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The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty…
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The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books Saved My Life (original 2014; edição 2014)

por Andy Miller (Autor), Andy Miller (Narrador), Audible Studios (Publisher)

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5033536,084 (3.38)29
"An editor and writer's vivaciously entertaining, and often moving, chronicle of his year-long adventure with fifty great books (and two not-so-great ones)-- a true story about reading that reminds us why we should all make time in our lives for books. Nearing his fortieth birthday, author and critic Andy Miller realized he's not nearly as well read as he'd like to be. A devout book lover who somehow fell out of the habit of reading, he began to ponder the power of books to change an individual life-- including his own-- and to the define the sort of person he would like to be. Beginning with a copy of Bulgakov's Master and Margarita that he happens to find one day in a bookstore, he embarks on a literary odyssey of mindful reading and wry introspection. From Middlemarch to Anna Karenina to A Confederacy of Dunces, these are books Miller felt he should read; books he'd always wanted to read; books he'd previously started but hadn't finished; and books he'd lied about having read to impress people.Combining memoir and literary criticism, The Year of Reading Dangerously is Miller's heartfelt, humorous, and honest examination of what it means to be a reader. Passionately believing that books deserve to be read, enjoyed, and debated in the real world, Miller documents his reading experiences and how they resonated in his daily life and ultimately his very sense of self. The result is a witty and insightful journey of discovery and soul-searching that celebrates the abiding miracle of the book and the power of reading"-- "A vivaciously witty and entertaining chronicle of one man's quest to better himself by reading fifty great books (and two not-so-great ones), The Year of Reading Dangerously--the grown-up version of a grade-schooler's reading journal--reminds us why we should all make time in our lives for books"--… (mais)
Membro:cyscaine
Título:The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books Saved My Life
Autores:Andy Miller (Autor)
Outros autores:Andy Miller (Narrador), Audible Studios (Publisher)
Informação:Audible Studios (2014)
Colecções:Audible Books
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The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books (and Two Not-So-Great Ones) Saved My Life por Andy Miller (2014)

  1. 00
    The Polysyllabic Spree por Nick Hornby (nessreader)
    nessreader: Both reader's diaries of what and why they read over about a year. Both readers are middleclass english boys; both are engaging commentators even about the books you'll never want to read yourself. Both reject some Canonical Novels, then say why.
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Mostrando 1-5 de 35 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Not reading dangerously in any way, shape or form, and it's pretty much a glorified blog, but still an entertaining, easy read that's made me really want to knuckle down and get some Tolstoy down me. Your enjoyment of the book may be aided if you're a slightly self important, anxious white man in your late 30's living in the South of England. ( )
  arewenotben | Jul 31, 2020 |
As the inevitable slide towards forty begins, Andy Miller realises that he needs to be better read. He has been a book lover for years, but now doesn’t really read anything, anymore. One day when browsing through a charity shop for Mr men books for his son, he comes across The Master and Margarita by Bulgakov and decides that now is time to do something about his reading habits.

Compiling a list with his wife, his list of betterment as he describes it throughout the book, he sets about choosing fifty books that will expand his mind and his horizons. A lot of the books that he chooses are those that he had claimed to read in the past, but had never actually got round to. There are the literary classics, the door stoppers and the odd pulp fiction, that populate his reading landscape. So of these he loves, others he doesn’t…

A reminder of why we should make some time for reading and books, Miller’s book is a wry examination of what it means for him to be a reader, and the way that his book habits affect his daily life.

There seem to be more books about books these days, and this one was worth reading as it is an honest account of the re-discovery of books by a lapsed reader. He has a very different taste in the books that he chooses than I would, but there is a little common ground of one we have read. The writing is funny at times, and he can have a harsh tongue for the occasional author, but it is worth reading anyone who is a lapsed reader. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
4.5 stars. I really loved this until toward the end. ( )
  BeccaNaylor | Oct 23, 2019 |
I recently heard two New Yorker writers talk about their reading habits. We might expect these writers to be systematic in their reading, but that does not appear to be the case. Both read widely, and not necessarily with a plan. It's nice to think about setting aside a summer, say, to read a particular author, or subject. But for these writers, reading is more serendipitous, or used to "fill in" the gaps of missed literature.

This was very reassuring to me, as that's what my reading is, too, to which my list of read books attests. In addition, to fuel my serendipity, I like to read what others have read. I happened on Andy Miller's report about his reading habits in his year of reading dangerously. With breezy style and British wit, he reports on the 50 books on his "List of Betterment - books he could not only SAY he had read, but books he had ACTUALLY read, and in an appendix lists the next 50. (should someone tell him about Goodreads.com?) He relates his reading experiences and the intersections they made with his life in this highly readable book. There were some cult books and references to contemporary music I did not understand. But also some books I had already read along with some new ones to put on my own list.

Miller's quirky style and sense of humor make for very entertaining reading. For instance:

**Moby Dick (book 10) and the Da Vinci Code (book 0 - not on the List of Betterment) are grouped in a chapter. The "Love Match" between Herman Melville and Dan Brown - Ten Astounding Simularities" - is laugh-out-loud hilarious!

**On Middlemarsh - how will he get through all the pages and beyond his assumption of it as "chick lit?" His wife, who loves the book, suggests he read 50 pages a day. So he tackles it. Before he knew it he was engrossed, even while standing in line at the shops, and needed to keep reading. Avid readers will recognize this strategy!

**On not finishing books: Of Human Bondage and Pride and Prejudice are grouped together. The former was left unfinished until Mr. Darcy's example in Pride and Prejudice guilted him into going back to finish it. (I don't know if even Mr. Darcy can help me with Wolf Hall)

**Douglas Adams fans will enjoy the Epilogue in which he is featured.

Miller's aim is not to summarize the books he reads but to relate them in some way to his life, with the abiding belief that, when reading "you look up, the world has changed."



( )
  steller0707 | Aug 25, 2019 |
A failed and woefully misguided attempt at engaging with literature. I really don't understand why the author thought this book was a good idea. On the face of it, it seems accessible enough: a man realises he doesn't read enough as he feels he ought to and so creates a list of books to read, then writes about his journey through them. Worth a blog, maybe, but only a book if you're somebody important or you can write something special.

Andy Miller, unfortunately, is neither. None of his observations are particularly insightful or entertaining, and often disappointingly perfunctory. You get the feeling that he is only reading so that he can write about them. Nothing is spontaneous or natural, and there is the sort of laboured, self-referential quirkiness that characterises all books of this type. Perhaps that is the only sort of 'humour' that is safe enough to be greenlit by a publisher's marketing department nowadays – it seems to be everywhere and is uniformly ineffective. This is before you even get to the fact that Andy Miller is often writing about Andy Miller than about books; it is remarkable just how much of The Year of Reading Dangerously is about his personal likes and daily routine, his favourite music as a teenager, and his bland middle-class life. It's an inoffensive existence but there's no reason we should be interested in it. Miller is quite irritatingly entitled; he has a good job, an understanding wife and a young son, and yet complains throughout about the lack of fulfilment in his life. He has no idea what it is to really need a book in your life, something so right that it stops you from falling into a pit.

As for the books themselves, they are treated appallingly. "I had trained myself to be good at reading again," he writes on page 249, when in fact all he has done is complete a checklist. I certainly don't see how they 'saved his life', as the subtitle suggests. There is something unseemly about bragging about books, whether you've read them or not; reading should be a solitary activity, even private, and yet you cannot escape the feeling that whenever Miller reads a book on his list, it is not about looking for insight or even entertainment, but how he can trade his relationship with the book for social kudos. The books are digested as content, as consumables; as Sudokus to be tackled and then discarded so that he can hit a word count for his manuscript. It is perhaps fitting, then, that his own contribution to the world's library proves just as disposable to us as the vast majority of his booklist does to him. It is all terribly conceited and middle-class, not so much about 'saving his life' as about saving face. Far from reading dangerously, this is a disappointing account of a year of reading fearfully, haphazardly, superficially. ( )
  MikeFutcher | Jul 27, 2019 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 35 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Miller's year spent reading proved dangerous because it made him admit that he wanted and needed to write, so in the course of it he quit his job in publishing to work on this book. The books saved his life but put his livelihood at risk; nevertheless his gratuitous act turns out to be triumphantly justified. While extolling books written by others, he shows himself to be a valuably idiosyncratic writer, whose own book is like nothing else I have ever read – a combination of criticism and memoir that is astute, tender, funny and often wickedly ironic.
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"An editor and writer's vivaciously entertaining, and often moving, chronicle of his year-long adventure with fifty great books (and two not-so-great ones)-- a true story about reading that reminds us why we should all make time in our lives for books. Nearing his fortieth birthday, author and critic Andy Miller realized he's not nearly as well read as he'd like to be. A devout book lover who somehow fell out of the habit of reading, he began to ponder the power of books to change an individual life-- including his own-- and to the define the sort of person he would like to be. Beginning with a copy of Bulgakov's Master and Margarita that he happens to find one day in a bookstore, he embarks on a literary odyssey of mindful reading and wry introspection. From Middlemarch to Anna Karenina to A Confederacy of Dunces, these are books Miller felt he should read; books he'd always wanted to read; books he'd previously started but hadn't finished; and books he'd lied about having read to impress people.Combining memoir and literary criticism, The Year of Reading Dangerously is Miller's heartfelt, humorous, and honest examination of what it means to be a reader. Passionately believing that books deserve to be read, enjoyed, and debated in the real world, Miller documents his reading experiences and how they resonated in his daily life and ultimately his very sense of self. The result is a witty and insightful journey of discovery and soul-searching that celebrates the abiding miracle of the book and the power of reading"-- "A vivaciously witty and entertaining chronicle of one man's quest to better himself by reading fifty great books (and two not-so-great ones), The Year of Reading Dangerously--the grown-up version of a grade-schooler's reading journal--reminds us why we should all make time in our lives for books"--

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