Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

A carregar...

An Unnecessary Woman (2012)

por Rabih Alameddine

Outros autores: Ver a secção outros autores.

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaDiscussões / Menções
1,2518515,459 (4.02)1 / 292
"Aaliya Sohbi lives alone in her Beirut apartment, surrounded by stockpiles of books. Godless, fatherless, childless, and divorced, Aaliya is her family's 'unnecessary appendage.' Every year, she translates a new favorite book into Arabic, then stows it away. The thirty-seven books that Aaliya has translated over her lifetime have never been read-- by anyone. After overhearing her neighbors, 'the three witches,' discussing her too-white hair, Aaliya accidentally dyes her hair too blue. In this breathtaking portrait of a reclusive woman's late-life crisis, readers follow Aaliya's digressive mind as it ricochets across visions of past and present Beirut. Colorful musings on literature, philosophy, and art are invaded by memories of the Lebanese Civil War and Aaliya's own volatile past. As she tries to overcome her aging body and spontaneous emotional upwellings, Aaliya is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left" --… (mais)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Grupo TópicoMessagensÚltima Mensagem 

» Ver também 292 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 85 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Read Around the World Challenge: Lebanon

“We, like most humans, consider history a lesson on a blackboard that can be sponged off.”

The author, Rabih Alameddine was born in Jordan to Lebanese parents, and grew up in Kuwait and Lebanon. An Unnecessary Woman is a beautifully-written, award-winning literary fiction about Aaliya, an elderly woman, a book-loving recluse, living in Beirut. Through her somewhat irreverent and cynical eyes we see Beirut from the 1950s to the 2000s.

For the first half of the book I was enthralled by the glorious writing. The second half of the book lost my attention as there is very little plot, and the constant references to different works of literature became irksome.

This was a stunning book with lots of beautiful lines, but could have been at least one hundred pages shorter. Some of my favourite quotes are:

“No loss is felt more keenly than the loss of what might have been. No nostalgia hurts as much as nostalgia for things that never existed.”

“I long ago abandoned myself to a blind lust for the written word. Literature is my sandbox. In it I play, build my forts and castles, spend glorious time.”

“Memory chooses to preserve what desire cannot hope to sustain.”

“We rarely consider that we're also formed by the decisions we didn't make, by events that could have happened but didn't, or by our lack of choices, for that matter.”

“There is none more conformist than one who flaunts his individuality.”

“you can tell how well a marriage is working by counting the bite marks on each partner’s tongue.”

“Mine is a face that would have trouble launching a canoe.”

“Forced learning and magic are congenital adversaries”

“The receding perspective of my past smothers my present. Remembering is the malignancy that feeds on my now.” ( )
1 vote mimbza | Apr 24, 2024 |
This is one of those delightful books that makes you stop and want to write down bits of it in order to remember the words forever. The cover reviewer is correct - this book does break your heart - so beware.
The main character is a so-called "unnecessary woman", living in Lebanon during the civil war. No one seems to want or need her, even her husband. She spends her life translating writers, storing up boxes of gradually bettering translations of the classics and new writers into Arabic.
I loved this complaining, grumbly women. She's 72, but I can identify with her feelings of invisibility and her need for something significant to hang onto. I traveled through this book, gradually coming to dread the end - both because I thought it would end one way (it doesn't) and because I feel I've lost the kind of person I would have loved to have spent afternoons with, discussing literature.
The true pleasure in this book are the selected words of other writers and her wise, cheeky, worldly interpretation of them.
Highly highly recommended. I found myself smiling throughout and weeping near the end. Truly a read to wallow in.
( )
1 vote Dabble58 | Nov 11, 2023 |
Interesting, SO many books to read! ( )
  maryzee | Nov 1, 2023 |
Aaliah Saleh resides in her old apartment in Beirut. She has translated 37 books into Arabic via a convoluted system, making 1 translation a year, but never submitted them for publication. She is in love with certain books and certain writers, Pessoa and his other identities especially.

In her 60s now, and having spent much of her life in solitude she reflects on her family with whom she has little to do, and the overheard title-tattle of three other women who live in her block.

While I liked this book, and some elements are likely to stay with me, I think other LTers enjoyed it more. ( )
  Caroline_McElwee | Aug 2, 2023 |
Set in Beirut, the narrator is a reclusive 72 year old woman, Aaliya Saleh, struggling to maintain dignity, while coming to terms with aging and she reflects on the past and her life, through the books she’s read.

I enjoyed the ramblings of this beautiful soul. I loved how each of her thoughts led to other thoughts as she repeatedly digressed and interrupted herself and it didn’t matter as everything flowed so well. And the books she mentions …. there are sooooo many books! There is heaps of information packed into such a short book and all so interesting. I laughed, I watched and waited with trepidation, I cringed, I was overwhelmed with sadness and was left with much to think about as I began to care so much about Aaliya, as time progressed. This is my first time reading a book by Rabih Alameddine. It is a Bookclub read and am looking forward to the discussion in a few weeks time. ( )
1 vote Carole888 | Feb 18, 2023 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 85 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores (8 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Rabih Alameddineautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculado
Lindgren, John Erik BøeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Toren, SuzanneNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Filmes relacionados
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
From my village I see as much of the universe as you can see from earth. So my village is as big as any other land For I am the size of what I see. Not the size of my height. -- Fernando Pessoa as Alberto Caeiro, The Keeper of Sheep
Perhaps reading and writing books is one of the last defenses human dignity has left, because in the end they remind us of whawt God once reminded us before He too evaporated in this age of relentless humiliations - that we are more than ourselves; that we have souls. And more, moreover. Or perhaps not. -- Richard Flanagan, Gould's Book of Fish
The cure for loneliness is solitude. -- Marianne Moore, from the essay "If I Were Sixteen Today"
Don Quixote's misfortune is not his imagination, but Sancho Panza. -- Franz Kafka, Dearest Father: Stories and Other Writings
Dedicatória
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
To Eric, with gratitude
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Podríamos decir que cuando me teñí el pelo de azul estaba pensando en otras cosas, y dos copas de vino tinto no mejoraban mi concentración.
You could say I was thinking of other things when I shampooed my hair blue, and two glasses of red wine didn't help my concentration.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
LCC Canónico

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês

Nenhum(a)

"Aaliya Sohbi lives alone in her Beirut apartment, surrounded by stockpiles of books. Godless, fatherless, childless, and divorced, Aaliya is her family's 'unnecessary appendage.' Every year, she translates a new favorite book into Arabic, then stows it away. The thirty-seven books that Aaliya has translated over her lifetime have never been read-- by anyone. After overhearing her neighbors, 'the three witches,' discussing her too-white hair, Aaliya accidentally dyes her hair too blue. In this breathtaking portrait of a reclusive woman's late-life crisis, readers follow Aaliya's digressive mind as it ricochets across visions of past and present Beirut. Colorful musings on literature, philosophy, and art are invaded by memories of the Lebanese Civil War and Aaliya's own volatile past. As she tries to overcome her aging body and spontaneous emotional upwellings, Aaliya is faced with an unthinkable disaster that threatens to shatter the little life she has left" --

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Current Discussions

Nenhum(a)

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.02)
0.5
1
1.5
2 11
2.5 6
3 54
3.5 25
4 104
4.5 18
5 96

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 204,815,556 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível