Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Galatea 2.2 por Richard Powers
A carregar...

Galatea 2.2 (original 1995; edição 2004)

por Richard Powers (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
1,2032112,384 (3.76)56
Read this thrilling and timely novel of the human soul from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory. After many years of living abroad, a young writer returns to the United States to take up a position at his former college. There he encounters Philip Lentz, an outspoken neurologist intent on using computers to model the human brain. Lentz involves the writer in an outlandish and irresistible project - to train a computing system by reading a canonical list of Great Books. Through repeated tutorials, the machine grows gradually more worldly, until it demands to know its own age, sex, race and reason for existing. 'An ingenious, ambitious, at times dizzily cerebral work... It soars and spins... The novel attains an aching, melancholy beauty' New York Times… (mais)
Membro:CeeHag
Título:Galatea 2.2
Autores:Richard Powers (Autor)
Informação:Picador (2004), Edition: Second, 336 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Galatea 2.2 por Richard Powers (1995)

A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 56 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Books and AI. How could I resist? A few of my favorite bits here:
https://www.smays.com/2016/07/galatea2/ ( )
  smays | Jul 14, 2021 |
My thoughts on Richard Powers have been expressed before. He remains a divisive figure. Many doubt his prowess. Some find him too American. This could be an example of Asperger's literature. I object to that last sentiment. This is a novel with heart. Somewhere between artificial intelligence and Ani Difranco, Mr Powers afforded voice to a muddled world of emotions and violence: both somehow framed in the altered world of office hours. His ouerve often appears to be talking therapy. He's backtracking from his interpersonal perils by means of evocative digression, yet he can't leave the University grounds. I can't fault him for such. I have read Galatea 2.2 three times and have never broken into song. ( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
Disappointing. It's on the list of 100 Best SF Novels (Broderick & DiFilippo), and it's certainly no potboiler, but it's a bit of a snooze (or perhaps I just didn't "get it.") The author identified several characters (and places) by first initial only, but others he named outright--it's offputting and I couldn't see the value of that particular choice.

At least half the novel detailed the breakdown of a relationship the protagonist had with a Manic-Depressive Pixie Dream Girl who seemed extremely difficult and he was well rid of her. I don't think the character (or perhaps author) realised that.

I think there are more fun, more gripping, more tautly-constructed works out there. Decent, but missable. ( )
  ashleytylerjohn | Sep 19, 2018 |
3.5 stars.

I liked the premise well enough. The execution I found a little wordy and heavy on literary devices. To be honest, though, I took a hell of a lot of time to get through this book, so my impression of it is very fragmented and incoherent. ( )
  UDT | May 1, 2018 |
Galatea 2.2 is book that feels very 90s. Its prose is littered with postmodernist buzzwords and now obsolescent technical jargon, its parallel plots of the construction of Helen and the failed relationship with C both feel unsatisfactorily contrived and its motifs of globalization and the fear of creeping computerization are both now hopelessly dated.
But even if Galatea 2.2 didn't suffer from these faults, it would also have to contend with the author's unartful "Pynchonian" use of technical metaphors, scads of minor characters who should have contributed much more, and the stalking obsession he has with a graduate student near the end of the book.
I feel that the author is capable of much better and was probably emotionally distressed when he wrote this and I'm honestly hoping that it was only written to fulfill a contract, because a book this sloppy cannot possibly be a work of passion for a MacArthur fellow. ( )
  noonaut | Jan 19, 2017 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 21 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
sem críticas | adicionar uma crítica

» Adicionar outros autores

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Richard Powersautor principaltodas as ediçõescalculated
Damsma, HarmTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Kaye, Michael IanDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
La Fornarina, RaphaelArtista da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Metsch, FritzDesignerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Miedema, NiekTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Schmitz, WernerÜbersetzerautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
正, 若島翻訳autor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
The brain is wider than the sky,
For, put them side by side,
The one the other will contain
With ease, and you beside.

The brain is deeper than the sea,
For, hold them, blue to blue,
The one the other will absorb,
As sponges, buckets do.

The brain is just the weight of God,
For, heft them, pound for pound,
And they will differ, if they do,
As syllable from sound.

-Emily Dickinson
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
It was like so, but wasn't.
Citações
Últimas palavras
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (1)

Read this thrilling and timely novel of the human soul from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Overstory. After many years of living abroad, a young writer returns to the United States to take up a position at his former college. There he encounters Philip Lentz, an outspoken neurologist intent on using computers to model the human brain. Lentz involves the writer in an outlandish and irresistible project - to train a computing system by reading a canonical list of Great Books. Through repeated tutorials, the machine grows gradually more worldly, until it demands to know its own age, sex, race and reason for existing. 'An ingenious, ambitious, at times dizzily cerebral work... It soars and spins... The novel attains an aching, melancholy beauty' New York Times

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (3.76)
0.5 1
1 4
1.5
2 11
2.5 3
3 60
3.5 23
4 91
4.5 10
5 48

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,147,777 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível