture, about the importance of solace and having a consistent place to find it. It was perhaps with this sentiment in mind that Hemingway wrote 'Big Two-Hearted River', which is like a painting with words – it is influenced by Cézanne – and reading it brings all the peace of mind that looking at a great painting brings. It is a more impressive achievement the more you think about it.

These seven stories are the absolute best of Hemingway's short stories, and perhaps of all short stories, but the rest of the collection is not bad either. 'The Killers' and 'Fifty Grand' are both great storytelling, while 'Soldier's Home' and 'A Day's Wait' are affecting tales. 'Che Ti Dice La Patria?' is acerbic travel writing, while two bullfighting stories, 'The Undefeated' and 'The Capital of the World', force you to begrudgingly admit that the bull ring was a bounteous well for Hemingway's art.

There is plenty more besides, and though there are a few clunkers and the vignettes from In Our Time are mostly unnecessary, most of the lesser stories have something to recommend them. But the best of Hemingway's short stories reproduced here are essential for anyone who is serious about writing and literature. Reading Hemingway encourages you to write and to think about writing; not explicitly, but in the way that looking over a finely-crafted piece of woodworking and noticing how neat the seams are makes you wish you could carve. You can run your hands over his words like searching for grooves in the wood. ( )
  MikeFutcher | Jun 17, 2018 |
Certo interessante, come dire? Bisogna leggerlo! Ma non mi ha particolarmente impressionato ( )
  Edoxide | Apr 6, 2016 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (75 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Hemingway, Ernestautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Ferrata, GiansiroContribuidorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Nyytäjä, KaleviTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Trevisani, GiuseppeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

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Forty-nine stories reflect much of the intensity of Hemingway's own life and environment.

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