Página InicialGruposDiscussãoMaisZeitgeist
Pesquisar O Sítio Web
Este sítio web usa «cookies» para fornecer os seus serviços, para melhorar o desempenho, para analítica e (se não estiver autenticado) para publicidade. Ao usar o LibraryThing está a reconhecer que leu e compreende os nossos Termos de Serviço e Política de Privacidade. A sua utilização deste sítio e serviços está sujeita a essas políticas e termos.
Hide this

Resultados dos Livros Google

Carregue numa fotografia para ir para os Livros Google.

Correction: A Novel (Vintage International)…
A carregar...

Correction: A Novel (Vintage International) (original 1975; edição 2010)

por Thomas Bernhard (Autor)

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
7331023,585 (4.26)44
"Bernhard's prose is lapidary and translucent in its vocabulary, but sinuous and formidably dense in its phrasing. This prose enacts the essential motif of the novel: the notion that every 'correction' is also a negation . . . . The remarkable point is the extent to which the ascetic compactness of Bernhard's style turns these abstractions into a sensory presence . . . . [Bernhard's] connections, at once developmental and contrastive, with the great 'Austrian' constellation of Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Musil and Broch become ever clearer."—George Steiner, Times Literary Supplement "Correction is something exceedingly rare among novels of recent years: a paradigm of consciousness and not simply a product . . . . Bernhard has said that 'the art we need is the art of bearing the unbearable,' and his novel joins that small group of literary works which nobly help us to do that."—Richard Gilman, The Nation "It is high time that we keep Bernhard firmly in our mind, as European readers have been doing for many years now."—Peter Demetz, Christian Science Monitor… (mais)
Membro:slank
Título:Correction: A Novel (Vintage International)
Autores:Thomas Bernhard (Autor)
Informação:Vintage (2010), 288 pages
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Nenhum(a)

Pormenores da obra

Correction por Thomas Bernhard (1975)

Adicionado recentemente porjaydenmccomiskie, matje, jncc, Mgloege, OrderMustBe, twharring, misteraitch, blancomc
Bibliotecas LegadasGillian Rose
  1. 00
    A escritora morta por Núria Añó (Utilizador anónimo)
A carregar...

Adira ao LibraryThing para descobrir se irá gostar deste livro.

Ainda não há conversas na Discussão sobre este livro.

» Ver também 44 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
This was Bernhard's fourth novel, written in a period when he had started to become seriously involved in the theatre and appearing at around the same time as the first part of his autobiography, Die Ursache. Unusually for Bernhard, it contains a paragraph break, which comes a little beyond the halfway point, on page 194.

At the centre of the book is the narrator's close friend Roithamer, a Wittgenstein-like figure who has cut off most of his contacts with his landowning family and their seat, Altensam, to go off and do scientific research in Cambridge. The only member of his family he cares for is his sister, and he has been busy with a project to build her an architecturally innovative cone-shaped house in the middle of a forest. However, she has died before the completion of this ambitious project, and Roithamer has taken his own life.

The narrator comes to stay in the attic room in the home of their mutual friend Höller, a taxidermist, which Roithamer has been using as his Austrian base, in order to sort out the papers he has left behind. At the heart of these is a monograph On Altensam, and everything connected to it, with special reference to the Cone. Roithamer has corrected his draft of this book to create a second draft, then corrected it again, each time apparently unsatisfied that what he has written is true.

The opening paragraph of the novel is a monologue by the narrator, describing his feelings about Roithamer, his death, and his intellectual legacy; about being in Höller's house and seeing him going about his normal trade with his normal family; about the childhood the three of them shared, and so on. At the end of this, in a mad moment at the end of a long sleepless night, he tips out all of Roithamer's writings onto the bed, messing up their sequence.

In the second paragraph, he shares with us his reading of Roithamer's writings, coming at us as in arbitrary order as he picks the papers up, and the narrative voice gradually shifts to Roithamer's own (rather like the indirect narration in Kalkwerk).

Between them, the narrator and Roithamer rant against the evils of Austria, parents, landowners, bourgeois values, pollution, parents, hunting, guns, brothers, scenery, architects, doctors, Linz, parents, hypocrisy, theatre-goers, women, parents, Austria, parents, etc., discuss whether suicide is a logical necessity in the modern world or a romantic self-deception of Austrians, and give us some interesting information about statics and the properties of cones. It's impossible to sum up, but it's a good 360 pages of solid wall-to-wall Bernhard prose, so who cares what it's about? This is writing that you could probably enjoy without even being able to understand German, just for its rhythmic loops and twists: the sardonic humour and black condemnation of just about everything in our boring little lives is merely a bonus... ( )
  thorold | Dec 17, 2020 |
While reading it, this impressed me less than Bernhard's other larger novels, but it seems to have stuck with me. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
Addictive, relentless, obsessional writing
Correction is a strange book, at times bewildering, but overall enthralling, in particular the dense style, which I found addictive.
An unnamed narrator arrives at a friend's house - an unusual house situated on the banks of a fast-flowing river - where another friend, Rothaimer, stayed before he committed suicide in the nearby forest. The story is basically about the unnamed narrator's attempt to fully understand what drove Rothaimer to lose his mind and take his own life. He does this by going through Rothaimer's deranged writings.
On the backcover someone describes Bernhard's writing as a "strange new beauty", and I have to agree. The prose is relentless: there are only two paragraphs! It is somewhat deranged: for the most part it's a rambling monologue concerned with the construction of a Cone in the middle of a forest. It's obsessional, with repetition being a marked feature.
Overall I found Correction a challenging work that is both compelling and dizzying. The main themes of the novel are the nature of genius, the worth of creativity, and the slow-death of life. Unique. ( )
  BlackGlove | Jan 20, 2018 |
A hypnotic overlapping of an unhinged genius and a suspiciously similarly unhinged narrator until their boundaries blur together and perfection through annihilation is sought. ( )
1 vote xicohtli | Jul 20, 2016 |
Read the mad Austrian … if you dare is oft said by readers for it takes only the sane and those of perseverance to read a book of 271 pages of typeface with only two paragraphs and run on sentences lasting half a page. As Nietzsche said, “ when you gaze long into an abyss the abyss also gazes into you” for when you read Roithamer too closely, you begin to experience Roithamer, then you begin to feel like Roithamer, then you lose yourself in Roithamer, and then Roithamer takes over. Roithamer, a friend of the narrator, commits suicide in Austria, and the narrator plans to stay a few weeks in Hoeller’s garret where Roithamer lived. The narrator becomes immersed in Roithamer’s writings, a litany of diatribes on family, community, education, buildings, anything and everything viewed through an obsessive compulsive disorder. Near the end it becomes obvious the narrator is so consumed by Roithamer he’ll never leave the garret. ( )
  ShelleyAlberta | Jun 4, 2016 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 10 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
The impossibility of crossing the barrier between self and other is one of Bernhard's obsessions. The narrator who resuscitates the dead Roithamer through the study of his writings does so at the cost of his own subjectivity: he becomes Roithamer's double.

Correction is Bernhard's most profound book, but its repetitive misogyny seriously undermines its power: "The female sex is incapable of going beyond the first impulse in the direction of the life of the mind," is a characteristic Roithamer remark, and it is said of Roithamer's nephew's suicide that "six months after they noticed he was gone, his young wife hadn't missed him until then."
adicionada por SnootyBaronet | editarThe New York Review of Books, Robert Craft
 

» Adicionar outros autores (4 possíveis)

Nome do autorPapelTipo de autorObra?Estado
Bernhard, Thomasautor principaltodas as ediçõesconfirmado
Wilkins, SophieTradutorautor secundárioalgumas ediçõesconfirmado

Belongs to Publisher Series

Tem de autenticar-se para poder editar dados do Conhecimento Comum.
Para mais ajuda veja a página de ajuda do Conhecimento Comum.
Título canónico
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Título original
Títulos alternativos
Data da publicação original
Pessoas/Personagens
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Locais importantes
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Acontecimentos importantes
Filmes relacionados
Prémios e menções honrosas
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
Epígrafe
Dedicatória
Primeiras palavras
Citações
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
In such a time of precipitateness and overhastiness and the consequent chaotic conditions a thinking man should never act precipitately or overhastily in anything that concerns him, but every single one of us constantly acts precipitately, overhastily, in every way.
Últimas palavras
Nota de desambiguação
Editores da Editora
Autores de citações elogiosas (normalmente na contracapa do livro)
Língua original
Informação do Conhecimento Comum em inglês. Edite para a localizar na sua língua.
DDC/MDS canónico
Canonical LCC

Referências a esta obra em recursos externos.

Wikipédia em inglês (2)

"Bernhard's prose is lapidary and translucent in its vocabulary, but sinuous and formidably dense in its phrasing. This prose enacts the essential motif of the novel: the notion that every 'correction' is also a negation . . . . The remarkable point is the extent to which the ascetic compactness of Bernhard's style turns these abstractions into a sensory presence . . . . [Bernhard's] connections, at once developmental and contrastive, with the great 'Austrian' constellation of Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Musil and Broch become ever clearer."—George Steiner, Times Literary Supplement "Correction is something exceedingly rare among novels of recent years: a paradigm of consciousness and not simply a product . . . . Bernhard has said that 'the art we need is the art of bearing the unbearable,' and his novel joins that small group of literary works which nobly help us to do that."—Richard Gilman, The Nation "It is high time that we keep Bernhard firmly in our mind, as European readers have been doing for many years now."—Peter Demetz, Christian Science Monitor

Não foram encontradas descrições de bibliotecas.

Descrição do livro
Resumo Haiku

Capas populares

Ligações Rápidas

Avaliação

Média: (4.26)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 16
3.5 3
4 38
4.5 9
5 56

É você?

Torne-se num Autor LibraryThing.

 

Acerca | Contacto | LibraryThing.com | Privacidade/Termos | Ajuda/Perguntas Frequentes | Blogue | Loja | APIs | TinyCat | Bibliotecas Legadas | Primeiros Críticos | Conhecimento Comum | 163,341,552 livros! | Barra de topo: Sempre visível