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Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom,…
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Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the… (original 2013; edição 2015)

por Robin Wall Kimmerer (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,1824112,219 (4.53)54
"An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--"As a leading researcher in the field of biology, Robin Wall Kimmerer understands the delicate state of our world. But as an active member of the Potawatomi nation, she senses and relates to the world through a way of knowing far older than any science. In Braiding Sweetgrass, she intertwines these two modes of awareness--the analytic and the emotional, the scientific and the cultural--to ultimately reveal a path toward healing the rift that grows between people and nature. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen"--… (mais)
Membro:crookedpath
Título:Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants
Autores:Robin Wall Kimmerer (Autor)
Informação:Milkweed Editions (2015), Edition: First Paperback, 408 pages
Colecções:Read with notes, A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:environmentalism, science

Pormenores da obra

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants por Robin Wall Kimmerer (2013)

Adicionado recentemente porbiblioteca privada, RobHoberman, GinaM19, Faintdreams, clue, andrisll, SharonGoforth
  1. 10
    The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World por David Abram (SonoranDreamer)
    SonoranDreamer: Both books are about seeing the world in ways we don't usually pay attention to.
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3.25 stars

The author is an Indigenous woman who studied botany, so she learned our white scientific ways to study and research. But she combines that with everything she learned while growing up Indigenous – the traditional “ways of knowing”, specifically with regards to trees, plants, nature.

I love the philosophy that nature is so much more than white people (and scientists) give it credit for. I can’t even explain, but I really did agree with most of what she described. I listened to the audio (read by the author) and I did lose focus at various parts, so I did miss some of it. But there were plenty of other interesting things mentioned/explained that I enjoyed listening to. ( )
  LibraryCin | May 3, 2021 |
Kimmerer is a Native American botanist, and in this book she reconciles her training in European science and botany with her Native American heritage to provide a scientific and spiritual appreciation of nature. She describes the Native American understanding of the relationship between humans and plants.

This is a beautiful book. It combines memoir, history, botany, ethnography, and spirituality to describe a very different way of thinking about the world. The Native American relationship to nature is one of reciprocity, not dominance, of working with nature to achieve common goals instead of subverting it to our needs. Kimmerer celebrates the beauty and utility of nature, and sees plants as teachers and guardians. If we all thought about nature this way, the world would be a very different place.

It's worth reading this book slowly, and taking time to think about what she has to say. Now that I have read it once, I would like to re-read individual essays on a regular basis because there is so much to think about and absorb. ( )
  Gwendydd | May 1, 2021 |
I'll listen to this again. ( )
  KittyCunningham | Apr 26, 2021 |
This was beautiful and moving and fascinating and sad, and I cried listening to many parts of it. The loss of land and place and language is incomprehensible, yet the Indigenous people who have had so much taken from them are still taking care of the earth/Earth. ( )
  spinsterrevival | Apr 15, 2021 |
Kimmerer's ethnobotanical work provides an intriguing insight into Anishinaabe science and botany. This work is filled with stories, philosophy and spirituality, intermixed with botany to give the reader an accessible book to leave them thinking.

There are many strengths in this volume. Notably, Kimmerer weaves together stories of her own life and experiences, allowing the reader insight into who she is - rather than merely narrating information to us. Furthermore, Kimmerer draws on a multitude of Indigenous perspectives, not only the Anishinaabeg, but also the Haudenosaunee and Maya. Using story, she critiques the capitalist mode of production and resource extraction - Windigo thinking, which extends this work to eco socialist, indigenous socialist / postcolonial socialist and eco postcolonial philosophies, though she does not use those terms in her own volume.

There are a frw weaknesses however. Throughout, Kimmerer refers to Indigrnous science, Indigenous knowledge, etc. And in some places it would be beneficial to be more specific, such as "Indigenous peoples of the Northeast Woodlands", or "Algonquian language groups", as there a few areas where a generality cannot be said to be true for all Indigenous peoples acrodd the Americas, and beyond. Another weakness is that Kimmerer mentions the "Zaaganaash" as the overseas people, when referring to the 7 fires prophecy - but does not mention the Wemitigozhi. This unfortunately is a common tendency of writers on the American side of the border.

Overlooking the few weaknesses present in the text, this work is overall a great read for those who are ecologically inclined, including eco socialists, ecofeminists, eco postcolonialists, animists, and those interested in an Anishinaabe ethnobotanical book. ( )
  WaldensLibrary | Apr 6, 2021 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (1 possível)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Kimmerer, Robin Wallautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Hughes, CindyArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kuhnz, ConnieDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Speaker, Mary AustinDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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For all the Keepers of the Fire
my parents
my daughters
and my grandchildren
yet to join us in this beautiful place
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Hold out your hands and let me lay upon them a sheaf of freshly picked sweetgrass, loose and flowing, like newly washed hair.
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[Preface] Hold out your hands and let me lay upon them a sheaf of freshly picked sweetgrass, loose and flowing, like newly washed hair.
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Wikipédia em inglês (1)

"An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--"As a leading researcher in the field of biology, Robin Wall Kimmerer understands the delicate state of our world. But as an active member of the Potawatomi nation, she senses and relates to the world through a way of knowing far older than any science. In Braiding Sweetgrass, she intertwines these two modes of awareness--the analytic and the emotional, the scientific and the cultural--to ultimately reveal a path toward healing the rift that grows between people and nature. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen"--

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