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All the Light We Cannot See por Anthony…
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All the Light We Cannot See (edição 2014)

por Anthony Doerr (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
13,547745332 (4.29)712
Marie-Laure has been blind since the age of six. Her father builds a perfect miniature of their Paris neighbourhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. But when the Nazis invade, father and daughter flee with a dangerous secret. Werner is a German orphan, destined to labour in the same mine that claimed his father's life, until he discovers a knack for engineering. His talent wins him a place at a brutal military academy, but his way out of obscurity is built on suffering. At the same time, far away in a walled city by the sea, an old man discovers new worlds without ever setting foot outside his home. But all around him, impending danger closes in.… (mais)
Membro:MrWetsnow
Título:All the Light We Cannot See
Autores:Anthony Doerr (Autor)
Informação:Scribner (2014), 531 pages
Colecções:Shishi's Books
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Informação Sobre a Obra

All the Light We Cannot See por Anthony Doerr

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    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society por Mary Ann Shaffer (gypsysmom)
    gypsysmom: Similar locale in that Guernsey and St. Malo were occupied by the German army during World War II. Resistance is also a main theme in both of them.
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    The Nightingale por Kristin Hannah (LISandKL)
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    Stones From The River por Ursula Hegi (cataylor, BookshelfMonstrosity)
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    The English Patient por Michael Ondaatje (BookshelfMonstrosity)
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    Station Eleven por Emily St. John Mandel (sturlington)
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    April in Paris por Michael Wallner (GoST)
    GoST: Another novel set in occupied France with a relationship between a German soldier and a French girl.
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    A Train in Winter: An Extraordinary Story of Women, Friendship, and Resistance in Occupied France por Caroline Moorehead (srdr)
  11. 00
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    WSB7: Similar overarching theme.
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    The Book of Everything por Guus Kuijer (Othemts)
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    Atonement [York Notes Advanced] por Ian McEwan (Steve.Gourley)
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» Ver também 712 menções

Inglês (720)  Espanhol (6)  Holandês (3)  Francês (3)  Alemão (3)  Dinamarquês (2)  Sueco (2)  Catalão (2)  Piratês (1)  Italiano (1)  Todas as línguas (743)
Mostrando 1-5 de 743 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
“wet, unwrinkled sand…It’s like cold silk. Cold, sumptuous silk onto which the sea has laid offerings…” such offerings as Doerr has laid before us with his descriptive prose. This is a beautifully written book. (Though some think it’s overly descriptive, but I like the attention to color and to scents; “adjectives are far too often of the glimmering, glowing,” and gasp!, “pellucid variety.”)

My favorite description in the book:

“And yet she can tell he is visited by fears so immense, so multiple, that she can almost feel the terror pulsing inside him. As though some beast breathes all the time at the windowpanes of his mind.”

But then I was wowed by his use of synesthesia* (and wish more had been done with this):

“Colors - that’s another thing people don’t expect. In her imagination, in her dreams, everything has color. The museum buildings are beige, chestnut, hazel. Its scientists are lilac and lemon yellow and Fox brown. Piano chords loll in the speaker of the wireless in the guard station, projecting rich blacks and complicated blues down the hall toward the key pound. Church bells send arcs of bronze careening off the windows. Bees are silver; pigeons are ginger and auburn and occasionally golden. The huge cypress trees she and her father pass on their morning walk are shimmering kaleidoscopes, each needle a polygon of light.
She has no memories of her mother but imagines her as white, a soundless brilliance. Her father radiates a thousand colors, opal, strawberry red, deep russet, wild greens; a smell like oil and metal, the feel of a lock tumbler sliding home, the sound of his key rings chiming as he walks. He is an olive green when he talks to a department head, an escalating series of oranges when he speaks with Mademoiselle Fluery from the greenhouse, a bright red when he tries to cook. He glows sapphire when he sits over his workbench in the evenings, humming almost inaudibly as he works, the tip of his cigarette gleaming a prismatic blue”

Such descriptions of color - and love the use of “loll” to describe the sound.

*Tangent: speaking of color, RadioLab did an excellent podcast on Colors (broken in three parts) that examined Newton’s exploration of colors (is it inherently within or without?) using prisms; in “Why isn’t the Sky Blue?” discussed how in older texts (using the Odyssey as an example) there is no mention of the color “blue” and modern scientists found an isolated clan who could not differentiate blue from green; and in “The Perfect Yellow” discussed finding tetra-chromes who see hues of colors we tri-chromes cannot see (but…this may be a matter of learned perception- like seeing blue instead of green or white by finding a foil that tests this rule.).

I had no problem following the time shifts in this book; I always knew where I was.

I think I had hoped for Werner to express more - some? - remorse for what happened with Frederick; Werner certainly is troubled with what happens to the girl on the swing; he does make up for it (to some extent?) with aiding Marie-Laure. I wished Werner were as fully realized as Marie-Laure. And Frederick more developed rather than merely be a foil for Werner. And some more Jutta in between, rather than re-appearing near the end. And von Rumpel is something of a comic book villain. But having said this, I was turning the page to find out what happened next.

I like much of how the endings are resolved, but they feel rushed. And we know (or think we know) what has happened to a specific object, but the myth or fairy tale associated with this is not touched upon.

Ha! Read another review that complained about the Americanisms in the book, and noted some (“sure” instead of “yes”, etc). Don’t recall if it was this read or another recent read in which I scratched my head and thought, wouldn’t they, the European characters, describe distance as “meters” rather than “yards” ( )
  jimgosailing | Nov 18, 2021 |
"All the Light We Cannot See" is a carefully-constructed piece that plays out in measured numbers, written in considered prose meant to evoke maximum emotional response from small set pieces; this is like a Hallmark Holiday Special or a hit pop song in its manufactured pathos. Doerr gives us three main characters with their separate plot threads (destined to converge, of course) told alternately in the 'present' of 1944 Saint-Malo and in times before that, with codas in 1974 and 2014; despite that, it it hardly non-linear in its presentation. The chapters are rarely longer than 3 or 4 pages, so they work like bites of a meal rather than courses, for easy digestion. This is not a bad book, not at all, but this isn't the literary coup it is trumpeted as.

Problematic for me as a reader, however, are what seem to be Doerr trademarks. I recently read his "Cloud Cuckoo Land" and found these two things central to that book. First lies in the growth of his frequently adolescent characters: they don't. They age, experience joys and horrors, survive long enough to satisfy the plot, but they don't vary from their underlying Child, their Moral Theme. They don't really change. In ATLWCS, Marie-Laure remains in hiding throughout much of the book, and Werner is swept up into the youth indoctrination of Nazi Germany and then the Wehmacht itself: neither is really free to grow their moral compass beyond their basic programming so they don't. Keeps things simpler for the author that way, oui?

Worse though is Doerr's ruthless pen towards his literary children. As in CCL, he takes handicapped and/or disadvantaged children, emotionally and physically abuses the living sh*t out of them and calls it Drama. Yup, it's sure to draw tears that way.

Rather than wave readers away from this book, I'd simply give a caveat to any going into this book: don't expect what it ain't. This is a bittersweet confection engineered to hit you in the feels, NOT Steinbeck or Cather. ( )
1 vote MLShaw | Nov 10, 2021 |
A wonderful book. I read this book borrowed from my public library shortly after its release, receiving an impression that it could become one of the best examples of triumph over adversity. May not be an all-time classic but this certainly struck a chord with me. 5 stars. ( )
  Kintra | Oct 22, 2021 |
Super good.
  CMOBrien | Oct 18, 2021 |
interesting
readable
  zeeshan110 | Oct 12, 2021 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 743 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
What really makes a book of the summer is when we surprise ourselves. It’s not just about being fascinated by a book. It’s about being fascinated by the fact that we’re fascinated.

The odds: 2-1
All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
Pros: Blind daughter of a locksmith meets reluctant Nazi engineering whiz! What more do you want?
Cons: Complex, lyrical historical fiction may not have the necessary mass appeal.
adicionada por feeling.is.first | editarTime.com, Lev Grossman (Jun 25, 2014)
 
“All the Light We Cannot See” is more than a thriller and less than great literature. As such, it is what the English would call “a good read.” Maybe Doerr could write great literature if he really tried. I would be happy if he did.
adicionada por zhejw | editarNew York Times, William Vollman (May 8, 2014)
 
I’m not sure I will read a better novel this year than Anthony ­Doerr’s “All the Light We Cannot See.”
 
By the time the narrative finds Marie-Laure and Werner in the same German-occupied village in Brittany, a reader’s skepticism has been absolutely flattened by this novel’s ability to show that the improbable doesn’t just occur, it is the grace that allows us to survive the probable.
adicionada por mysterymax | editarThe Boston Globe, John Freeman (May 3, 2014)
 
Werner’s experience at the school is only one of the many trials through which Mr. Doerr puts his characters in this surprisingly fresh and enveloping book. What’s unexpected about its impact is that the novel does not regard Europeans’ wartime experience in a new way. Instead, Mr. Doerr’s nuanced approach concentrates on the choices his characters make and on the souls that have been lost, both living and dead.
adicionada por ozzer | editarNew York Times, Janet Maslin (Apr 28, 2014)
 

» Adicionar outros autores (4 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Doerr, Anthonyautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Appelman, ZachNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Barba, AndrésTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bosch, EefjeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Buckley, LynnDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Cáceres, Carmen M.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Clauzier, ManuelArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Gewurz, Daniele A.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Goretsky, TalDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Immink, WilDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Löcher-Lawrence, WernerTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Sasahara, Ellen R.Designerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Stokseth, LeneOvers.autor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tarkka, HannaKääNt.autor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Vieira, Manuel AlbertoTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Zani, IsabellaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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In August 1944 the historic walled city of Saint-Malo,
the brightest jewel of the Emerald Coast of Brittany,
France, was almost totally destroyed by fire. . . . Of the
865 buildings within the walls, only 182 remained
standing and all were damaged to some degree.
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If only life were like a Jules Verne novel, thinks Marie-Laure, and you could page ahead when you most needed to, and learn what would happen.
Nothing will be healed in this kitchen.  Some griefs can never be put right.
Music spirals out of the radios, and it is splendid to drowse on the davenport, to be warm and fed, to feel the sentences hoist her up and carry her somewhere else.
There is pride, too, though — pride that he has done it alone. That his daughter is so curious, so resilient. There is the humility of being a father to someone so powerful, as if he were only a narrow conduit for another, greater thing. That's how it feels right now, he thinks, kneeling beside her, rinsing her hair: as though his love for his daughter will outstrip the limits of his body. The walls could fall away, even the whole city, and the brightness of that feeling would not wane.
Werner tries to see what Frederick sees: a time before photography, before binoculars. And here was someone willing to tramp out into a wilderness brimming with the unknown and bring back paintings. A book not so much full of birds as full of evanescence, of blue-winged trumpeting mysteries.
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Marie-Laure has been blind since the age of six. Her father builds a perfect miniature of their Paris neighbourhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. But when the Nazis invade, father and daughter flee with a dangerous secret. Werner is a German orphan, destined to labour in the same mine that claimed his father's life, until he discovers a knack for engineering. His talent wins him a place at a brutal military academy, but his way out of obscurity is built on suffering. At the same time, far away in a walled city by the sea, an old man discovers new worlds without ever setting foot outside his home. But all around him, impending danger closes in.

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