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All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went…
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All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid (edição 2014)

por Matt Bai (Autor)

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1126194,637 (4.25)3
"The former chief political correspondent for The New York Times Magazine brilliantly revisits the Gary Hart affair and looks at how it changed forever the intersection of American media and politics. In 1987, Gary Hart--articulate, dashing, refreshingly progressive--seemed a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination for president and led George H.W. Bush comfortably in the polls. And then: rumors of marital infidelity, an indelible photo of Hart and a model snapped near a fatefully named yacht (Monkey Business), and it all came crashing down in a blaze of flashbulbs, the birth of 24-hour news cycles, tabloid speculation, and late-night farce. Matt Bai shows how the Hart affair marked a crucial turning point in the ethos of political media--and, by extension, politics itself--when candidates' 'character' began to draw more fixation than their political experience. Bai offers a poignant, highly original, and news-making reappraisal of Hart's fall from grace (and overlooked political legacy) as he makes the compelling case that this was the moment when the paradigm shifted--private lives became public, news became entertainment, and politics became the stuff of Page Six"--… (mais)
Membro:Sarah_NOVA
Título:All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid
Autores:Matt Bai (Autor)
Informação:Knopf (2014), Edition: First Edition, 263 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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Etiquetas:to-read

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All the Truth Is Out: The Week Politics Went Tabloid por Matt Bai

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A superb treatment of a still-mysterious episode in modern American politics. ( )
  jensenmk82 | May 4, 2020 |
Bored The rise and fall of Gary Hart in his Presidential election run is part of US political lore. Matt Bai decided to take a closer look at the circumstances and events surrounding this particular event, to show that this was what opened the gates to the gossipy, crazy political reporting world we live in.
 
Bai looks at Cramer's What It Takes, which follows the 1988 Presidential election. Bai zeroes in on Hart's supposed extramarital affair with Donna Rice and the fallout. Bai interviews Hart himself, Hart's wife Lee, the reporters covering the election and the Rice story. He traces how the reporters followed a tip (who was a friend of Rice's), how it was reported, and how Hart's campaign ultimately failed to handle it.
 
Despite the hype of various people on Twitter, I just couldn't get into this either. I tried reading What It Takes but I was bored senseless by it. This wasn't much better. While it was a fascinating read from a historical perspective (imagine if this happened in today's world of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter), ultimately I'm not really sure Bai makes his case.
 
The most interesting thing I got out of it was that Hart was essentially sidelined from politics. Despite attempts to get in on the Clinton administration and endorsing then-Senator Barack Obama early on, Hart has pretty much remained a punchline or anecdote when people talk about him. As of this writing he's a special envoy to Northern Ireland, but that was in October 2014. It seems hard to believe Hart had nothing to offer the party when the aftermath first happened, although it's more understandable if the party currently feels he's out of date and out of touch. It makes me wonder if there's more to this story or if there's something about Hart that people don't know.
 
The book is pretty hyped, but I can't say I understand why. Unless you're a historian of sorts, I'd borrow it from the library. ( )
  HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
Sometimes gut-wrenching, this is a fascinating exploration of why, how, and when politics and the coverage of politics changed, drastically and irreversibly. Chalked up to whim or coincidence, or to a force that was building, the fact is that the relationship between presidential hopefuls (and politicians in general, perhaps) and journalists was forever changed in the 1980s, and arguably, in 1987 to be exact. As the popularization of television changed the way that politics and politicians Could be reported, so too did a scandal surrounding Gary Hart's personal life change the way that reporters could and would follow politicians. And whether these changes are chalked up to whim and coincidence or to a force that was building in society, and sure to come at some point, the fact is that the change happening as it did and when it did had consequences that are hard to fathom.

Bai's All the Truth is Out is something of a dissection, but also much more. As the world watches the primaries of 2016, where entertainment and values and opposite forces have maybe never before been more in play, it's difficult to read this book and not feel some form of regret. But for every individual out there who's sitting back and occasionally wondering, 'How did we get to this point?', I firmly believe that this is a must-read. The author's examination and presentation of history, policy, and game-changing values & questions is utterly masterful.

It's hard for me to imagine who shouldn't be interested in reading this book, simply enough, and I believe there's a lot to be said for knowing -- and understanding -- where we've come from, and all of the material presented in this fascinating, heartbreaking, worthwhile book.

Obviously, absolutely recommended. ( )
  whitewavedarling | Mar 5, 2016 |
This was a really excellent book. Really puts into perspective the stupidity of the press. ( )
  dham340 | Jun 8, 2015 |
Most people hate the current political culture of lies, vapid empty suits, and the demonizing of those on any side of a political argument by those on some other side. We dislike what has become of our press, both national and local. We distrust our political leaders more than we ever have before.

We have to ask ourselves - do we have the government, the leadership, that we deserve?

Does character count?

Matt Bai's book did something that's more rare than it should be - it caused me to rethink what I thought I knew of a situation, and caused me to reevaluate some personal ideas about our culture. It's a very thoughtful work, very readable despite packing an incredible amount of factual reporting and complex analysis into remarkably few pages.

As someone who was an adult voter in 1987 during the Gary Hart "scandal", and as someone who read a lot about politics and who considered myself at the least an informed citizen, I had no doubt that I knew and understood what happened to Gary Hart and his campaign. I shook my head and moaned about the loss to our country of such a talented and brilliant man, and said what many people have said in the last 27 years - "How could such a smart man do something so dumb?"

Of course Gary Hart had an affair with Donna Rice, right? Of course he challenged the national press corp to "follow me around", didn't he? We all know that that hilarious photo of him wearing the "Monkey Business" tshirt with Rice on his lap caused him to drop out of the 1988 presidential campaign, no doubt in our minds.

This book not only brings a long-needed reassessment and reclarification of that facts of that time, Bai is also very convincing in his arguments that this one "media event" was perhaps the turning point in our informing press becoming our entertaining press, our leaders becoming soulless followers of public opinion, (rightfully) frightened of uttering a misplaced word, tap-dancing for our approval rather illuminating and elevating our condition.

You really should read this book. Only in the last chapter does Bai expound more on just what those changes has wrought in recent years. The last two paragraphs of the book are extremely touching and, I believe, deserved.

Does character count? Of course. It's what we consider to be "character" that's causing many of our current problems. ( )
  Keith.G.Richie | Nov 16, 2014 |
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"The former chief political correspondent for The New York Times Magazine brilliantly revisits the Gary Hart affair and looks at how it changed forever the intersection of American media and politics. In 1987, Gary Hart--articulate, dashing, refreshingly progressive--seemed a shoo-in for the Democratic nomination for president and led George H.W. Bush comfortably in the polls. And then: rumors of marital infidelity, an indelible photo of Hart and a model snapped near a fatefully named yacht (Monkey Business), and it all came crashing down in a blaze of flashbulbs, the birth of 24-hour news cycles, tabloid speculation, and late-night farce. Matt Bai shows how the Hart affair marked a crucial turning point in the ethos of political media--and, by extension, politics itself--when candidates' 'character' began to draw more fixation than their political experience. Bai offers a poignant, highly original, and news-making reappraisal of Hart's fall from grace (and overlooked political legacy) as he makes the compelling case that this was the moment when the paradigm shifted--private lives became public, news became entertainment, and politics became the stuff of Page Six"--

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