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So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to…
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So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures (edição 2014)

por Maureen Corrigan (Autor)

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251880,761 (3.96)21
"The "Fresh Air" book critic investigates the enduring power of The Great Gatsby -- "The Great American Novel we all think we've read, but really haven't." Conceived nearly a century ago by a man who died believing himself a failure, it's now a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. But how well do we really know The Great Gatsby? As Maureen Corrigan, Gatsby lover extraordinaire, points out, while Fitzgerald's masterpiece may be one of the most popular novels in America, many of us first read it when we were too young to fully comprehend its power. Offering a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great-and utterly unusual-So We Read On takes us into archives, high school classrooms, and even out onto the Long Island Sound to explore the novel's hidden depths, a journey whose revelations include Gatsby's surprising debt to hard-boiled crime fiction, its rocky path to recognition as a "classic," and its profound commentaries on the national themes of race, class, and gender. With rigor, wit, and infectious enthusiasm, Corrigan inspires us to re-experience the greatness of Gatsby and cuts to the heart of why we are, as a culture, "borne back ceaselessly" into its thrall. Along the way, she spins a new and fascinating story of her own"--… (mais)
Membro:LindsTee
Título:So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures
Autores:Maureen Corrigan (Autor)
Informação:Little, Brown and Company (2014), Edition: 1, 352 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca, Em leitura
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So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures por Maureen Corrigan

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Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A delightful little book that compelled me to go out and buy a used copy of TGG and highlight and tab it extensively. Just as Corrigan said I would, I found marginalia such as "green light = $."

Her visit to Manhassett was a complete bummer. It confirmed my belief that America's or at least Long Island's green breast days are behind it now and apparently were in FSF's time too, e. g., the author revisits her old parochial high school near Manhassett and finds it surrounded by a razor wire-topped cyclone fence. And I see that the homes there listed on line, rather drab and functional for the most part, list for over $1,000,000. And if you go to gawk at the home that is most likely the model for Gatsby's, you will be chased off.

The insights of the actor who has read the book aloud hundreds of times on stage likely warrant a book of their own.

In my personal pantheon Hemingway held top spot until I read his most recent biography. Now I have a suitable replacement.
  JoeHamilton | Dec 25, 2020 |
So We Read On is not strictly a bio of Scott Fitzgerald and/or the time he spent writing The Great Gatsby. Author Corrigan (a big fan of The Great Gatsby) focuses on the history and meaning (also covering symbolism in this book) of this novel.

Also discussed is Fitzgerald's relationship with others, including Hemingway: "There are many reasons why Fitzgerald struggled for nine years to write a novel after Gatsby, but the seed of self-doubt that Hemingway watered certainly may have contributed to the blight."

In addition to Corrigan's thoughtful discussions on Gatsby and Fitzgerald, interesting tidbits are also included. For instance, until reading this book, I didn't know that there were naked ladies swimming the eyes on the iconic cover designed by Francis Cugat, older brother of band-leader Xavier. Not only that, Francis Cugat received a flat fee of $100, without any royalties, and never did a book cover again. Corrigan suspects it was because it was too much work for not enough money.

Next time I read The Great Gatsby, I will probably have this book by my side. ( )
  ValerieAndBooks | Jul 7, 2017 |
"The Great Gatsby" is regarded as one of the great fictional insights into American culture. This book may offer additional insight into "Gatsby's" creation and significance. ( )
  clifforddham | May 8, 2015 |
This book is about a love affair, but not one between two people. Rather, it's a love affair between a reader/book reviewer/English professor and one of the acknowledged classics of 20th Century American Literature.
Corrigan tells the story behind the book's composition, tracing its roots in Scott Fitzgerald's own troubled life and the period that he and Zelda (who, by that point, had been institutionalized) lived in and came to epitomize.
She also traces the novel's trajectory in the pantheon of America literature. Originally published in 1925 to little critical acclaim, it wasn't until a generation after Fitzgerald's death in 1940 that it became a mainstay of the literature of the first half of the 20th Century.. ( )
1 vote dickmanikowski | Jan 12, 2015 |
A special thank you to Little Brown & Company and NetGalley for a complimentary reading copy in exchange for an honest review.

So We Read On: How The Great Gatsby Came to Be and Why It Endures, by Maureen Corrigan offers extraordinary insights and commentary, into the real meaning behind this timeless classic; the characters, the time, viewpoints and perspectives, symbolisms, comparisons, and interesting tidbits of this talented author, Scott Fitzgerald; inspiring readers to re-read, to experience the life of the good and the bad of this exciting era and the “American Dream”.

As a huge fan of The Great Gatsby, having read it many times, during my younger years, and within the last few years, the movie, performances, reading the book again twice, and listened to the audiobook. Have also read Z, Zelda Fitzgerald and many other books surrounding this intriguing couple.

Wow, So We Read On was outstanding! A thought provoking and compelling view with a fresh look and perspective into the symbolism between the life of Scott Fitzgerald and Gatsby character. I listened to the audiobook, read by the author; so right on, as her vast knowledge is reflective throughout the pages.

I was so engrossed, as I am a big research nut and loved Corrigan's passion and extensive insights (what a super idea going back to the high school as everyone has a different take). The entire time I was listening to this captivating book, I was thinking “Wow, Corrigan could duplicate this book with all the classics out there!” It would be incredible, as I for one would buy anything she writes.

So We Read On is a book you will want to buy (as ideal for reference, gifts, and would make a great book club choice, or for lectures, groups, etc.), as I found myself trying to make notes, as there is so much to take in.

I cannot possibly hit on all my notes as you have to read the book; however, some of the main items I found fascinating. Please forgive any of my errors.

The Great Gatsby is similar to Scott’s end of relationship with Zelda. Symbolic of The Price of the American Dream. The Great Gatsby is not a character driven or plot driven novel; it is a voice driven novel. Gatsby is the ultimate enigma and center of the novel.

How a junior high or high school student views The Great Gatsby, versus a mature adult (totally different), as why you need to re-read many times as you age, as the meaning is profound.

Gatsby’s obsession with Daisy; the sensationalism, stalker like behavior, and his all or nothing demands. Future – The constant green light. Daisy is a green light and a voice full of money.

Have heard many discussions regarding the significance of the past to dreams of the future. The struggle of humans to achieve goals by both transcending and re-creating the past. Yet humans prove themselves unable to move beyond the past: in the metaphoric language--the current draws them backward as they row forward toward the green light.

The isolation of Gatsby’s life, as he is always alone, similar to Fitzgerald’s life (many similarities, depending on what was going on in his personal life with Zelda and timing). Burial, etc.

The meaning behind the rainbow of shirts, the cars, the parties, the glitz, glamour, money – Does Daisy think Gatsby is becoming like Tom? What happened to the poor humble boy – is he gone?

The Great Depression (lights out), parties and black Tues 1929; good times cannot roll on indefinitely. The Great Gatsby projects allusion. A funny novel, comedy like novel.

Scott asks Zelda to draw sketches of Gatsby in order to see him more clearly (would it not be great to find these drawings)?

J Gatsby a character a 17 yr. old boy would invent-young and reckless; Older readers gravitate for a more measured and mournful voice.

Her students do not like Nick, they think he is passive and do not like the scene at the end – acts not talks. Nick is wishy washy; and kids are unimpressed.

The Great Gatsby is really the only successful book Fitzgerald wrote, and unfortunately was not appreciated until after his death.

Represents rich careless people – detached poetic style. Page for page is elaborately patterned. The complexity of the novel so overlooked. Brilliantly written.

The American Dream is irresistible, heartbreaking and buoyant. Gatsby and Daisy’s reunion took place in the middle of the novel (which is important).

Billboard and green light (symbols); patterns and narrative structure; always reaching and striving and still unable to find happiness

A hard boiled story. The novel is wildly over designed.

Drawing on the author’s own experience as a reader, lecturer, and critic; a powerful read you will not want to miss. I was blown away! Corrigan is witty and brutally honest and yes, you definitely will want to re-experience Gatsby in new more favorable light. Read both - Highly recommend!

Judith D. Collins Must Read Books
( )
  JudithDCollins | Nov 27, 2014 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 8 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Taking what might be called a holistic approach, she examines “Gatsby” from every angle: from close readings of the novel’s language (its chief attraction), to biographical matters, textual history, media reincarnations (movies, plays, homages, even computer games), critical responses and its place in today’s culture. (In the final chapter, Corrigan returns to her high school and sits in on a few discussions of it.) She clearly knows the novel minutely, has read most of the criticism (a corpus as big as the Ritz), has visited the archives to report on its wonders, and is a fund of anecdotes about the Fitzgeralds and their world.
adicionada por rybie2 | editarWashington Post, Steven Moore (Sep 8, 2014)
 
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"The "Fresh Air" book critic investigates the enduring power of The Great Gatsby -- "The Great American Novel we all think we've read, but really haven't." Conceived nearly a century ago by a man who died believing himself a failure, it's now a revered classic and a rite of passage in the reading lives of millions. But how well do we really know The Great Gatsby? As Maureen Corrigan, Gatsby lover extraordinaire, points out, while Fitzgerald's masterpiece may be one of the most popular novels in America, many of us first read it when we were too young to fully comprehend its power. Offering a fresh perspective on what makes Gatsby great-and utterly unusual-So We Read On takes us into archives, high school classrooms, and even out onto the Long Island Sound to explore the novel's hidden depths, a journey whose revelations include Gatsby's surprising debt to hard-boiled crime fiction, its rocky path to recognition as a "classic," and its profound commentaries on the national themes of race, class, and gender. With rigor, wit, and infectious enthusiasm, Corrigan inspires us to re-experience the greatness of Gatsby and cuts to the heart of why we are, as a culture, "borne back ceaselessly" into its thrall. Along the way, she spins a new and fascinating story of her own"--

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