Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of…
A carregar...

The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance (original 2013; edição 2013)

por David Epstein

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3711452,807 (4.07)11
Explores the roles of both genetics and training in athletic success, arguing that both are equally necessary components of athletic achievement while considering such topics as race, gender, and genetic testing. We all knew a star athlete in high school. The one who made it look so easy. He was the starting quarterback and shortstop; she was the all-state point guard and high-jumper. Naturals. Or were they? The debate is as old as physical competition. Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports? Or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training? The truth is far messier than a simple dichotomy between nature and nurture. In the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, researchers have slowly begun to uncover how the relationship between biological endowments and a competitor's training environment affects athleticism. Sports scientists have gradually entered the era of modern genetic research. In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success, Sports Illustrated senior writer David Epstein tackles the great nature vs. nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving this great riddle. He investigates the so-called 10,000-hour rule to uncover whether rigorous and consistent practice from a young age is the only route to athletic excellence. Along the way, Epstein dispels many of our perceptions about why top athletes excel. He shows why some skills that we assume are innate, like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball or cricket batter, are not, and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like an athlete's will to train, might in fact have important genetic components. Through on-the-ground reporting from below the equator and above the Arctic Circle, revealing conversations with leading scientists and Olympic champions, and interviews with athletes who have rare genetic mutations or physical traits, Epstein forces us to rethink the very nature of athleticism.… (mais)
Membro:casanders2015
Título:The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance
Autores:David Epstein
Informação:Current Hardcover (2013), Hardcover, 352 pages
Colecções:E Book
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

The Sports Gene: Inside the Science of Extraordinary Athletic Performance por David Epstein (2013)

  1. 01
    Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise por Anders Ericsson (caimanjosh)
    caimanjosh: Both deal with the science behind expert performance...Sports Gene is more focused on athletic performance, but Peak provides more detail on just what "deliberate practice" actually entails. Both are worth a read.
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 11 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
An awesome genetics and sports read. Epstein highlights improbable and amazing sports stories, about 50% you'd know, and the rest just simply incredible. He gives the current knowledge of genetics related to all realms of athletics and pushes us to not be so PC and recognize and further utilize our genetic predispositions and not be mired in the " 10,000 hrs" rule in the nature vs nurture battle. ( )
  bsmashers | Aug 1, 2020 |
Not sure why I didnt like this more. Seems right up my alley. Sports. Science. Genes. But just could never get into it. Liked the reads about how the genes really control everything, and you either have the good ones or you dont. You can practice - but that only takes you so far. Got about half way through and had enough ( )
  bermandog | Dec 30, 2016 |
What makes a professional athlete? Does practice really make perfect -- can anyone do it? David Epstein sets out to answer this question, and the result is, well, maybe.

Epstein looks at a variety of sports and what traits are exhibited by the pros. Baseball, as it turns out, is a visual game -- while strength and reflex is important, it is exceptional visual acuity that separates the pros from the rest. Exceptional vision is a genetic trait, and those with genetically poor eyesight should probably seek a different profession. Genetics can't tell with certainty what combination of genes will make a pro athlete, however, it can spot poor genes that could stomp out a dream at a very early age.

Some sports, like golf, is more of an acquired skill. He follows the still-on going efforts of a man who decided one day to be a pro golfer and thought to test the 10,000 hour theory, which posits that if you spend 10,000 hours doing any given thing, you will become adept at it. While progress is encouraging, the bell curve would indicate rapid progress early in the program, with gains becoming more incremental and difficult to come by as the player reaches a certain point (and it's beyond that point where the masters dwell).

Epstein covers a variety of sports, not all of them big time, big money concerns. He tells us why Michael Jordan was destined to fail at baseball, and why Usain Bolt is the phenom he is. Some day we might be able to order certain genetic profiles that at least block the "you'll never make it" traits, but the road to perfection is complex, and there is likely to never be any guarantees. ( )
  JeffV | Sep 19, 2015 |
The Nature vs. Nurture controversy applied to sports. Pretty technical evaluation, best suited for those with strong background in genetics. ( )
  VGAHarris | Jan 19, 2015 |
I found Epstein's book to be a revelation. It contains a strongly reasoned argument about the impact of genetics on sport that does not pander to tired biases. Because there is a long history of horrid biases and some of humanities greatest crimes have been justified based on the alleged genetic superiority or inferiority of certain groups, many scientists have been justifiably leary of writing about the impact of genetics on athletic achievement.

Epstein does so very well. He write from data and he avoids making generalized judgements. I'd like to use his writing style as a primer for undergrads. This is how you write from evidence and avoid writing from conclusions based on that evidence.

It is not a perfect book, but it does so many things so well that it is difficult to fault him for neglecting the impact of performance enhancing drugs on athletic results.

Overall, this is destined to be a classic popular work in sports-science. It could also be sub-titled: how Malcolm Gladwell is wrong and misleading, but Epstein even has the grace to completely show-up Gladwell's arguments without turning this into a personal fight. (Gladwell has made a lot of money off of "10000 hours of practice is all that is needed for success" arguments. Epstein shows what the study this gloss is based on really showed and pointed out its shortcomings. 10000 hours will make anyone better, but it is incontrovertible that some people can benefit more from practice than others.

In any case, if you are at all interested in sport, genetics, or popular writing from research that is done very well, Epstein's book is for you. ( )
  nnschiller | Sep 18, 2014 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 14 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

Explores the roles of both genetics and training in athletic success, arguing that both are equally necessary components of athletic achievement while considering such topics as race, gender, and genetic testing. We all knew a star athlete in high school. The one who made it look so easy. He was the starting quarterback and shortstop; she was the all-state point guard and high-jumper. Naturals. Or were they? The debate is as old as physical competition. Are stars like Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps, and Serena Williams genetic freaks put on Earth to dominate their respective sports? Or are they simply normal people who overcame their biological limits through sheer force of will and obsessive training? The truth is far messier than a simple dichotomy between nature and nurture. In the decade since the sequencing of the human genome, researchers have slowly begun to uncover how the relationship between biological endowments and a competitor's training environment affects athleticism. Sports scientists have gradually entered the era of modern genetic research. In this controversial and engaging exploration of athletic success, Sports Illustrated senior writer David Epstein tackles the great nature vs. nurture debate and traces how far science has come in solving this great riddle. He investigates the so-called 10,000-hour rule to uncover whether rigorous and consistent practice from a young age is the only route to athletic excellence. Along the way, Epstein dispels many of our perceptions about why top athletes excel. He shows why some skills that we assume are innate, like the bullet-fast reactions of a baseball or cricket batter, are not, and why other characteristics that we assume are entirely voluntary, like an athlete's will to train, might in fact have important genetic components. Through on-the-ground reporting from below the equator and above the Arctic Circle, revealing conversations with leading scientists and Olympic champions, and interviews with athletes who have rare genetic mutations or physical traits, Epstein forces us to rethink the very nature of athleticism.

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Ligações Rápidas

Capas populares

Avaliação

Média: (4.07)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 14
3.5 3
4 24
4.5 3
5 22

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 160,274,146 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível