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Spill simmer falter wither por Sara Baume
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Spill simmer falter wither (original 2015; edição 2016)

por Sara Baume

MembrosCríticasPopularidadeAvaliação médiaMenções
3732753,273 (3.86)49
"A debut novel already praised as "unbearably poignant and beautifully told" (Eimear McBride) this captivating story follows -- over the course of four seasons -- a misfit man who adopts a misfit dog. It is springtime, and two outcasts -- a man ignored, even shunned by his village, and the one-eyed dog he takes into his quiet, tightly shuttered life -- find each other, by accident or fate, and forge an unlikely connection. As their friendship grows, their small, seaside town suddenly takes note of them, falsely perceiving menace where there is only mishap; the unlikely duo must take to the road. Gorgeously written in poetic and mesmerizing prose, Spill Simmer Falter Wither has already garnered wild support in its native Ireland, where the Irish Times pointed to Baume's "astonishing power with language" and praised it as "a novel bursting with brio, braggadocio and bite." It is also a moving depiction of how -- over the four seasons echoed in the title -- a relationship between fellow damaged creatures can bring them both comfort. One of those rare stories that utterly, completely imagines its way into a life most of us would never see, it transforms us not only in our understanding of the world, but also of ourselves. "--… (mais)
Membro:wesmrlnd
Título:Spill simmer falter wither
Autores:Sara Baume
Informação:Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016.
Colecções:A sua biblioteca
Avaliação:
Etiquetas:Fiction, ARTf, CSTfnf

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Spill Simmer Falter Wither por Sara Baume (2015)

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» Ver também 49 menções

Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
Beautifully written by author and perfectly read audio. Blisteringly sad and lyrical portrait of a deeply isolated man and his dog. ( )
  jdukuray | Jun 23, 2021 |
A sweet yet unusual book. The protagonist narrates the book as though he is talking to his new dog. It's a little weird, at first, but works very well as a POV as you get to know the man and adjust to his style. It's a bit monotonous -- not in a boring way, but as in a level, consistent pitch and tone kind of way. I had to take a short break from reading this book just for something differently paced. But when I came back, it was all good again.
The narrator (I don't think he ever tells us his name) is very solitary, perhaps on the ASD spectrum, but he slowly unreels his story. It's ...unexpected. But there's so much nature and love for his dog, that no matter how you feel about his past there's a serenity in the story. Maybe it's the lack of many strong emotions that makes the book so even-keeled.
It's for people who love dogs, nature, the beach, or just a quirky, well-written book. The author does an excellent job with the writing. The descriptions are apt but not overdone, the social commentary is original and insightful, the story is also original and interesting. There's an endorsement quote on the cover by Anne Enright that calls the book "beautiful and unexpected" and that is exactly what this book is. ( )
  LDVoorberg | Nov 22, 2020 |
This is not a happy book, so be forewarned. It is a story or transformation, though and is well-crafted. The narrator, who is never named tells the story in a stream-of-consciousness starting essentially with his acquisition of a mutt from the pound who is badly scarred and has the ferocity that goes with his physical wounds. He is looking for a "ratter." The dog is called Oneeye by the narrator because one eye is missing and he seems the most miserable type of dog, yet, the two bond and the dog definitely serves a purpose. The narrator, in his late fifties, could be described as a shut-in -- on many levels. Gradually, with the dog he opens up and is able to tell someone the stories of his meager life. By his own description, he is misshapen -- hump-back? club foot? both? He describes himself as a mountain of a man and his irregular gait seems to hinder his movement. The two have a symbiotic relationship: "Now you are like a bonus limb. Now you are my third leg, an unlimping leg, and I am the eye you lost." (40) He even dreams from the dog's point of view, which is how we get some of the dog's story. We get bits and pieces of the man's life from memories he shares with the dog; it is not a pleasant tale. He was neglected by his father, even though they lived together for 50 years and was kept inside for much of it, not mingling with other (cruel) children or having much interaction with anyone. He gets most of his knowledge from books and much of that centers on flora and fauna, and also birds. He says "I lie down and let life leave its footprints on me." (48) This all takes place in a small village near the sea in Ireland? England? And one day when walking on the beach with Oneeye, the dog attacks another dog and the trouble begins. The narrator is so incapable of dealing with real life and interacting with others that they run away inland rather than face the Animal Authorities who would take the dog away. This journey is cathartic and more of his life comes out, though it comes with a price -- facing reality. The man goes from the attitude of pessimism: " Now everything holds a diaphanous kind of potential. Now everything is so quiet and so nice and I feel ever so faintly less strange, less horrible. It makes me uneasy. It reminds me how I must remember to be distrustful of good fortune." (103) to hope: "I realise that you (dog) were not born with a predetermined capacity for wonder, as I'd believed. I realise that you fed it up yourself from tiny pieces of the world. I realise it's up to me to follow your example and nurture my own wonder, morsel by morsel by morsel." (148) However, he must return home at some point and then the true reality hits him and the reader in the face. The book is a little slow, but the last section picks up. There are pretty turns of phrase and the title refers to both the 4 seasons with the dog (Spill being Spring and onward) and also to the man's slow transformation, freeing him from his past and his overbearing father. The ambiguous ending would be good for book discussion, but the lack of cheer might make it a less popular read. The narrator asks: "Why does everything either starve or drown? Always either too much or too little, always imbalance." (79). If he could find balance (literally and figuratively), there might be hope. ( )
  CarrieWuj | Oct 24, 2020 |
Exceptional. A character-driven narrative of an old man and his dog that is brashly Irish, laden with metaphor and told with a dark humour. Engaging and brilliant writing, exhibiting confidence in a young author who is already deservedly acclaimed. ( )
  ephemeral_future | Aug 20, 2020 |
250 strán o potrebe ľúbiť a byť ľúbený. Jedna z tých kníh, u ktorých si po pár mesiacoch nespomeniete na dej, ale vďaka skvelému opisu si vybavíte pocity. A to je niekedy viac. ( )
  Zuzika | Aug 3, 2020 |
Mostrando 1-5 de 27 (seguinte | mostrar todos)
In many ways, Baume’s book resembles another debut novel, Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (2003). Like Ray, Haddon’s protagonist has a single father who’s concealed crucial details of his mother’s death from his son. The unexpected intervention of an unassuming dog helps both characters find their way to a better understanding of their families and themselves. But where Curious Incident takes its narrative cues from a logical, rule-bound perspective on an overwhelming reality, Spill Simmer Falter Wither does the opposite. Baume’s novel revels in aesthetic leaps and dives, embracing the poetry of sensory experience in all its baffling beauty from the title onward.
adicionada por smasler | editarThe Atlantic, Amy Weiss-Meyer (May 8, 2016)
 
