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The Letters of the Younger Pliny
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The Letters of the Younger Pliny (edição 1967)

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9991615,299 (3.77)10
In these letters to his friends and relations, Pliny the Younger, lawyer, author, and natural philosopher, provides a fascinating insight into Roman life in the period 97 to 112 AD. Part autobiography, part social history, they document the career and interests of a senator and leading imperial official whose friends include the historians Tacitus and Suetonius. Pliny's letters cover a wide range of topics, from the contemporary political scene to domestic affairs, the educational system, the rituals and conduct of Roman religion, the treatment of slaves, and the phenomena of nature. He describes in vivid detail the eruption of Vesuvius, which killed his uncle, and the daily routines of a well-to-do Roman in the courts and at leisure, in the city, or enjoying rural pursuits at his country estates. This is a lively new translation by eminent scholar Peter Walsh, based on the Oxford Classical Text and drawing on the latest scholarship. In his introduction, Walsh considers the political background of the letters, the span of Pliny's career, the range of topics covered in the letters, and Pliny's literary style. Invaluable notes identify the letters' recipients and explain allusions to historical events and terms. A general index is supplemented by two specific indexes on aspects of social life and Pliny's correspondents. This classic will make great reading for those with an interest in classical literature and ancient history. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.… (mais)
Membro:BurtonRobertsBooks
Título:The Letters of the Younger Pliny
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Informação:Penguin Books (1967), Paperback
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
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The Letters por Gaius Plinius Caecilius Secundus (Author)

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Mostrando 1-5 de 16 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
A delightful read that takes you behind the scenes and into the mind of a first century Roman author and official. Translated by Betty Radice, who wrote the great introduction to my Penguin copy of Horace's Odes, this quick read covers a variety of topics that are sure to teach you something new or interesting. It was neat reading about two of his spacious homes, one in Laurentum (2.17) and another in Tuscany (5.6). I devoured the information on his uncle, Pliny the Elder, enjoying the letters on his works and life (3.5) and his death at Pompeii during the Vesuvius eruption (6.16, 6.20). These letters on the Vesuvius eruption were written to Tacitus, and it is sad that the part of Tacitus's Histories that would have covered that time period are no longer extant. One wonders if he would have included Pliny the Younger's information. The letters touch on professionalism (1.23, 2.3, 10.97), his beautiful love for his wife Calpurnia (7.5), the death of the writer Martial (3.2) and early thoughts on the Christian cult (10.96).

Throughout, you can see that Pliny derives great pleasure from reading. In one letter, he says it best: "Literature is both my joy and my comfort: it can add to every happiness and there is no sorrow it cannot console" (8.19). I couldn't put it any better. ( )
  drew_asson | Dec 3, 2020 |
"I'm really enjoying reading Pliny. It's strange, but I really identify with him. He's just this guy, he's got his job to do, but what he really cares about is literature, reading it, writing a bit of it, talking about it with his friends."
"Okay."
"I've been imagining myself as Pliny when I write emails. Will this go down in posterity? How can I be a little wittier? Should I redraft this?"
"You know he owned half of Italy, right? And you have a part time job at a liberal arts college?"

That really happened. Trust my wife to bring me down a peg. Anyway, I stand by what I said, even though Pliny was massively rich and hob-nobbed with emperors. These letters are really interesting, provided you can get into at least two of the categories:

i) Literary criticism
ii) Legal affairs
iii) Bureaucratic wheedling
iv) Personal lives of Roman aristocrats
v) Gossip with famous historians
vi) Minutiae of governing a province

I enjoyed them all to begin with. The legal affairs got pretty dull pretty quickly, though they're great history, I'm sure; long discussions of cases Pliny presented or witnessed. The wheedling was pleasant, since it's nice to see office politics on a truly grand scale, but palls soon enough. The minutiae is, again, good for historians, but fairly dull reading (dear emperor, should I let these people build a swimming pool? Yours, Pliny). The literary criticism was, of course, my favorite for some time; it's thrilling to read someone's letters about Martial. They're also interesting because of the weight put on style. We could learn something there; Pliny even makes the argument that writing works with vapid content is more challenging, because the style has to be so much more rigorous (rather than, e.g., not writing things with vapid content). The personal lives stuff was okay for a while, but there are only so many grand performance eulogies you can read before they blend into one another. Gossip between Pliny, Tacitus, and Suetonius, however, was always fascinating, just because of who they are.

The point of all this is: the book offers diminishing returns. Books VIII and IX in particular, are deadly boring. But well worth flicking through the rest. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
I picked this up because I saw it reviewed elsewhere (can't recall where now). Anyhow, it is not the most interesting book unless you really are into minutia. Pliny the Younger was a lawyer and politician in Imperial Rome, and much of the correspondence deals with cases he tried. It also deals with letters to friends, providing political advice and other types of advice, etc. If nothing else, it shows that politicians back in the day were not that different than today's in the sense of self-promotion, trying to eek out a position, look good, so on. This is basically a look at the regular life of a regular person during the Empire. Not bad, but not great either. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
Trad.: Marçal Olivar. Rev.: Joaquim Balcells.
  BibliotecaSunyol | Oct 24, 2018 |
Trad.: Marçal Olivar. Rev. Joaquim Balcells
  BibliotecaSunyol | Oct 24, 2018 |
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» Adicionar outros autores (59 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Plinius Caecilius Secundus, GaiusAutorautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Baar, Marry vanDesigner da capaautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Bacardzieva, NicolinaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Brodribb, William JacksonTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Church, Alfred JohnTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Hutchinson, W. M. L.Editorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Melmoth, WilliamTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Peters, TonTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Radice, BettyTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Todoranova, VasilenaTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
Walsh, P. G.Tradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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In these letters to his friends and relations, Pliny the Younger, lawyer, author, and natural philosopher, provides a fascinating insight into Roman life in the period 97 to 112 AD. Part autobiography, part social history, they document the career and interests of a senator and leading imperial official whose friends include the historians Tacitus and Suetonius. Pliny's letters cover a wide range of topics, from the contemporary political scene to domestic affairs, the educational system, the rituals and conduct of Roman religion, the treatment of slaves, and the phenomena of nature. He describes in vivid detail the eruption of Vesuvius, which killed his uncle, and the daily routines of a well-to-do Roman in the courts and at leisure, in the city, or enjoying rural pursuits at his country estates. This is a lively new translation by eminent scholar Peter Walsh, based on the Oxford Classical Text and drawing on the latest scholarship. In his introduction, Walsh considers the political background of the letters, the span of Pliny's career, the range of topics covered in the letters, and Pliny's literary style. Invaluable notes identify the letters' recipients and explain allusions to historical events and terms. A general index is supplemented by two specific indexes on aspects of social life and Pliny's correspondents. This classic will make great reading for those with an interest in classical literature and ancient history. About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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