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Dreamland: The True Tale of America's…
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Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic (original 2015; edição 2016)

por Sam Quinones (Autor)

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7462822,893 (4.14)33
Sam Quinones chronicles how, over the past 15 years, enterprising sugar cane farmers in a small county on the west coast of Mexico created a unique distribution system that brought black tar heroin-- the cheapest, most addictive form of the opiate, 2 to 3 times purer than its white powder cousin-- to the veins of people across the United States.… (mais)
Membro:thacher
Título:Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic
Autores:Sam Quinones (Autor)
Informação:Bloomsbury Press (2016), Edition: Reprint, 400 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:February 2020, Social Science, Drug additiction, Drug traffic

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Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic por Sam Quinones (2015)

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» Ver também 33 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 28 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
"Every so often I read a work of narrative nonfiction that makes me want to get up and preach: Read this true Story! Such is Sam Quinones' astonishing work of reporting and writing" --Mary Ann Gwin. The Seattle Times
  Doranms | Aug 18, 2021 |
This wide-ranging, insightful story of America's opiate crisis makes for painful and sad reading. The author keeps things moving while presenting the sobering facts. One thing that struck me is the mistaken belief some parents had that a 30-day therapy/detox would "fix" their kids' addictions. It's a lifetime struggle. I'm sure many families, including my own, have been touched by the scourge of heroin and opiate pills like OxyContin. Big pharma comes off looking really bad in their crass pursuit of the Almighty Dollar. The author has an engaging narrative style I found easy to follow. If you want to know more about what happened, this book might be the right one for you. ( )
  edlynskey | Aug 1, 2021 |
For the past couple decades, pharmaceutical companies have pushed prescription pain relievers leading to their misuse. An Opioid Crisis has emerged leaving over 50,000 Americans dead and millions suffering from substance use disorders.

Read the recently published nonfiction young adult book, then learn more at the website:

DREAMLAND: THE TRUE TALE OF AMERICA’S OPIATE EPIDEMIC by Sam Quinones is a young adult adaptation of the popular adult book. Using a community in Ohio as an example, the author explains the rise of painkillers in America, their promotion by pharmaceutical companies, and the increase in illegal drugs from Mexico.

The Opioid Overdose Crisis website from the National Institute on Drug Abuse provides an overview of the epidemic, summaries by state, and related resources including reports, plans, videos, and infographics.

Opioid Overdose Crisis https://bit.ly/2j6YEE1

ARC courtesy of Bloomsbury. ( )
  eduscapes | Apr 6, 2021 |
Great book on the rise of Purdue Pharma’s OxyContin followed by the Jalisco black tar explosion. What was especially interesting to me is how differently the Jalisco crews operated compared to previous drug smuggling organizations — they were high service, no violence, and basically corporate.

I’m left hating Purdue and the Medicaid/insurer complex more than the Mexican criminal gangs somehow. I would probably jury nullify any action taken against any of the above, though.

It seems like there is basically going to be a lost generation (or 2-3 generations) due to this. Arguably maintenance-dose opiates might be a better solution for these people than any other alternative, but avoiding new addictions is important as well. It is one of the biggest domestic policy problems of the next 50 years. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
This book struggles to get pacing right. Many titles use the strategy of having multiple story lines that are happening at different points in time, in which the author switches back and forth to keep the reader's interest. But the handling by Quinones is clumsy and ends up making the book very repetitive, to the point where I had to check my audiobook timestamps to make sure I didn't somehow accidentally jump back to a chapter I had already listened to. He's always seemingly introducing concepts that have already been introduced (how many times can you tell me where Nayarit is located?)

I also thought the book could have done a much better job of connecting the reader to individual characters in the story. In some chapters, particularly the ones on drug marketing, Quinones accomplishes this pretty well by giving more backstory to executives, or tracing the use of a specific piece of research through time. Other times, he is not as successful, and the storytelling suffers.

Ended up listening to ~40% before having to stop. ( )
  rsanek | Dec 26, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 28 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
... a meticulously researched new book ... Mr Quinones tells many tragic tales, including of the deaths of teenagers drawn to heroin after they were wrongly prescribed strong opioid painkillers. He also has some more uplifting stories of policemen and district attorneys who slowly pieced together the Xalisco Boys’ business model and took action
adicionada por Lemeritus | editarThe Economist (sítio Web pago) (Jul 30, 2015)
 
...a book that every American should read. And I state that without reservation ... Dreamland is the result of relentless research and legwork on the part of Quinones, as well as his talented storytelling. The opiate addiction epidemic was caused by a convergence of multiple, seemingly unrelated factors, and Quinones takes these narrative strands and weaves them together seamlessly.
 

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Hellegers, NeilNarradorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado
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In 1929, three decades into what were the great years for the blue-collar town of Portsmouth, on the Ohio River, a private swimming pool opened and they called it Dreamland. -Preface
In the middle-class neighborhood on the east side of Columbus, Ohio, where Myles Schoonover grew up, the kids smoked weed and drank. But while Myles was growing up he knew no one who did heroin. -Introduction
One hot day in the summer of 1999, a young man with tight-cropped hair, new shoes, a clean cream-colored button-down shirt, and pressed beige pants used a phony U.S. driver's license to cross the border into Arizona. -Part I
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West Virginia was one of the seven states with no known Mexican drug-trafficking presence, according to a U.S. Department of Justice 2009 report I had seen. Police had a simple reason for this: There was no Mexican community in which to hide. Mexican immigrants followed the jobs, functioning as a sort of economic barometer: Mexicans in your community meant your area was growing. Huntington and West Virginia had no jobs, no Mexicans either.
Like no other particle on earth, the morphine molecule seemed to possess heaven and hell. It allowed for modern surgery, saving and improving too many lives to count. It stunted and ended too many lives to count with addiction and overdose. Discussing it, you could invoke some of humankind’s greatest cultural creations and deepest questions: Faust, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, discussions on the fundamental nature of man and human behavior, of free will and slavery, of God and evolution. Studying the molecule you naturally wandered into questions like, Can mankind achieve happiness without pain? Would that happiness even be worth it? Can we have it all?
“No physician would simply go on with the same unsuccessful treatment, but that is what happens with opioids,” said Loeser. “Patients come and say, ‘That’s great, Doc, but I need more.’ The doctor gives them a higher dose. Then, three months later, they say the same thing, and so on. The point is if it were working, you wouldn’t need more.”
FDA examiner Dr. Curtis Wright, supervisor of the agency’s team that examined Purdue’s application, thought OxyContin might well possess addictive side effects and thought its only benefit was to reduce the number of pills a patient had to take every day. “Care should be taken to limit competitive promotion,” Wright is quoted as writing in an FDA report by the New York Times’s Barry Meier in his 2003 book on OxyContin, Pain Killer. Wright later left the FDA to work for Purdue.
The FDA approved a unique warning label for OxyContin. It allowed Purdue to claim that OxyContin had a lower potential for abuse than other oxycodone products because its timed-release formula allowed for a delay in absorbing the drug. “No other manufacturer of a Schedule II narcotic ever got the go-ahead from the FDA to make such a claim,” Meier wrote. “It was a claim that soon became a cornerstone of the marketing of OxyContin.”
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Sam Quinones chronicles how, over the past 15 years, enterprising sugar cane farmers in a small county on the west coast of Mexico created a unique distribution system that brought black tar heroin-- the cheapest, most addictive form of the opiate, 2 to 3 times purer than its white powder cousin-- to the veins of people across the United States.

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