Ray, a disabled man, adopts One Eye, a rescue dog injured while badger baiting, in this debut novel.

We get to know Ray as he speaks to One Eye: “I’m fifty-seven. Too old for starting over, too young for giving up.” We learn he leaves his lonely home on the coast of Ireland once a week to visit the post office and the grocery store. He used to attend Mass, but he hasn’t been lately. He’s a reader and uses the “mobile library.” Ray is alone and both appears and feels different than other people. He tells One Eye, “Sometimes I see the sadness in you, the same sadness that’s in me….My sadness isn’t a way I feel but a thing trapped inside the walls of my flesh, like a smog.” In another passage he explains, “The nasturtiums have it figured out, how survival’s just a matter of filling the gaps between sun up and sun down.”
adicionada por smasler | editarKirkus Reivews (Jan 1, 2016)
 
This fine debut novel, originally published by the independent Irish publisher Tramp Press, now in a Heinemann paperback edition, and longlisted for this year’s Guardian first book award, is a fascinating portrait of the friendship a man develops with his dog and the companionship he also finds in books. (“I longed to be left to my books,” he reminisces. “I wish you could understand when I read to you,” he tells his dog.) The man and dog are both outsiders in a claustrophobic coastal community and both are weighed down by fear and sadness.
adicionada por smasler | editarThe Guardian, Anita Sethi (Sep 13, 2015)
 
Baume is not one of those storytellers who supply the entire picture. She drops clues and leaves gaps. You deduce that the narrator’s name is Ray, that his late father was Robin. The action begins in coastal east Co Cork, perhaps near the oil refinery at Whitegate, before narrator and dog are forced by local misunderstanding or mishap to take to the road as fugitives. Ray includes his phone number in the novel, but I was afraid to ring it. Baume writes him so persuasively that I felt he would answer.
So confident is this extraordinary debut that the reader doesn’t notice how much of it is narrated in the second person. The “you” intensifies a tone of great intimacy and tact. It’s impossible to write about a “you” without revealing whole reservoirs about the “I”, one of fiction’s loveliest paradoxes.
adicionada por smasler | editarThe Irish Times, Joseph O'Conner (Feb 7, 2015)
 

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"A debut novel already praised as "unbearably poignant and beautifully told" (Eimear McBride) this captivating story follows -- over the course of four seasons -- a misfit man who adopts a misfit dog. It is springtime, and two outcasts -- a man ignored, even shunned by his village, and the one-eyed dog he takes into his quiet, tightly shuttered life -- find each other, by accident or fate, and forge an unlikely connection. As their friendship grows, their small, seaside town suddenly takes note of them, falsely perceiving menace where there is only mishap; the unlikely duo must take to the road. Gorgeously written in poetic and mesmerizing prose, Spill Simmer Falter Wither has already garnered wild support in its native Ireland, where the Irish Times pointed to Baume's "astonishing power with language" and praised it as "a novel bursting with brio, braggadocio and bite." It is also a moving depiction of how -- over the four seasons echoed in the title -- a relationship between fellow damaged creatures can bring them both comfort. One of those rare stories that utterly, completely imagines its way into a life most of us would never see, it transforms us not only in our understanding of the world, but also of ourselves. "--

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823.92 — Literature English English fiction Modern Period 21st Century

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