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Cuckoo Song por Frances Hardinge
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Cuckoo Song (edição 2014)

por Frances Hardinge (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
5362934,824 (4.03)33
In post-World War I England, eleven-year-old Triss nearly drowns in a millpond known as "The Grimmer" and emerges with memory gaps, aware that something is terribly wrong, and to try to set things right, she must meet a twisted architect who has designs on her family.
Membro:LJMax
Título:Cuckoo Song
Autores:Frances Hardinge (Autor)
Informação:Macmillan Children's Books (2014), Edition: Main Market Ed., 416 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:**
Etiquetas:fiction, ya

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Cuckoo Song por Frances Hardinge

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» Ver também 33 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 29 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
It took me a while to get through- I'm not sure why, but the last quarter was a slog. ( )
  Elna_McIntosh | Sep 29, 2021 |
Series Info/Source: This is a stand alone book. I borrowed this as an audiobook through Audible Plus.

Audiobook Quality (4/5): The narration of this book was very well done and pleasant to listen to. The narrator did speak pretty slow for me, so I ended up listening to this at 1.2x. No complaints though, this was a great book to listen to on audiobook.

Story (4/5): This started out super slow but I ended up enjoying it once all the strange fae creatures started appearing. There are some interesting concepts behind how the fae survive and thrive. Also the idea of someone being replaced by something that’s not them but not realizing they’ve been replaced; it‘s super creepy. While this wasn’t as good as "A Face Like Glass" or "Deeplight" but still a well done story and beautifully written.

Characters (4/5): Triss was okay as a character but I never engaged with her all that well. She never really knows herself so it’s hard to really like her. She does grow and change as the book continues. I enjoyed some of the side characters more, especially some of the rather intriguing fae characters that flit in and out of the story.

Setting (4/5): This takes place in a suburb of London right after WWI. It’s an interesting setting and has widespread implications for how a lot of the adult characters act towards certain things. I enjoyed the discussions of how the fae are trying to survive in this new more technological world and enjoyed getting a glimpse into their small secret places.

Writing Style (4/5): This is writing beautifully with amazing description and great care and thoughtfulness. Unfortunately, that means this started out really really slow. The whole first part of the story where Triss is trying to figure out why she feels different was flat out boring at points. This is definitely a slow burn mystery for quite awhile. However, I ended up loving the second half of the book a ton. I still feel like Hardinge’s more recent books have been more creative and have more intriguing world-building and I have enjoyed those later books more.

My Summary (4/5): Overall I liked this and am glad I listened to it. This is the fourth Hardinge book I have read and I liked this a lot better than “A Skinful of Shadows” but not nearly as much as "A Face Like Glass" or "Deeplight”. Hardinge’s writing style is beautiful with amazing description and a lot of introspective thoughts. Unfortunately, this was just a bit slow to start for me. I plan on reading Hardinge’s “The Lie Tree” next on my quest to read all of Hardinge’s books. ( )
  krau0098 | Feb 19, 2021 |
completely gorgeous, highly original.

the final third loses some of the magic of the start of the book though. ( )
  mjhunt | Jan 22, 2021 |
I was rather impressed with how much I could feel and relate for our heroine, but then I wonder if this is more a feature of good YA or just a feature of excellent writing.

In the end, I am forced to admit that my peer-pressuring buddies who twisted mine arms to read another YA title outside of my so-called comfort zone were all very right in their decision to do so. I feel as if I learned something very important in this book, even if I didn't discover anything new about myself or through the messages within the text. I *did*, however, think this would be a great book to introduce to my daughter once she gets to a certain age. The dark fantasy should appeal to any kid of any age, and the serious under and over-tones of both emotions and the intensity of the choices being made should make for a great tale to reread many times over, as children are wont to do.

And for those fans of Neil Gaiman, for either [b:The Graveyard Book|2213661|The Graveyard Book|Neil Gaiman|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1303859949s/2213661.jpg|2219449] or [b:Coraline|17061|Coraline|Neil Gaiman|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1443798739s/17061.jpg|2834844], I think this one is a bit more accessible and readable. Yeah, I'm saying that, even though I'm a huge fan. I actually got into all of the characters in a way that's fairly uncommon for me. I usually fall back on plot or ideas or themes to carry the crest of the novels I read, and think it's a real lark and a surprise when a character is able to get under my skin and tear my stuffing out. (Not that I would go this far for this book, but the characterization was way above average.)

If I were a new reader, questioning or still questioning my identity, I might think this novel might rank as one of my absolute favourites of all time.

But since I feel like I can identify fine with all the bits and scraps that make up this poor girl's troubles, and since I saw through them and guessed at the end solution, sans "time", and because it harkened to all the old myths, it came across as truly beautiful example of wonderful writing, reintroducing a sense of wonder and fae in our world, I was more than merely pleased by the technique. I truly enjoyed it.

Plus, it was a delightful setup to be placed in 1920's England. I felt like I was living in a Twilight Zone episode of Downton Abbey with the idea-fantastic grace of [b:The Anubis Gates|142296|The Anubis Gates|Tim Powers|https://d.gr-assets.com/books/1344409006s/142296.jpg|2193115], and the creepy ambiance of all the classic Stephen King horror, keeping us in the horrible now as dolls chitter at us.

Beyond all that, and beyond seeing what the character needed to become, I was quite surprised with a number of the magical scenes, so don't start assuming you'll guess everything in this novel, you horror fans. I'll definitely be reading more of Frances Hardinge.

(On a side note, I was absolutely convinced that the author was obese. All that HEAVY insistence on being HUNGRY all the time made me think of either an eating disorder or Audrey Two. So of course I checked out the GR page, and no, she isn't. She looks positively skinny. I scratched my head and wondered at the power of human imagination. The author is either POWERFULLY empathetic, or I'm a complete moron. Have fun with that, peeps. :) ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
It's totally on me that I judged this book by its cover, expecting a gothic story about creepy dolls, which, I guess in a way, it kinda is. Just not in the way I expected and this caused me to never really connect with the story or Triss or Pen or anyone really. But for people who actually read the jacket blurb, I'm sure you'll find the story delivers a slow-paced historical fantasy with quiet horror.

Note to self for memory's sake (major spoilers below):

Triss wakes up, not immediately knowing herself, and finds out she was pushed in the Grimmer. It's revealed Pen hired The Architect to take her sister Triss away forever because Pen hated her. But instead of only making Triss disappear The Architect replaces Triss with a changeling created by The Shrike, one made of leaves and sticks and Triss' diary pages and other personal objects, later named Trista by Pen. He did this bit of trickery in order to get revenge on Triss and Pen's father who broke his bargain with The Architect. He planned to entomb the real Triss in one of the father's buildings but Trista saves her. She extends the only 7 days she was meant to "live" by sticking a piece of herself (a necklace with her name on it that Pen gave her) thereby stopping the watch and the countdown on her life.
  flying_monkeys | Oct 19, 2019 |
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Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Frances Hardingeautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Iacobaci GiuseppeTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kempe, YlvaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Lionetti, ClaudiaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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To Dylan, my nephew and godson. May you always regard the world's follies with the same mellow calm
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Her head hurt. There was a sound grating against her mind, a music-less rasp like the rustling of paper. Somebody had taking a laugh, crumples it into a great, crackly ball, and stuffed her skull with it.
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Occasionally Triss had been brought in to see this room, as if it was a sick relative. (p. 30)
Neglect had given the Old Docks a dangerous air, like a half-starved dog. (p. 335)
She could feel the scrape of their fingernails like glass shards in her stomach. (p. 213) 
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In post-World War I England, eleven-year-old Triss nearly drowns in a millpond known as "The Grimmer" and emerges with memory gaps, aware that something is terribly wrong, and to try to set things right, she must meet a twisted architect who has designs on her family.

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